Guy P. Harrison

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Guy P. Harrison
Harrison in 2009
Harrison in 2009
Born (1963-10-08) October 8, 1963 (age 54)
Occupation Author
Language English
Citizenship American
Alma mater University of South Florida
Website
guypharrison.com

Guy P. Harrison (born October 8, 1963) is an American author.[1] He resides in San Diego and is known for his written works on skepticism and atheism.

Early life and education[edit]

Harrison has degrees in history and anthropology at the University of South Florida.[2] He was influenced towards skepticism by thinking about Erich von Däniken's book Chariots of the Gods?, which theorized that earth had been visited by aliens during antiquity.

Career[edit]

From 1992 to 2010 Harrison wrote for Cayman Free Press in the Cayman Islands as a journalist, editor and photographer. As a journalist he has interviewed people such as Jane Goodall, Chuck Yeager, Edward Teller, Paul Tibbets and Armin Lehmann. From 2014–2015 he did medical writing for Kaiser Permanente.[3] He has a blog at Psychology Today named About Thinking.[4]

Starting with 50 reasons people give for believing in a god in 2008, Harrison has written five books on skeptical and philosophical issues.[5][6] The books are well known in skeptical circles and he has been widely interviewed in relation to his books by many different podcasts and websites.[7][8][9]

His books have received positive feedback from prominent scientists such as Neil deGrasse Tyson, Seth Shostak, and Donald Johanson.[10]

Honors[edit]

Harrison was a recipient of the World Health Organization Award for Health Reporting in 1997 and the Commonwealth Media Award for Excellence in Journalism in 1994.[11]

Think Before You Like[edit]

In a review in Skeptical Inquirer magazine, researcher Ben Radford writes that Harrison examines social media offering "practical advice on media literacy and cyber self-defense". Radford states that Chapter 2 might be the most relevant to skeptics trying to "understand the psychological and social consequences of social media". Think Before You Like was published in 2017 before information about how the power of social media was used in the US Presidential elections. Yet, according to Radford, "Harrison's book will only become more timely in the coming years".[12]

Bibliography[edit]

  • 50 reasons people give for believing in a god (2008)
  • Race and Reality: What Everyone Should Know about Our Biological Diversity (2010)
  • 50 Simple Questions for Every Christian (2013)
  • 50 Popular Beliefs that People Think are True (2013)
  • Think: Why You Should Question Everything (2013)
  • Good Thinking: What You Need to Know to be Smarter, Safer, Wealthier, and Wiser
  • What Makes Your Brain Happy and Why you Should do the Opposite (Prometheus Books, 2018)[13]
  • At Least Know This: Essential Science to Enhance Your Life (Prometheus Books, 2018)[14]
  • Think Before You Like: Social Media's Effect on the Brain and the Tools You Need to Navigate Your Newsfeed (2017)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Guy P. Harrison". infidels.org. 2014-01-28. 
  2. ^ "Guy P. Harrison – 50 Reasons People Give For Believing In A God". Point of inquiry. August 1, 2008. 
  3. ^ LinkedIn Guy P. Harrison Retrieved August 28, 2015
  4. ^ Psychology Today About Thinking Retrieved August 28, 2015
  5. ^ "Guy P. Harrison". guypharrison.com. 
  6. ^ "Guy P. Harrison". Sustainable Lens. 2013-10-31. 
  7. ^ "Skepticality Guest List". Skepticality. April 13, 2010. Retrieved February 24, 2014. 
  8. ^ Point of Inquiry August 1, 2008 Guy P. Harrison – 50 Reasons People Give For Believing In A God Retrieved August 27, 2015
  9. ^ Patheos.com June 20, 2008 Book Review: 50 Reasons People Give for Believing in a God by Guy P. Harrison Retrieved August 27, 2015
  10. ^ LinkedIn Guy P. Harrison Retrieved August 28, 2015
  11. ^ "Guy P. Harrison". Guest Profile. Skepticality. Retrieved February 24, 2014. 
  12. ^ Radford, Ben (2018). "This is Your Brain on Social Media". Skeptical Inquirer. Committee for Skeptical Inquiry. 42 (5): 62. 
  13. ^ Frazier, Kendrick (2018). "New and Notable". Skeptical Inquirer. Committee for Skeptical Inquirer. 42 (4): 61. 
  14. ^ Frazier, Kendrick (2018). "New and Notable". Skeptical Inquirer. Committee for Skeptical Inquirer. 42 (4): 60. 

External links[edit]