Greg Clarke

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Greg Clarke
Greg-Clarke.jpg
Greg Clarke in January 2018
Chairman of the Football Association
Assumed office
4 September 2016
PresidentHRH The Duke of Cambridge
Preceded byGreg Dyke
Vice President of FIFA
Assumed office
7 February 2019
PresidentGianni Infantino
Personal details
Born (1957-10-27) 27 October 1957 (age 61)
Leicester, Leicestershire, England
NationalityBritish
OccupationExecutive

Gregory Allison Clarke (born 27 October 1957[1] in Leicester, Leicestershire, England) is an English businessman and football administrator, currently chairman of The Football Association and Vice President of FIFA.

Business career[edit]

Clarke is currently chairman of a number of private equity-owned businesses, including Eteach UK Ltd.[2]

From 1994 to 2000, Clarke worked in various businesses in the Cable & Wireless Communications group, eventually serving as CEO up to 2000. From 2002 to 2009 he was CEO of Lend Lease Corporation, an ASX 50 company headquartered in Australia.[3] After Lend Lease, he was briefly CEO of O3b Networks, a Google-backed satellite broadband company.[4] He has also served on the boards of BUPA in the UK and MTN in South Africa.

Football administration[edit]

Clarke was chairman and a director (1999–2002)[5] of Leicester City.[6] He was chairman of The Football League from March 2010[4] to June 2016.[7]

Nominated by the FA board in July 2016, Clarke assumed the role of chairman of the FA on 4 September 2016.[7]

While FA chairman, Clarke had to lead the organisation's response to allegations of historical sexual abuse in football, and of racism and bullying in relation to the Mark Sampson and Eniola Aluko cases.[8] In October 2017, Clarke announced a "fundamental" review of the FA after admitting it had "lost the trust of the public" following the Mark Sampson scandal.[9]

In the same month, Clarke was criticised by sexual abuse victim Andy Woodward for 'humiliating' remarks Clarke made to a Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee hearing,[10][11] while the Professional Footballers' Association's chief executive Gordon Taylor said the PFA might sue Clarke over suggestions Taylor had not supported Woodward with further counselling.[12]

On 7 February 2019, Clarke was elected as a FIFA Vice President at the 43rd UEFA Congress in Rome.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Greg Clarke". UEFA.com. Retrieved 10 March 2019.
  2. ^ "Eteach UK Ltd - people". Companies House. Retrieved 30 October 2017.
  3. ^ "Our People: Board of Directors". Redefine International. Retrieved 30 October 2017.
  4. ^ a b "Football League appoints Greg Clarke as new chairman". The Guardian. Press Association. 12 March 2010. Retrieved 30 October 2017.
  5. ^ "Leicester City PLC - people". Companies House. Retrieved 30 October 2017.
  6. ^ "Man at the top - the Leicester City fan who got his dream job as chairman of the Football League". Leicestermercury.co.uk. 18 May 2010. Retrieved 17 April 2015.
  7. ^ a b Fifield, Dominic (24 August 2016). "Greg Clarke ratified as FA chairman in succession to Greg Dyke". The Guardian. Retrieved 30 October 2017.
  8. ^ Taylor, Daniel (16 October 2017). "Revealed: the 14-word email that puts FA's Greg Clarke under fresh scrutiny". The Guardian. Retrieved 30 October 2017.
  9. ^ Rumsby, Ben (26 October 2017). "Greg Clarke admits out-of-touch FA has 'lost the trust of the public'". The Telegraph. Retrieved 30 October 2017.
  10. ^ Rumbsy, Ben (25 October 2017). "Greg Clarke under fire again as abuse survivor Andy Woodward accuses FA chairman of 'humiliating' him". Telegraph. Retrieved 30 October 2017.
  11. ^ "Woodward 'devastated & deeply upset'". BBC Sport. BBC. 26 October 2017. Retrieved 30 October 2017.
  12. ^ Kelner, Martha (26 October 2017). "PFA's Gordon Taylor considering legal action against FA chairman Greg Clarke". Guardian. Retrieved 30 October 2017.
  13. ^ "Our Chairman Greg Clarke has been elected as a new FIFA Vice-President". The Football Association. 7 February 2019. Retrieved 10 March 2019.