Grigore II Ghica

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Grigore II Ghica

Grigore II Ghica was Voivode (Prince) of Moldavia at four different intervals — from October 1726 to April 16, 1733, from November 27, 1735 to 14 September 1739, from October 1739 to September 1741 and from May 1747 to April 1748[1] — and twice Voivode (Prince) of Wallachia: April 16, 1733 – November 27, 1735 and April 1748 to September 3, 1752. He was son of Matei Ghica (son of Grigore I Ghica).[2]

Reigns[edit]

He was helped to gain the throne in Iaşi by previous Prince Nicolae Mavrocordat, upon Mihai Racoviţă's deposition by the Ottoman overlord. He decreased taxes, but chose to continue the established policy of awarding offices to Greeks and Levantines instead of local boyars. Thus, he faced mounting opposition from Dimitrie Racoviţă, who tried to remove Scarlat by enlisting Budjak Tatars' help - he was however rejected after clashing with Ghica and his Wallachian and Ottoman allies. With the outbreak of the Russo-Turkish War came Imperial Russian occupation, forcing Grigore II Ghica to leave the Moldavia briefly, in September–October 1739.

Although he tried to counter Constantin Mavrocordat's intrigue at the Porte, Ghica was deposed and exiled in 1741, gaining the throne for a final, brief time in 1747–1748. He effectively purchased the throne in Bucharest — the exorbitant payment made him rely on further increased taxation.[3]

Legacy[edit]

He repaired several monasteries and built the Frumoasa one in Iaşi,[4][5] and the one at Pantelimon[6] - the church's patron saint, Panteleimon, is the eponym for both the commune Pantelimon, Ilfov, on the edge of Bucharest, and the Pantelimon Quarter of the capital; Ghica also built and furnished the area's hospital (staffed with Eastern Orthodox monks), the basis for the modern one.

He had two sons:

References[edit]

  1. ^ "RULERS FROM MOLDAVIA TILL 1859". Welcome to Romania. 2007-03-26. Archived from the original on 2007-04-16. 
  2. ^ "List of rulers of Wallachia". search.com. 2007-03-26. 
  3. ^ "HISTORY OF ROMANIA". The Foundation for Romanians from all over the World. 2007-03-27. Archived from the original on 2007-09-26. 
  4. ^ "Historical Monuments Proposed for Restoration (1996 - 1998)". CIMEC Institute for cultural memory. 2007-03-26. 
  5. ^ "Muntenia and Oltenia". Romanian Tourism. 2007-03-26. Archived from the original on 2006-10-18. 
  6. ^ "Table showing (known) money donations made by Roumanian kings to Athos". Centre for Byzantine Studies at Iasi. 2007-03-26. Archived from the original on 2007-09-28. 
Preceded by
John Mavrocordatos
Grand Dragoman of the Porte
1717–1726
Succeeded by
Alexander Ghica
Preceded by
Mihai Racoviţă
Prince of Moldavia
1726–1733
Succeeded by
Constantin Mavrocordat
Preceded by
Constantin Mavrocordat
Prince of Moldavia
1735–1739
Succeeded by
Russian occupation
Preceded by
Russian occupation
Prince of Moldavia
1739–1741
Succeeded by
Constantin Mavrocordat
Preceded by
Ioan Mavrocordat
Prince of Moldavia
1747–1748
Succeeded by
Constantin Mavrocordat
Preceded by
Constantin Mavrocordat
Prince/Voivode of Wallachia
1733–1735
Succeeded by
Constantin Mavrocordat
Preceded by
Constantin Mavrocordat
Prince/Voivode of Wallachia
1748–1752
Succeeded by
Matei Ghica