Haje Jan Kamps

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Haje Jan Kamps
Haje Jan Kamps testing his triggertrap with Nikon D40 by Beatrice Murch.jpg
BornMay 21, 1981
Leiderdorp, South Holland, Netherlands
CitizenshipDutch
Alma materLiverpool John Moores University
OccupationPhotographer, businessman, journalist, author, blogger, freelance writer
OrganizationTriggertrap, TechCrunch, Lifefolder, Bolt VC, Konf, ScreenCloud, Photocritic photography school
Notable work
The Rules of Photography (and when to break them), Shooting Yourself: Self-Portraits with Attitude!, Macro Photography Photo Workshop, Why Photographers Prefer Cloudy Days, Accelerated Startup
Spouse(s)Ziah Sarah Rebekah Fogel
Websitekamps.org

Haje Jan Kamps (born May 21, 1981) is a Dutch photographer,[1][2][3] author,[4] awards photo judge,[5][6] freelance writer,[7] businessman,[8][9][10] journalist,[11] inventor, and editor. Jan Kamps was the director of portfolio at Bolt VC,[12] a hardware-focused pre-seed and seed-stage venture capital firm interested on hardware startups and enabling technologies.[13][14][15] According to William A. Sahlman and Robert F. White of the Harvard Business School, experts on Entrepreneurial Management, Bolt VC resembled a new concept of seed venture capital firm built to serve the needs of early-stage startups at the intersection of hardware and software.[16] Kamps has also been a staff writer for TechCrunch and is still a frequent contributor to the news site.[17] His work on TechCrunch has been featured on Forbes.[18][19] From 2011 to 2017, Kamps acted as the Founder CEO of Triggertrap. He is currently the CEO of Konf, a platform for small and medium-size virtual conferences and events.[20] On the blog of the company registered at Medium, an online publishing platform, Kamps himself stated that a permanent behavior change was expected because of the COVID-19 pandemic[21] and people were likely to rely more on virtual conferencing, which may have some positive effects on the environment.[22][21][23] As an expert, he has been part of the panel of judges of the E! People's Choice Awards[24] and the Oslo Innovation Award.[25]

Background[edit]

Born on May 21, 1981 in Leiderdorp, South Holland, Netherlands, to parents Hielke Kamps and Lizeth Rovers, Haje moved to Norway in 1988 when he was seven years old, and to the UK in 2001 when he was nineteen.[citation needed] In England, he studied Journalism at Liverpool John Moores University,[26] and started a stint working in publishing, media and photography.[27] In 2017, he co-launched Lifefolder,[28][29] known for having launched Emily,[30][31] a Messenger Facebook chatbot designed to help people with end of life planning in North Carolina. Using artificial intelligence, Lifefolder aimed to normalize talking about death and prepare for the logistics of dying.[32][33][34][35] In December 2017, it was announced that the company was about to cease operations.[36]

Media career[edit]

In 1998, together with Martin Lexow Wirak, when Kamps was sixteen years old, he started Digitalkamera.no, a major Norwegian technology news website about digital photography which later evolved into akam.no.[verification needed][original research?]

In 2002, while working at Granada Television, on a Coronation Street specials series,[37] Kamps started a website called Photocritic, which gained notoriety in December 2005, when it was featured on Slashdot,[38] and subsequently got coverage on Digg.[39] In 2011, it was cited by author Jeremy Butler on his book 'Television Style'.[40]

The Photocritic.org website was later purchased by Sterling Publishing, and is now hosted at Pixiq, where Kamps posts regularly.[citation needed]

In 2007, Kamps wrote a book on macro photography for John Wiley & Sons publishing, entitled Macro Photography Photo Workshop (ISBN 978-0470118764). He has worked at Future Publishing as web editor and for Fast Car Magazine and T3 magazine as well.[verification needed] He later started working as a senior producer at Five, the UK-based TV channel. At Five, Kamps was the senior producer of the FiveFWD website.[citation needed]

Since then, Kamps is known for working as a freelance ghostwriter and media editorial consultant.[41] He has also acted as a guest in different photography competitions.[42] In 2011, he created Triggertrap, which was his main occupation until 2017, when the company ceased operations.[43]

Product development[edit]

In 2011, Kamps created the Triggertrap universal camera trigger,[44] a device based on the Arduino rapid prototyping platform. The Triggertrap was known for connecting cameras to various sources (light, laser, sound, or any other arbitrary source), and can be used to trigger the camera on a certain event. The Triggertrap project was crowd-funded[45] via the Kickstarter platform in July 2011, raising $77,262 - more than 3 times over its original $25,000 goal.[46]

In November 2013, the Triggertrap Ada was crowd-funded via Kickstarter, raising £290,386 though the original goal was £50,000.[47] On 2 March 2015, Triggertrap announced that they had failed to bring the product into production and that only the remaining 20% of the funds from the Kickstarter campaign would be returned to the original backers.[48][49]

Awards[edit]

  • 2008: Photocritic's can macro tube was awarded best DIY photography gadget on Lifehacker.[50]

Bibliography[edit]

Books[edit]

Other book credits[edit]

  • Project editor: Lights, Camera, Capture! by Bob Davis (ISBN 978-0470549537 / Published 2010)
  • Technical editor: HDR Photography Workshop by Pete Carr and Robert Correll (ISBN 978-0470549537 / Published 2009)
  • Technical editor: Creative Close-ups by Harold Davis (ISBN 978-0470527122 / Published 2009)
  • Technical editor: Digital Field Guides: Exposure by Alan Hess (ISBN 978-0470534908 / Published 2009)
  • Contributing Photographer: Photos that Inspire by Lynne Eodice (ISBN 978-0470119556 / Published 2007)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Interview with Haje Jan Kamps of Photocritic.org". petapixel.com. Archived from the original on 2016-03-06. Retrieved 2020-12-14.
  2. ^ Popular Photography March 2015 USA.
  3. ^ "Interview with Haje Jan Kamps of Triggertrap". petapixel.com. Archived from the original on 2014-10-22. Retrieved 2020-12-14.
  4. ^ Noble, Barnes. "Focus on Travel Photography: Focus on the Fundamentals (Focus On Series)|NOOK Book". Barnes & Noble. Archived from the original on 2020-12-15. Retrieved 2020-12-14.
  5. ^ Harry (2017-10-30). "2017 Visual 1st Awards Go to Photomyne, PastBook, V360, and Streetography". CultHub. Archived from the original on 2020-09-19. Retrieved 2020-12-14.
  6. ^ "2017 Visual 1st Awards Go to Photomyne, PastBook, V360, and Streetography". www.newswire.com. Archived from the original on 2020-09-28. Retrieved 2020-12-15.
  7. ^ "Haje Jan Kamps". Medium. Archived from the original on 2020-11-21. Retrieved 2020-12-14.
  8. ^ "UK Startups Have Gone Mad for MV Madness | 博客 | Microsoft for Startups". startups.microsoft.com. Archived from the original on 2020-12-15. Retrieved 2020-12-14.
  9. ^ "La compañía que ofreció vacaciones ilimitadas y fue un desastre (y no por el motivo más obvio)". es.finance.yahoo.com (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 2020-12-15. Retrieved 2020-12-15.
  10. ^ "Why tech industries are thriving in the south-west of England". the Guardian. 2014-02-10. Archived from the original on 2020-11-15. Retrieved 2020-12-15.
  11. ^ "Haje Jan Kamps, Author at Product Management Confabulation - Page 15 of 17". Product Management Confabulation. Archived from the original on 2020-12-15. Retrieved 2020-12-15.
  12. ^ "Bolt Ventures Investor Profile: Portfolio & Exits | PitchBook". pitchbook.com. Archived from the original on 2020-12-15. Retrieved 2020-12-15.
  13. ^ "Bolt raises $68 million to simplify ecommerce". VentureBeat. 2019-07-09. Archived from the original on 2020-10-30. Retrieved 2020-12-15.
  14. ^ "Bolt Raises $50M to Expand E-Commerce Checkout Platform". Built In San Francisco. Archived from the original on 2020-10-28. Retrieved 2020-12-15.
  15. ^ O'Brien, Kelly. "Bolt raises third venture fund dedicated to hardware tech". Biz Journals. Archived from the original on 2020-12-15. Retrieved 2020-12-15.
  16. ^ "BOLT: Seed Venture Capital Firm - Case - Faculty & Research - Harvard Business School". www.hbs.edu. Archived from the original on 2020-08-09. Retrieved 2020-12-15.
  17. ^ "Author: Haje Jan Kamps". TechCrunch. Archived from the original on 2020-12-15. Retrieved 2020-12-14.
  18. ^ Team, Trefis. "What Drives Value At Electric Scooter Sharing Startups Like Bird?". Forbes. Archived from the original on 2020-09-29. Retrieved 2020-12-14.
  19. ^ Garcia, Jon (2018). "Bird will pay you to gather and charge their electric scooters". The Tennessean. Archived from the original on 2020-12-15.
  20. ^ Vazquez, Tatiana. "Reconectando, de mala gana, con Facebook - Hyper Noir". Hypernoir (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 2020-12-15. Retrieved 2020-12-14.
  21. ^ a b Kamps, Haje Jan (2020-05-18). "Building the future of virtual conferences". Medium. Archived from the original on 2020-12-15. Retrieved 2020-12-15.
  22. ^ Hesham, Rana (2020-04-29). "Why it's time to get used to virtual conferences". Medium. Archived from the original on 2020-12-15. Retrieved 2020-12-15.
  23. ^ Kamps, Haje Jan (2020-05-18). "Building the future of virtual conferences". Medium. Archived from the original on 2020-12-15. Retrieved 2020-12-15.
  24. ^ Pocket-lint (2007-12-17). "Yahoo launches Finds of the Year 2007". Pocket-lint. Archived from the original on 2020-08-07. Retrieved 2020-12-14.
  25. ^ Flockett, Anna. "Warm tech startup selected as the 2020 recipient of Oslo Innovation Award". Startups Magazine. Archived from the original on 2020-12-15. Retrieved 2020-12-15.
  26. ^ "Alumni US | Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, United Kingdom". alumnius.net. Archived from the original on 2020-12-15. Retrieved 2020-12-14.
  27. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-08-31. Retrieved 2012-01-11.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  28. ^ "Chatbot apps help users prepare for death". BBC News. Retrieved 2020-12-16.
  29. ^ Business, Journal of Beautiful (2017-09-15). "Human of Beautiful Business: Haje Jan Kamps, Co-Founder and CEO, LifeFolder". Medium. Archived from the original on 2020-12-15. Retrieved 2020-12-14.
  30. ^ Öhman, Carl; Watson, David (2019-10-10). The 2018 Yearbook of the Digital Ethics Lab. Springer Nature. p. 171. ISBN 978-3-030-17152-0. Archived from the original on 2020-12-15. Retrieved 2020-12-14.
  31. ^ MOLST, advance directive, being mortal, death, dying, wills, hospice, healthcare proxy, advance care planning. "Meet Emily". GoodEnding Org. Archived from the original on 2020-12-15. Retrieved 2020-12-15.
  32. ^ "AI Robot Takes the Burden Out of End-of-Life Conversations - Debra Lee - EdLab". EdLab, Teachers College Columbia University. 2017-09-08. Retrieved 2020-12-14.
  33. ^ Vatomsky, Sonya (2017-11-27). "You're Going to Die—and This Bot Wants to Help You Prepare For It". Men's Health. Archived from the original on 2019-03-05. Retrieved 2020-12-14.
  34. ^ "Emily bot walks you through end-of-life decisions". VentureBeat. 2017-06-20. Archived from the original on 2020-11-14. Retrieved 2020-12-14.
  35. ^ LifeFolder. "LifeFolder launches chatbot to help people with end of life planning in North Carolina". www.prnewswire.com. Archived from the original on 2017-08-10. Retrieved 2020-12-14.
  36. ^ Kamps, Haje Jan (2020-07-23). "A fond farewell from LifeFolder". Medium. Archived from the original on 2020-10-29. Retrieved 2020-12-15.
  37. ^ "IMDB - Haje Jan Kamps". 2002. Archived from the original on 2020-12-15. Retrieved 2010-02-19.
  38. ^ "Macro Lens from a Pringles Can". 2005-12-12. Archived from the original on 2020-12-15. Retrieved 2008-12-14.
  39. ^ "Make a Macro Lens from a Pringles Can". Archived from the original on 2008-09-17. Retrieved 2008-12-14.
  40. ^ Butler, Jeremy G. (2010-04-05). Television Style. Routledge. ISBN 978-1-135-89069-8. Archived from the original on 2020-12-15. Retrieved 2020-12-15.
  41. ^ Kamps, Haje Jan. "Kamps Consulting". Kamps Consulting Ltd. Archived from the original on 2009-12-08. Retrieved 2009-11-01.
  42. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2012-01-11.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  43. ^ "R.I.P Triggertrap: Trigger Pioneer to Close Shop After Kickstarter Fail". petapixel.com. Archived from the original on 2020-11-12. Retrieved 2020-12-14.
  44. ^ Hannaford, Kat (2011-06-29). "Triggertrap Commands Cameras to Take Photos In Reaction to Pretty Much Anything". Gizmodo. Archived from the original on 2020-12-15. Retrieved 2011-11-24.
  45. ^ "Crowdfunded projects about crowdfunding draw few crowds". SFChronicle.com. 2014-05-08. Archived from the original on 2020-12-15. Retrieved 2020-12-14.
  46. ^ "Triggertrap time-lapse photography concept unveiled | TechRadar". 2017-03-13. Archived from the original on 2017-03-13. Retrieved 2020-12-15.
  47. ^ "Business 20 November 2013". Issuu. Archived from the original on 2016-09-06. Retrieved 2020-12-15.
  48. ^ Kamps, Haje Jan (2019-11-01). "How a half-million dollar Kickstarter project can crash and burn". Medium. Archived from the original on 2020-12-15. Retrieved 2020-12-15.
  49. ^ Kamps, Haje Jan (2015-01-22). "Hardware is Hard: Getting a Kickstarter project shipped". Medium. Archived from the original on 2020-11-13. Retrieved 2020-12-15.
  50. ^ Purdy, Kevin (2008-12-15). "Top 10 DIY Photography Tools". Archived from the original on 2020-12-15. Retrieved 2008-12-14.
  51. ^ Kamps, Haje Jan. "Kamps Consulting". Kamps Consulting Ltd. Archived from the original on 2010-09-23. Retrieved 2010-09-09.