HMS D6

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History
RN Ensign
Name: HMS D6
Builder: Vickers Armstrong, Barrow-in-Furness
Laid down: 24 February 1910
Launched: 24 October 1911
Commissioned: 19 April 1912
Fate: Sunk 28 June 1918
General characteristics
Class and type: D class submarine
Displacement: Surfaced= 483 tons / Submerged= 595 tons
Length: 163.0 ft (49.7 m) (oa)
Beam: 13.6 ft (4.1 m) (oa)
Propulsion: 550hp electric 1750hp diesel twin screws
Speed: Surfaced=14.0 kts / Dived= 10.0 (design) 9.0 (service)
Range: Surface= 2500nm at 10 kts / Submerged=45nm at 5knots
Complement: 25
Armament: 3x18 in (46 cm) torpedo tubes (2 forward, one aft)

HMS D6 was one of eight D-class submarine built for the Royal Navy during the first decade of the 20th century.

Description[edit]

The D-class submarines were designed as improved and enlarged versions of the preceding C class, with diesel engines replacing the dangerous petrol engines used earlier. D3 and subsequent boats were slightly larger than the earlier boats. They had a length of 164 feet 7 inches (50.2 m) overall, a beam of 20 feet 5 inches (6.2 m) and a mean draught of 11 feet 5 inches (3.5 m). They displaced 495 long tons (503 t) on the surface and 620 long tons (630 t) submerged.[1] The D-class submarines had a crew of 25 officers and other ranks and were the first to adopt saddle tanks.[2]

For surface running, the boats were powered by two 600-brake-horsepower (447 kW) diesels, each driving one propeller shaft. When submerged each propeller was driven by a 275-horsepower (205 kW) electric motor. They could reach 14 knots (26 km/h; 16 mph) on the surface and 9 knots (17 km/h; 10 mph) underwater. On the surface, the D class had a range of 2,500 nautical miles (4,600 km; 2,900 mi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph).[2]

The boats were armed with three 21-inch (53.3 cm) torpedo tube, two in the bow and one in the stern. They carried one reload for each tube, a total of six torpedoes.[2]

Construction and career[edit]

D6 was laid down on 24 February 1910 by Vickers at their Barrow shipyard, launched 24 October 1911 and was commissioned on 19 April 1912. D6 was sunk by UB-73 73 miles north of Inishtrahull Island off the west coast of Ireland on 24 or 28 June 1918. There were two survivors who were taken prisoner.[3] Their post-war report apparently prompted the British to conclude that the torpedo that sank her had employed a magnetic pistol.[4]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Harrison, Chapter 4
  2. ^ a b c Gardiner & Gray, p. 87
  3. ^ NavalHistory.net
  4. ^ Admiralty. Annual Report of the Torpedo School, 1919, p. 22.

References[edit]

External links[edit]