HMS K11

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History
United Kingdom
Name: HMS K11
Builder: Armstrong Whitworth, Newcastle upon Tyne
Laid down: October 1915
Commissioned: February 1917
Fate: Sold, 4 November 1921
General characteristics
Class and type: K-class submarine
Displacement:
  • 1,980 long tons (2,010 t) surfaced
  • 2,566 long tons (2,607 t) submerged
Length: 339 ft (103 m)
Beam: 26 ft 6 in (8.08 m)
Draught: 20 ft 11 in (6.38 m)
Propulsion:
Speed:
  • 24 knots (44 km/h; 28 mph) surfaced
  • 8 knots (15 km/h; 9.2 mph) submerged
Range:
  • Surfaced :
  • 800 nmi (1,500 km; 920 mi) at 24 kn (44 km/h; 28 mph)
  • 12,500 nmi (23,200 km; 14,400 mi) at 10 kn (19 km/h; 12 mph)
  • Submerged :
  • 8 nmi (15 km; 9.2 mi) at 8 kn (15 km/h; 9.2 mph)
  • 40 nmi (46 mi; 74 km) at 4 kn (4.6 mph; 7.4 km/h)
Complement: 59 (6 officers and 53 ratings)
Armament:

HMS K11 was a K class submarine built by Armstrong Whitworth, Newcastle upon Tyne. K11 was laid down in October 1915, and commissioned in February 1917. It had a complement of 59 crew members.

In 1917, K11 was damaged by fire during a North Sea patrol. She was forced to surface and was towed by a destroyer. K11 was part of the disastrous Battle of May Island exercise. She was forced to take avoiding action to avoid K14, but survived the exercise. K11 was sold on the 4 November 1921.

Design[edit]

Like all British K-class submarines, K9 had a displacement of 1,800 long tons (1,800 t) when at the surface and 2,600 long tons (2,600 t) while submerged.[1] It had a total length of 338 feet (103 m), a beam of 26 feet 6 inches (8.08 m), and a draught of 20 ft 11 in (6.38 m).[2] The submarine was powered by two oil-fired Yarrow Shipbuilders boilers and one geared Brown-Curtis or Parsons steam turbine; this developed 10,500 ship horsepower (7,800 kW) to drive two 7 ft 6 in (2.29 m) screws. It also contained four electric motors each producing 350 to 360 horsepower (260 to 270 kW).[2] It was also fitted with a diesel engine providing 800 hp (600 kW) to be used when steam was being raised, or instead of raising steam.[3]

The submarine had a maximum surface speed of 24 kn (44 km/h; 28 mph) and a submerged speed of 9 to 9.5 kn (16.7 to 17.6 km/h).[2][4] It could operate at depths of 150 ft (46 m) at 2 kn (3.7 km/h) for 80 nmi (150 km).[1] K9 was fitted with a 3 inches (76 mm) anti-aircraft gun, ten 18-inch (460 mm) torpedo tubes, and two 4-inch (100 mm) deck guns.[2] Its torpedo tubes were fitted to the bows, the midship section, and two were mounted on the deck.[1] Its complement was fifty-nine crew members.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "K for Katastophe". Undersea Warfare Magazine. Archived from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 20 August 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c d Colledge, J. J.; Warlow, Ben (2006) [1969]. Ships of the Royal Navy: The Complete Record of all Fighting Ships of the Royal Navy (Rev. ed.). London: Chatham Publishing. ISBN 978-1-86176-281-8. OCLC 67375475. 
  3. ^ Anthony Bruce; William Cogar (27 January 2014). Encyclopedia of Naval History. Routledge. p. 356. ISBN 978-1-135-93534-4. 
  4. ^ a b Julian Holland (1 May 2012). Amazing & Extraordinary Facts Steam Age. David & Charles. p. 145. ISBN 1-4463-5619-1. 

Bibliography[edit]

  • Hutchinson, Robert. Submarines, War Beneath The Waves, from 1776 to the Present Day.