Giorgi Japaridze

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Giorgi Japaridze (also spelled Giorgie Dzhaparidze) is a Georgian-American researcher in logic and theoretical computer science. He currently holds the title of Full Professor[1] at the Computing Sciences Department of Villanova University. Japaridze is best known for his invention of computability logic, cirquent calculus, and Japaridze's polymodal logic.

Research[edit]

During 1985–1988[2] Japaridze elaborated the system GLP, known as Japaridze's polymodal logic.[3][4][5][6] This is a system of modal logic with the “necessity” operators [0],[1],[2],…, understood as a natural series of incrementally weak provability predicates for Peano arithmetic. In "The polymodal logic of provability"[7] Japaridze proved the arithmetical completeness of this system, as well as its inherent incompleteness with respect to Kripke frames. GLP has been extensively studied by various authors during the subsequent three decades, especially after Lev Beklemishev, in 2004,[8] pointed out its usefulness in understanding the proof theory of arithmetic (provability algebras and proof-theoretic ordinals).

Japaridze has also studied the first-order (predicate) versions of provability logic. He came up with an axiomatization of the single-variable fragment of that logic, and proved its arithmetical completeness and decidability.[9] In the same paper he showed that, on the condition of the 1-completeness of the underlying arithmetical theory, predicate provability logic with non-iterated modalities is recursively enumerable. In[10] he did the same for the predicate provability logic with non-modalized quantifiers.

In 1992–1993, Japaridze came up with the concepts of cointerpretability, tolerance and cotolerance, naturally arising in interpretability logic.[11][12] He proved that cointerpretability is equivalent to 1-conservativity and tolerance is equivalent to 1-consistency. The former was an answer to the long-standing open problem regarding the metamathematical meaning of 1-conservativity. Within the same line of research, Japaridze constructed the modal logics of tolerance>[13] (1993) and the arithmetical hierarchy[14] (1994), and proved their arithmetical completeness. In 2002 Japaridze introduced “the Logic of Tasks”,[15] which later became a part of his Abstract Resource Semantics[16][17] on one hand, and a fragment of Computability Logic (see below) on the other hand.

Japaridze is best known[citation needed] for founding Computability Logic in 2003 and making subsequent contributions to its evolution. This is a long-term research program and a semantical platform for “redeveloping logic as a formal theory of (interactive) computability, as opposed to the formal theory of truth that it has more traditionally been”.[18] In 2006[19] Japaridze conceived cirquent calculus as a proof-theoretic approach that manipulates graph-style constructs, termed cirquents, instead of the more traditional and less general tree-like constructs such as formulas or sequents. This novel proof-theoretic approach was later successfully used to “tame” various fragments of computability logic,[20][21] which had otherwise stubbornly resisted all axiomatization attempts within the traditional proof theory such as sequent calculus or Hilbert-style systems. It was also used to (define and) axiomatize the purely propositional fragment of Independent-Friendly Logic.[22][23][24] The birth of cirquent calculus was accompanied with offering the associated “abstract resource semantics”. Cirquent calculus with that semantics can be seen as a logic of resources which, unlike Linear Logic, makes it possible to account for resource-sharing. As such, it has been presented by Japaridze as a viable alternative to linear logic, who repeatedly has criticized the latter for being neither sufficiently expressive nor complete as a resource logic. This challenge, however, has remained largely unnoticed by the linear logic community, which never responded to it.[citation needed]

Japaridze has cast a similar (and also never answered) challenge to intuitionistic logic,[25] criticizing it for lacking a convincing semantical justification the associated constructivistic claims, and for being incomplete as a result of “throwing out the baby with the bath water”. Heiting’s intuitionistic logic, in its full generality, has been shown to be sound[26] but incomplete[27] with respect to the semantics of computability logic. The positive (negation-free) propositional fragment of intuitionistic logic, however, has been proven to be complete with respect to the computability-logic semantics.[28] In "On the system CL12 of computability logic",[29] on the platform of computability logic, Japaridze generalized the traditional concepts of time and space complexities to interactive computations, and introduced a third sort of a complexity measure for such computations, termed “amplitude complexity”. Among Japaridze’s contributions is the elaboration of a series of systems of (Peano) arithmetic based on computability logic, named “clarithmetics”.[30][31][32] These include complexity-oriented systems (in the style of bounded arithmetic) for various combinations of time, space and amplitude complexity classes.

Biography and academic career[edit]

Giorgi Japaridze was born in 1961 in Tbilisi, Georgia (then in the Soviet Union). He graduated from Tbilisi State University in 1983, received a PhD degree (in philosophy) from Moscow State University in 1987, and then a second PhD degree (in computer science) from the University of Pennsylvania in 1998. During 1987-1992 Japaridze worked as a Senior Researcher at the Institute of Philosophy of the Georgian Academy of Sciences. During 1992-1993 he was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Amsterdam (Mathematics and Computer Science department). During 1993-1994 he held the position of a Visiting Associate Professor at the University of Notre Dame (Philosophy Department). He has joined the faculty of Villanova University (Computing Sciences Department). Japaridze has also worked as a Visiting Professor at Xiamen University (2007) and Shandong University (2010-2013) in China.[33]

Awards[edit]

In 1982, for his work “Determinism and Freedom of Will”, Japaridze received a Medal from the Georgian Academy of Sciences for the best student research paper, granted to one student in the nation each year. In 2015, he received an Outstanding Faculty Research Award from Villanova University, granted to one faculty member each year.[34] Japaridze has been a recipient of various grants and scholarships, including research grants from the US National Science Foundation, Villanova University and Shandong University, Postdoctoral Fellowship from the Dutch government, Smullyan Fellowship from Indiana University (never utilized), and Dean’s Fellowship from the University of Pennsylvania.[35]

Related bibliography[edit]

Logic Journal of the IGPL 22 (2014), pages 982-991.

Selected publications[edit]

Logical Methods is Computer Science 7 (2011), Issue 2 , Paper 1, pages 1-55.

Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 85 (1997), pages 87-156.

Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 61 (1993), pages 113-160.

Studia Logica 50 (1991), pages 149-160.

Dokady Mathematics 297 (1987), pages 521-523 (Russian). English translation in: Soviet Math. Doklady 36, pp. 478–480.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://csc.villanova.edu/faculty/fullTime
  2. ^ G.Japaridze, “The polymodal logic of provability”. Intensional Logics and Logical Structure of Theories. Metsniereba, Tbilisi, 1988, pages 16-48 (Russian).
  3. ^ G. Boolos, “The analytical completeness of Japaridze's polymodal logics”. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 61 (1993), pages 95–111.
  4. ^ L.D. Beklemishev, J.J. Joosten and M. Vervoort, “A finitary treatment of the closed fragment of Japaridze's provability logic”. Journal of Logic and Computation 15(4) (2005), pages 447-463.
  5. ^ I. Shapirovsky, “PSPACE-decidability of Japaridze's polymodal logic". Advances in Modal Logic 7 (2008), pages 289-304.
  6. ^ F.Pakhomov, “On the complexity of the closed fragment of Japaridze's provability logic”. Archive for Mathematical Logic 53 (2014), pages 949–967.
  7. ^ G.Japaridze, “The polymodal logic of provability”. Intensional Logics and Logical Structure of Theories. Metsniereba, Tbilisi, 1988, pages 16-48 (Russian).
  8. ^ L. Beklemishev, "Provability algebras and proof-theoretic ordinals, I". Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 128 (2004), pp. 103–123.
  9. ^ G.Japaridze, “Decidable and enumerable predicate logics of provability”. Studia Logica 49 (1990), pages 7-21.
  10. ^ G.Japaridze, “Predicate provability logic with non-modalized quantifiers”. Studia Logica 50 (1991), pages 149–160.
  11. ^ G.Japaridze, “The logic of linear tolerance”. Studia Logica 51 (1992), pages 249-277.
  12. ^ G.Japaridze, “A generalized notion of weak interpretability and the corresponding modal logic”. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 61 (1993), pages 113-160.
  13. ^ G.Japaridze, “A generalized notion of weak interpretability and the corresponding modal logic”. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 61 (1993), pages 113-160.
  14. ^ G.Japaridze, “The logic of arithmetical hierarchy”. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 66 (1994), pages 89-112.
  15. ^ G.Japaridze, “The logic of tasks”. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 117 (2002), pages 261-293.
  16. ^ G.Japaridze, “Introduction to cirquent calculus and abstract resource semantics”. Journal of Logic and Computation 16 (2006), pages 489-532.
  17. ^ I.Mezhirov and N.Vereshchagin, “On abstract resource semantics and computability logic”. Journal of Computer and Systems Sciences 76 (2010), pages 356-372.
  18. ^ G.Japaridze, “Introduction to clarithmetic I”.Information and Computation 209 (2011), pages 1312-1354.
  19. ^ G.Japaridze, “Introduction to cirquent calculus and abstract resource semantics”. Journal of Logic and Computation 16 (2006), pages 489-532.
  20. ^ G.Japaridze, “The taming of recurrences in computability logic through cirquent calculus, Part I”.Archive for Mathematical Logic 52 (2013), pages 173–212.
  21. ^ G.Japaridze, “The taming of recurrences in computability logic through cirquent calculus, Part II” Archive for Mathematical Logic 52 (2013), pages 213-259.
  22. ^ G.Japaridze, “From formulas to cirquents in computability logic”. Logical Methods is Computer Science 7 (2011), Issue 2, Paper 1, pages 1–55.
  23. ^ G.Japaridze, “On the system CL12 of computability logic”. Logical Methods in Computer Science (in press).
  24. ^ W.Xu, “A propositional system induced by Japaridze's approach to IF logic”. Logic Journal of the IGPL 22 (2014), pages 982–991.
  25. ^ G.Japaridze, “In the beginning was game semantics”. Games: Unifying Logic, Language and Philosophy. O. Majer, A.-V. Pietarinen and T. Tulenheimo, eds. Springer 2009, pages 249-350.
  26. ^ G.Japaridze, “Intuitionistic computability logic”. Acta Cybernetica 18 (2007), pages 77–113.
  27. ^ I.Mezhirov and N.Vereshchagin, “On abstract resource semantics and computability logic”. Journal of Computer and Systems Sciences 76 (2010), pages 356-372.
  28. ^ G.Japaridze, “The intuitionistic fragment of computability logic at the propositional level”. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 147 (2007), pages 187-227.
  29. ^ G.Japaridze, “On the system CL12 of computability logic”. Logical Methods is Computer Science (in press).
  30. ^ G.Japaridze, “Towards applied theories based on computability logic”. Journal of Symbolic Logic 75 (2010), pages 565–601.
  31. ^ G.Japaridze, “Introduction to clarithmetic I”. Information and Computation 209 (2011), pages 1312–1354.
  32. ^ G.Japaridze, “Introduction to clarithmetic III”. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 165 (2014), pages 241–252.
  33. ^ [1] Giorgi Japaridze’s Homepage]
  34. ^ Villanova professor honored for research (Philadelphia Inquirer article)
  35. ^ Giorgi Japaridze: Research and Publications.