Godfrey Louis

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Godfrey Louis is a solid-state physicist from India. His hypotheses about the "red rain" phenomenon in Kerala have attracted controversy. In April 2008, he published a paper in which he hypothesised that samples of particles from the "blood-coloured" rain that fell in his state of Kerala, India in the summer of 2001 were the result of a comet disintegrating in the upper atmosphere which comprised mainly microbes from outer space.[1] The paper drew much media interest. Other scientists disagreed early on with Louis' hypothesis regarding the red rain's origin.[2] An earlier (2001) study by the Centre for Earth Science Studies, Kerala, India, reported that the red rain was the result of spores from local algae.[3]

Since October 2006 Louis has been at Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology (CUSAT) in Kochi, Kerala.

In August 2010 Louis and his collaborators presented a paper at the SPIE astrobiology conference held in San Diego, USA, claiming that the red rain cells develop internal daughter cells and multiply when exposed to extreme temperature of 121 °C in an autoclave for two hours, and that the fluorescent behavior of the red cells is similar to the extended red emission observed in the Red Rectangle nebula.[4]

In August 2012, the Epoch Times newspaper carried comments from Louis concerning another outbreak of red rain in Kannur on 28 June 2012 [5]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Louis, Godfrey; Kumar, A. Santhosh (2006). "The Red Rain Phenomenon of Kerala and its Possible Extraterrestrial Origin". Astrophysics and Space Science. 302: 175–87. Bibcode:2006Ap&SS.302..175L. arXiv:astro-ph/0601022v1Freely accessible. doi:10.1007/s10509-005-9025-4. 
  2. ^ McKie, Robin; Gentleman, Amelia (13 March 2006). "Red rain could prove that aliens have landed". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 2009-09-06. 
  3. ^ Sampath, S.; Abraham, T. K.; Sasi Kumar, V.; Mohanan, C.N. (2001). "Colored Rain: A Report on the Phenomenon" (PDF). Cess-Pr-114-2001. Center for Earth Science Studies and Tropical Botanic Garden and Research Institute. Archived from the original on June 13, 2006. Retrieved August 30, 2009. 
  4. ^ Gangappa, Rajkumar; Wickramasinghe, Chandra; Wainwright, Milton; Kumar, A. Santhosh; Louis, Godfrey (2010). "Growth and replication of red rain cells at 121°C and their red fluorescence". Proceedings of SPIE. Proceedings of SPIE: 78190N. arXiv:1008.4960Freely accessible. doi:10.1117/12.876393. 
  5. ^ Red rain in India may have alien origin by Arshdeep Sarao, Epoch Times 6 August 2012

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