Harby, Leicestershire

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Harby
Harby Leicestershire.JPG
Harby from the south - Waltham Road
Harby is located in Leicestershire
Harby
Harby
Harby shown within Leicestershire
OS grid reference SK7449331135
District
Shire county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town Melton Mowbray
Postcode district LE14
Dialling code 01949
Police Leicestershire
Fire Leicestershire
Ambulance East Midlands
EU Parliament East Midlands
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Leicestershire
52°52′20″N 0°53′35″W / 52.87221°N 0.89313°W / 52.87221; -0.89313Coordinates: 52°52′20″N 0°53′35″W / 52.87221°N 0.89313°W / 52.87221; -0.89313

Harby is a village and civil parish in the English county of Leicestershire. Harby is in the far north-east of the county in the Vale of Belvoir, 9.4 miles (15.1 km) north of the town of Melton Mowbray, and 13.9 miles (22.4 km) west south-west of the town of Grantham. The population at the 2011 census was included in the civil parish of Clawson, Hose and Harby. Although the village is in Leicestershire, the county town of Leicester is 21.4 miles (34.4 km) away; the closest city is Nottingham, 15.7 miles (25.3 km) away. The village is situated on the south side of the Grantham Canal.

Apart from Harby in Leicestershire there is a Harby, Nottinghamshire, Hårby in Denmark and a Harby near Kalmar in Sweden.

The seat of the Duke of Rutland, Belvoir Castle is 6 miles (9.7 km) north east from Harby.

Harby has a post office, village shop and cafe, all located at the village garage on Nether Street.

The village was served by Harby and Stathern railway station, opened in 1879 and closed in 1962. Harby is on the now-defunct Grantham Canal. A wharf was formerly used to ship grain from the village mill on Colston Lane.

Governance[edit]

Harby is in the Rutland and Melton constituency. The current Member of Parliament is Alan Duncan.

Harby shares its civil parish council with Long Clawson, Leicestershire, and Hose, Leicestershire to form Clawson, Hose and Harby Parish Council across three villages. The borough council is Melton Borough Council, and the county council is Leicestershire County Council.

History[edit]

Herdebi 1085 - Harby 2000

Old names for the village include Hereby, Herdby, Hedeby, and Harteby. The first element "Har" either derives from the old Scandinavian "hiorth" meaning herd, flock or the old Norse personal name "Herrothr", old Danish personal name "Heroth". The second element is the old Scandinavian "by" meaning a village or homestead.

The Domesday book of 1086 listed Harby as part of the possessions of .

Robert de Tosny. He owned 17 carucates of land at Harby. In the time of Edward the Confessor it was 14 ploughs. Three of these carucates were held directly by Robert with 8 slaves. 13 of the ploughs were leased to 24 freemen, 7 villagers and 3 smallholders. There were meadows measuring 5 furlongs long and 5 furlongs wide. This land now brought in £5 a year; it used to be £4. Robert de Bucy owns 1 carucute of land at Harby and leases it to Gerard. The land takes 1 plough to work it. Gerard sub-leases it to 2 freeman and 3 smallholders. Its value is 5 shillings.

In 1622 William Burton described Harby on page 127 of his book The Description of Leicester Shire.

"Harby, in olde deedes written Herdeby in the Hundred of Framland, standing in the Vale of Bever upon the border of Nottinghamshire. In the 20. yeere of Edward the third, William Lord Ros, and John de Oreby held lands heere. In the 44. yeere of Edward the third, Roger Delaware was Lord of this Mannor. In the 25. of Henry the eight the Lord Delaware was Lord of this Mannor as it appeareth by an Inquisition taken after the death of Sir John Digby Knight, in the said 25.yeere of Henry the eight, where it was found that the said Sir John Digby held 4. messuages (with the appurtenances in Harby ) of the said Lord Delaware, as of his Mannor of Harby. In this Towne was borne Jeffrey de Hardby a famous Dvuine, brought up in Oxford, and after became one of the Canons of the Abbey of Leicester; from whence hee came to be Confessor to King Edward the third, and was by him made one of his Privy Councell of state. He wrote many bookes of speciall note in Divinity, and died in London, and was buried in the Austin Fryers. Here also was borne Robert de Hardby, a Frier Carmelite in Lincolne, who wrote something in praise of the saide Order, and lived 1450.

Ecclesa de Herdeby Patronus Willimus de Albaniaco persona Mr.Robertus institutus per Hug.nunc Episcopum Lincoln.

The new Patron of this Church is Francis Earle of Rutland. This Rectory is valued in the Kings bookes at 20 pounds."

In 1815 John Nichols described Harby in his book The History and Antiquities of the County of Leicestershire.

"Harby, like many other villages in the Vale of Belvoir is destitute of woods and streams; no high road leads through or beside it. A heavy clay spreads over every acre in the parish and the uniform operations of husbandry give a sameness to the country, which a stranger might view with disgust; but cultivation has made it fruitful, and its inhabitants feel no envy at the variety of other soils, where the sterility of one part may balance the luxuriance of another. Industry here makes the prospect, and the produce alone is the beauty of the soil. There are about 1800 acres in the parish; and, whilst the field continued open, the method of tillage was, first year fallow; second, barley and wheat; third, beans and pease. The families of Harby are 60, its inhabitants 322, among whom are many small freeholders. There is no mansion or antient building in the village; but the present rector has lately built a neat and convenient house, the probable residence of his successors."

Harby Church of England Primary School[edit]

School in 1895
School in 2005

The present primary school began as a church school founded by the National Society for Promoting Religious Education. The society was established in 1811 to provide schools for poor children. The aim was to found a church school in every parish and by 1851 (still 20 years before the state took any responsibility for education) there were 12,000 schools across England and Wales. The first school was founded by the Rector William Evans Hartopp in about 1827, the exact date is not recorded. The land was given by John Manners 5th Duke of Rutland.

A trade directory for 1846 lists the schoolmaster as William Burnham. In the 1851 census record the schoolmaster is William Chandler and his wife Emma as schoolmistress.

A new School was built in 1860. It is thought to be on the site of the old village green. It was built by a church committee, headed by the Reverend Manners Octavius Norman. The school was opened on 25 March 1861. Two sermons were preached by the Reverend James Bardsley, Rector of St. Ann's Church, Manchester, on behalf of the building fund, in the Parish Church on 25 September 1861 at 11am and 3pm. The surveyors and architects were Bellamy and Hardy of Lincoln. The school was built with two main teaching classrooms, a large kitchen and water closets to the rear. Living accommodation for the teacher consisting of a downstairs study and three upper private rooms. The building cost £861 3s 4d. The first headmaster was Henry Major.

Originally there was a bell tower above the front door, of which only the base remains intact. A swan (the emblem of the school) and a book are carved either side of the base. In 1976 the school was extended to meet the needs of growing population in the area. Three new open plan classroom areas were added and the old kitchen was converted into a Studio and TV room. A new Kitchen was constructed at the rear of the old school and a large boiler house in the style of the old school was added.

The county council took over the management of the school on 1 July 1903.

Methodist Chapel[edit]

Methodists had begun to hold their own services from 1769 in their own homes, and in an old coach house given by William Orson for conversion into a chapel in April 1828. By 1847 the congregation had outgrown the coach house, and it was replaced by a Wesleyan Methodist chapel built on Orson's land. The foundation stone was laid by C.H. Clark, a Nottingham solicitor, and the opening sermons were preached by the Rev John Rattenbury and the Rev James Everett. In 1874 the chapel was refurbished and funded by a bazaar organised by Mrs Lever, Mrs Glover, Mrs Whittle, and Mrs Furmidge.[1]

A Centenary was held in 1929, at which the preacher was Rev Benson Perkins of Birmingham. In 1926 a new two manual pipe organ was installed. Built by Messrs E. Wragg & Son of Nottingham, at a cost of £210, it was removed when the chapel was modernised for its current use. The chapel is now used by the Vale Christian Fellowship.[1]

Parish Church of St Mary the Virgin[edit]

Church of St Mary the Virgin, Harby

Bells There are 5 bells in the tower dating from as early as 1610.

Bell Weight Note Diameter Cast Founder Inscription
1 4-2-21 D# 27.88" 1887 John Taylor & Co "JUBILEE 1887. GOD SAVE THE QUEEN" "CHRIST REIGNETH EVER" E. HALL. T.FRECK. WARDENS"
It cost £186 when cast and commemorates the Jubilee of Queen Victoria.
2 4-3-7 C# 29.25" 1610 Henry II Oldfield "JESUS BE OUR SPEED"
This was the pancake bell, rung at 11 a.m. on Shrove Tuesday to remind housewives to prepare the pancake mixture.
3 5-0-9 B# 30.75" 1610 Henry II Oldfield "GOD SAVE THE CHURCH"
4 7-2-0 A# 34.25" 1701 William Noone "GOD SAVE HIS CHURCH" R.WHITTLE. I. BROOKBANK. WARDENS.
5 8-2-16 G# 37.75" 1614 Henry II Oldfield "GLORY BE TO GOD ON HIGH".
The tenor or passing bell, rung to record a death. This bell is the heaviest in the tower.

Pipe Organ Installed in 1874 in the chancel, the organ faces into the choir. It was removed from Gedling Parish Church. Nottinghamshire. at a cost of £70 plus £11.1.0 for dismantling and rebuilding. The front gilded pipes are sham architectural and do not sound.[citation needed] The organ has one manual, one straight and flat pedal board, seven sounding stops and one coupler (Gt to Ped). The seven sounding stops are (Great) Stopped Diapason:Bass 8ft, Open Diapason 8ft, Flute 4ft, Fifteenth 2ft, Principle 4ft, Dulciana 8ft, (Ped) Pedal Bourdon 8ft. The organ is blown electrically from the rear, but can be operated by a brass manual hand pump.

Parish Registers A curious romance attaches to the fate of an earlier volume of Harby Parish Registers, long lost, even in Nichols' time. The skins of parchment of which it consisted are said to have been unstitched and wrapped round the trunk and limbs of the corpse of Anne Adcock, and so buried by her grandson, John Adcock, a man of eccentric character, in December, 1776. For the most part, of course, the information contained in this volume is for ever lost, but transcripts exist at Lincoln for the years 1604, 1606 to 1609 and 1618; and at Leicester for 1581, 1612, 1613, 1617, 1621, 1625 to 1629, 1632 to 1634, 1636 to 1638, 1661 to 1663, 1670, 1672, 1674 to 1683, 1685, 1687, 1688, 1690, 1691, and 1694 to 1700.

Priests John Nichols (printer) in one of his most important works, Nichols's monumental History and Antiquities of the County of Leicester lists priests at Harby from 1220.

Rector - 1220 Robert
Chaplain - 1235 William de Herdeby
Subdeacon - 1251 to 1275 Thomas de Bathon
Subdeacon - 1275 Lambert de Trikingham
1298 William de Keln
Rector – 1336 Gilbert
1373 Nicholas
Rector - 1468 William Reynolds
Rector - John
Rector - 1534 Robert Carleton
Rector - 1570 George Benett
1613 - John White
1647 - Thomas Dalby
1659 - William Stevens

Data obtained from:- Location: Parish (Church): Harby in "CCEd, the Clergy of the Church of England database" (Accessed online, 2 February 2014)
Rector - 1596-1598 Robert Snoden later became chaplain to James I in 1614, and Bishop of Carlisle in 1616.
Curate - 1662 Daniel Pepys (Appt Licensing)
Deacon - 1662-1701 Daniel Pepys
Rector - 1662-1703 Anthony Harwood (Unknown - MA)
Rector - 1638-1703 Richardus Johnson (Unknown - MA)
Curate - 1680 Edvardus Browne (Appt Licensing)
Preacher - 1687 Laur Howell (Appt Licensing)
Preacher - 1688 Gul Lewis (Appt Licensing)
Preacher - 1692 Robert Peete (Appt Licensing)
Curate - 1703 Johannes Vincent (Appt Licensing)
Rector - 1703-1739 John Major (Unknown - BA)
Curate - 1738 John Bugg (Appt Licensing)
Rector - 1739-1741 William Turvile (Unknown - BA)
Rector - 1741-1749 Samuel Kerchevall (St John's College Cambridge BA)
Rector - 1749-1751 Richard Stevens (St John's College Cambridge BA)
Curate - 1751 Richard Stoup (Appt Licensing)
Rector - 1751-1763 William Cant (Queen's College Cambridge BA)
Curate - 1792-1813 Daniel Wagstaff (Appt Licensing)
Rector - 1763-1804 Bennet Storer (Trinity College Cambridge BA)
Rector - 1804-1826 Thomas Norris (Trinity College Cambridge BA)
Rector - 1826-1852 William Evans Hartopp (Trinity College Cambridge BA)
Rector - 1852-1899 Manners Octavius Norman Rural Dean, Framland III Deanery, 1872 to 1885
Rector - 1899-1925 Edward Henry Stone

Data obtained from:- Crockford’s Clerical Directory and supplied by the Library of Lambeth Palace.

Rector - 1926-1946 Arthur Evelyn Furnival (Exeter College Oxford BA)
Rector - 1946-1949 William Paul Watkins (Lincoln College Oxford BA)
Rector - 1949-1959 Alfred Cuthbert Holden (University of St. Andrew MA)
Rector - 1959-1961 Charles Brian Underwood (University of Leeds BA)
Rector - 1961-1963 Joseph Henry Dransfield - Not listed in Crockford’s Clerical Directory.
Rector - 1964-1974 Ieuan Delvin Powell (University of Wales BA)
Priest in Charge - 1975-1977 John Sydney Savige
Rector - 1977-1989 John Sydney Savige
Rector - 1990-1994 Simon Bailey
Curate - 1994-1998 Mark Turner (Sarum and Wells Theological College)
Priest in Charge - 1994-1998 Geoffrey Spencer (Nottingham University)
Curate - 1997-1999 David Francis Mills (Oak Hill Theological College)
Priest in Charge - 1999 and Team Rector 2000-2004 Charles Anthony Bradshaw (Birmingham University)
Team Rector - 2000-2008 Robin Duncan Stapleford (St. John’s College, Nottingham)
Curate - 2002-2005 Stephen Patrick James Burnham (Christ Church, Oxford)
Priest in Charge - 2005-2009 Stuart Jack Foster (Oak Hill Theological College)
Team Vicar - 2009 to present Frederick Philip Richard John Connell (St John’s College, Nottingham)

People[edit]

Samuel Levis was born in Harby on 30 September 1649, the son of Christopher Levis. Married on 4 May 1680 to Elizabeth Claytor, he received a Quaker certificate of removal in July 1684 and arrived in Pennsylvania by 4 November 1684. Levis died between 4 October 1728 (the date of his will) and 13 April 1734 (date of probate).

Harby farm labourer Kemp, born in 1884, was recorded in 1956 by the University of Leeds, talking about sheep shearing, washing, dipping and the price of a fleece.[2]

War Memorial[edit]

War Memorial

The war memorial cross was erected to honour the Harby soldiers and sailors who participated in World War I.

A committee was formed in the village to get drawings and estimates. The accepted plans were drawn up by Mr T. Burbidge, and the work was entrusted to Mr S. Squires of Bingham. The total height is nearly fifteen feet, the lower of the two bases being eight feet square. The stone above is four feet square and two feet in height containing ninety-nine names, nineteen on the front face being those who were killed in action or died on service. The remaining eighty names are those who also enlisted from the village and survived. Surrounding this stone is an old shaft and base from the ancient village cross. This is capped with a new cross from a suggested design of what the original may have looked like, and drawn by a former rector of the village, the Rev. Manners Octavius Norman. The whole of the structure, both old and new, is of Portland stone. It is particularly fitting that the old pillar should be used as this relic of the old village cross stood originally on the village green, not many yards from its present position. When the school was built in 1860 it was removed into the churchyard where it had stood until used as this memorial.

The unveiling ceremony took place on the night of Thursday, 20 May 1920, and was performed by the Rev. E. H. Stone, Rector, in the presence of two hundred people. An impressive service was held before the dedication, in which the church and chapel choirs sang. Sixty ex-service men formed a guard of honour. The Rev. Stone, in the course of his address, expressed his gratitude to the ex-service men of the village for the part they had played in the winning of the war. The Rev. C. T. Lander, Wesleyan Minister, Long Clawson, said it would have been impossible to erect a more fitting Memorial.

ERECTED BY THE PARISHIONERS IN MEMORY OF THOSE WHO FOUGHT IN THE GREAT WAR 1914 - 1919.

BAILEY J. T . COOK E. DEWEY E. GOODSON B. GREAVES W. H. HALL H. HAND B. HOYES F. A. M. M. HOYES J. KEMP T. A. ABBOTT F. W. MOULDS C. H. MOULDS G. H . D.C. M. RAWLINGS T. SMITH J. STOKES A. WESSON F. WOODFORD L. WRIGHT W.

OFFERED UPON THE ALTAR OF THE NATION

After the 1939-45 war, two names of men who did not return were carved on the base. The arrow marks where the new cross was fitted to the old. The steel brace which joins the two part together was made by Mr Martin Stead, the village blacksmith."

AND IN MEMORY OF THOSE WHO DIED IN THE 2ND WORLD WAR 1939 - 1945

DEWEY A. C. MABBOTT J. W.

Public Houses[edit]

Originally there were three public houses.

The Marquis of Granby was situated opposite the Junction of Boyers Orchard on Stathern Lane. The pub was one of many named after John Manners, Marquess of Granby. It is said that he aided soldiers of his regiment, the Royal Horse Guards, that were no longer able to serve to become publicans. Although the building still stands as a private residence the pub ceased trading some time between 1871 and 1881.

The White Hart was situated on Main Street and traded opposite the Nags Head. For many years like the Nags Head it was managed by Home Breweries at Nottingham. Since the closing of the White Hart in 2005 the building has been demolished and a new housing complex built.

The Nags Head is one of the oldest buildings in the village and is reputed to be one of the oldest public houses in Leicestershire. There is some belief that the building was once a priest house and evidence of a priest hole can be seen in one of the upper rooms. This building is one of the best examples of early timber frame construction in the area.

The Nags Head is now the only trading public house in the village.

Directory and Gazetteer Extracts[edit]

Extract from The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales (1840–1843)

HARBY, a parish in the hund. Of Framland, union of Melton-Mowbray, co. of Leicester ; 8 miles (13 km) north of Melton-Mowbray, and intersected by the Nottingham and Grantham canal. Living, a rectory, formerly in the archd. of Leicester and dio. of Lincoln, now in the dio. of Peterborough ; rated at £20 ; gross income £497. Patron in 1835, the duke of Rutland. There is a daily school here. Charities, in 1836, £13 16s. per annum Poor rates, in 1838, £196 10s. Acres 2,800. Houses 96. A. P. £2,566. Pop. In 1801, 343 ; in 1831, 488.

Harby White's county directory (1846)

HARBY, a considerable village, pleasantly situated in the Vale of Belvoir, on the south side of the Grantham Canal, 8 miles N. of Melton Mowbray, and 12 miles S. E. of Nottingham, has in its parish 629 souls, and 1910 acres of land, of which 880a. is arable, 975a. pasture, 46 1/2 a. fox cover and plantations, and 8 1/2 a. canal. During the last two years 49 of the parish have emigrated to Australia, & etc. The soil is chiefly a heavy clay, and the surface flat. The Duke of Rutland is lord of the manor, anciently called Herdebi, but part of the land belongs to Thos. Manners, Esq. and the Orson, Shipman, Musson, Dunmore, and other families. The manor has been held by various families and was sold by Andrew Collins, in 1642, to the earl of Rutland, though part of it was held, in 1086, by Robert de Todenei, the first Norman lord of Belvoir. The CHURCH (St.Mary) is a neat structure, with a square tower, containing four bells and a clock. The latter was given by the Duke and Duchess of St. Albans, in commemoration of their marriage, which was solemnised here May 29, 1839. They also gave £30, which is invested at interest for the use of the poor. The interior of the church was fitted with a new pulpit and sittings in 1834, and the stove was the gift of E. B. Hartopp, Esq., in 1841. The rectory, valued in K. B. at £20, and in 1831, at £497, is in the patronage of the Duke of Rutland, and the incumbency of the Rev. Wm. Evans Hartopp, M.A., who has a neat residence, and 455a. of land, awarded, in lieu of tithes, at the enclosure in 1790, when 16a. 2r. 35p., was allotted for the repairs of the church, and is now let for £24. 10s. to five cottagers. The National School was built by the rector a few years go, and there is a Wesleyan Chapel. On the canal is a wharf, with large granaries, built in 1836. The poor have about £8. 8s. A year from Chester’s Charity, and the interest of £10, left by the Rev. John Major, in 1739. The parish feast is on the Sunday after September 19. Adcock Mr John Burnham Wm. schoolmaster. Garton Thomas, police officer. Gibson John, stonemason. Goodson Thomas, clerk. Hallett Geo. vict. Marquis Granby. Hartopp Rev Wm. Evans, M.A., Rectory. Haywood John, vict. White Hart. Julian Richard, maltster. Lamin Henry, baker, &c. Orson Mrs Ann Welch John, tailor. Whittle John, vict. Nag's Head. Wright Edward, surveyor of Grantham canal, and coal dealer. Blacksmiths.Hall Edmund. Kemp Thomas. Kemp Wm. Boat Owners.Gregg Samuel.Smart Wm. Corn Millers. Bonser Henry Lamin Thos. (and wharfinger) Grocers, &c.Baguley Thomas. Freck John. Dickman Joseph FARMERS.* are Owners. Barlow James. Barnes Wm. Blount Thomas. *Dunmore Wm. *Doughty Levi. Freck James. Goodson Robert, Manor House. Hall George. Jackson Mattw. (and butcher). Kemp Thomas. Musson Mary. * Orson John. *Shipman Wm. Thompson John. Watchorn Thos. Watchorn James Whittle Ann. Joiners.Hitchcock John, (& wheelwgt.) Musson Samuel. Musson George Shoemakers. Geeson George. Gibson John CARRIER. John Hardy, to Melton, Tues.& Nottingm. Sat.

A Topographical Dictionary of England - Samuel Lewis (1848)

HARBY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Melton-Mowbray, hundred of Framland, N. division of the county of Leicester, 8¾ miles (N.) from Melton-Mowbray; containing 629 inhabitants. It comprises about 2,000 acres (8.1 km2). The soil is a stiffish clay, but, under good management, fertile and productive; the surface is chiefly level, except towards the eastern boundary, which forms part of the range of hills skirting the Vale of Belvoir. The Nottingham and Grantham canal intersects the parish. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £20; net income, £469; patron, the Duke of Rutland. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1790, when 300 acres (1.2 km2) were assigned. The church is in the early English style, and was repaired and new-pewed in 1840. Here are several chalybeate springs; and in the village is an ancient stone cross.

Extract from the Post Office Directory (1849)

Harby, a large village and Parish in Framland Hundred, Melton Union, and North Leicestershire, containing 629 Inhabitants and 1,910 acres (7.7 km2) of land, Chiefly a heavy clay. The village is pleasantly situated on the south side of the Grantham Canal, and in the Vale of Belvoir, 8¾ miles from Melton Mowbray Station, and 12 south-eastern from Nottingham. The living is a rectory of the annual value of £497, with a house, in the archdeaconry of Leicester, diocese of Peterborough, and patronage of the Duke of Rutland, Lord of the manor; the Rev. William Evens Hartopp, M.A., is the present incumbent. At the enclosure, in 1790, about 455 acres (1.84 km2) of land were awarded in lieu of tithes. The Church dedicated to St. Mary, is a neat building, with a square tower, 4 bells and a clock, and the inside has been recently repaired. The Wesleyan Methodists have a place of here, and a neat National School was erected a few years ago by the rector. The Grantham canal passes near the village. In 1739, the Rev, John Major left £10 for the poor of this parish, who also receive £8 8s. Per annum from the Chester Charity, of Barkstone. There is a wharf and granaries on the canal. About 50 persons emigrated to Australia within two years from this township. Hartopp Rev. William Evens, M.A Traders:- Adcock John, farmer. Baguley Thomas, grocer & baker. Barlow James, farmer. Barnes william, farmer. Barnes William, jun. farmer. Bonser Henry, miller, grazier & wharfinger. Dickman joseph, grocer. Dunsmore William, farmer. Freck James Sen. farmer. Freck James, jun. farmer. Freck John, shopkeeper. Gibson John Bricklayer. Goodson Robert, farmer. Greg Samual, boat owner. Hall Edmund, blacksmith. Hall George, farmer. Hallett George, 'Marquis of Granby'. Haywood John 'White Hart', farmer & coal dealer. Hitchcock John, wheelwright. Hourd Richard, farmer. Jackson Matthew, farmer & butcher. Julian Richard, farmer. Kemp Richard, farmer. Kemp William, grazier. Lamin Henry, grocer & baker. Lamin Thomas, miller, farmer & wharfinger. Monks James, Shoemaker, Musson James, Carpenter. Musson Miss Frances, Dressmaker. Musson Mrs. Mary, farmer. Musson Samuel carpenter. Orson John, farmer. Roslin Jonathan, farmer. Rouse John, carpenter. Shipman William, farmer. Sumner Mark, Shoemaker. Thomson John, farmer. Watchorn James, farmer. Watchorn Thomas, farmer. Welch John, tailor. Whittle Mrs. Ann, farmer. Whittle Mrs. Elizabeth, 'Nag's Head,' & farmer. Wright Edward, canal agent & wharfinger. Post Office.- Henry Lamin, receiver. Letters arrive through the Melton office at 12 at noon; dispatched ½ past 2p.m. National School, William Chandler, Master CARRIER.- John Hardy, to Melton on tues.; & to Nottingham on sat

Post Office Directory of Leicestershire & Rutland,(1855) page 45

HARBY is a township, large village, and parish, in Framland Hundred, Melton Union, North Leicestershire, containing, in 1851, 640 inhabitants, and 1,910 acres of land, chiefly a heavy clay. The village is pleasantly situated on the south side of the Grantham canal, and in the vale of Belvoir, 8 3/4 miles north from Melton Mowbray station, and 14 south-east from Nottingham. The living is a rectory, of the annual value of £600, with a house, in the archdeaconry of Leicester, diocese of Peterborough, and patronage of the Duke of Rutland, lord of the manor; the Rev. Manners Octavius Norman, m.a., is the present incumbent. At the enclosure, in 1790, about 455 acres of land were awarded in lieu of tithes. The church, dedicated to St. Mary, is a neat building, with a square tower, 4 bells, and a clock, which was presented by the Duke of St. Albans. The Wesleyan Methodists have a place of worship here, and a neat National school was erected a few years ago by the late rector. The Grantham canal passes near the village. In 1739 the Rev. John Major left £10 for the poor of this parish, who also receive £7 6s. 8d. per annum from Chester's charity, of Barkstone. Mrs. Orson left £20, to which the Duke of St. Albans added £30, the interest of which, with other small charities amounting to £62, to be applied for the benefit of the poor, at the discretion of the rector. There are a wharf and granaries on the canal. GENTRY.Norman Rev. Manners Octavius, b.a.[rector] Norman Robert Manners, esq TRADERS. Adcock John, farmer. Baguley Thomas, baker. Barlow John, farmer. Barnes William, jun. farmer. Barnes William, sen. farmer. Bonser Henry, miller, grazier & wharfinger. Cook William, farmer. Dickman Joseph, shopkeeper. Dunsmore Richard, farmer. Freck Elizabeth (Mrs.), shopkeeper. Freck James, corn merchant. Freck James, jun. farmer. Freck James, sen. farmer. Furmidge Samuel, corn merchant. Gibson John, bricklayer. Goodson Robert, farmer. Greeg Samuel, boat owner. Green John, canal agent & wharfinger. Hall Edmund, blacksmith. Haywood John, ' White Hart,' farmer & coal dealer Hitchcock John, wheelwright. Hourd Richard, farmer. Jackson Matthew, farmer & butcher. Kemp Richard, farmer. Kemp William, grazier. Lamin Henry, grocer, baker & postmstr. Lamin Thomas, maltster & wharfinger. Monks James, shoemaker. Musson Frances (Miss), dressmaker. Musson John, carpenter. Musson Mary (Miss), farmer. Musson Samuel, carpenter. Orson John, farmer & grazier. Richards Wm. 'Marquis of Granby'. Roslin Jonathan, farmer. Shipman William, farmer. Sumner Mark, shoemaker. Watchorn James, farmer. Watchorn Thomas, farmer. Wesser George, parish clerk. Wessor James, tailor. Whittle Ann (Mrs.), farmer. Whittle John, 'Nag's Head,' &. farmer Post Office.— Henry Lamin, receiver. Letters arrive through the Melton office at 12 at noon ; dispatched at 3 p.m. The nearest money order office is at Melton Mowbray. National School, William Chandler, master. Carriers—William Watchorn, to Melton, on Tuesday ; & to Nottingham, on Saturday. Samuel Starbuck, to Melton, on Tuesday.

Extract from the John Marius Wilson's Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales, 1870-1872 - (1871)

HARBY, a village and a parish in Melton-Mowbray district, Leicester. The village stands on the Grantham canal, in the vale of Belvoir, near the boundary with Notts, 8½ miles N of Melton-Mowbray r. station; and has a post office under Melton-Mowbray. The parish comprises 2, 800 acres (3.2 km2). Real property, £3,869. Pop., 655. Houses, 136. The property is much subdivided. The living is a rectory in the diocese of Peterborough. Value, £469. Patron, the Duke of Rutland. The church is a neat edifice with a tower; but is not in good repair. There are a Wesleyan chapel, a national school, and charities £10.

Extract from the White's Leicester and Rutland Directory 1877

HARBY, a parish and a considerable village, is pleasantly situated in the Vale of Belvoir, on the south side of the Grantham Canal, 8 miles (13 km) N. of Melton Mowbray, and 14 miles (23 km) S.E. by E. of Nottingham. Its parish, which is in Framland hundred, Melton Mowbray Union and County Court District, in 1871. 539 persons, living in 129 houses, on 2,800 acres (11 km2) of land. The parish has a rateable value of £8091 The soil is chiefly a heavy clay, and the surface flat. On the canal is a wharf, with large granaries, built in 1886. The Duke of Rutland is lord of the manor, anciently called .Herdebi, but part of the land ~ Messrs. John Smith, Andrew Shipman, John Whittle, M. Orson, William Shipman, and Thomas and W. Lamin. The manor has been held by various families, and was sold by Andrew Collins, in 1642, to of Rutland, though part of it was held in 1086 by Robert de Todenei, the first Norman Lord of Belvoir. The Church (St. Mary) consists of nave, chancel, north and south aisles, south porch, and a square tower, containing four bells and a clock. The latter was given by the Duke and Duchess of St. Albans, in commemoration of their marriage, which was solemnised here May 29, 1839. The architecture is chiefly of the Perpendicular period. The nave and south aisles were thoroughly restored, at an outlay of £1200, in 1874. In 1875-6, the church was newly roofed, the floor laid with encaustic tiles, and other improvements effected, at a cost of £460, defrayed by the rector. The tower is separated from the nave by an oak screen. The font, which stands in the south aisle, bears the date 1609, and is in the Decorated style. The organ was erected at a cost of £80. The benefice is a rectory, valued in K.B. at £20, and now at £469 per annum, and is in the patronage of the Duke of Rutland, and incumbency of the Rev. Manners Octavius Norman, B.A., who has a neat residence and 459A. 8r. 9p. of land, awarded in lien of tithes, at the enclosure, in 1793, when 16A. 2R. 35r. was allotted for the repairs of the church, and is now let for £42 to two cottagers. The WESLEYANS have a chapel here, built in 1847, at a cost of £400, principally contributed by the late Mr. John Orson, who also gave the site. The NATIONAL SCHOOL is a handsome stone building, erected in 1860 at an expense of nearly £1000, raised by subscription and grants. It is attended by about 80 children. The poor have about £8 8s. a year from Chester's Charity (see Barkestone), and the interest of £10 left by the Rev. John Major, in 1739. They have also the interest of £40 given by the Duke and Duchess of St Albans on the occasion of their marriage; and the interest of £10 left by Mrs. Hannah Thompson, in 1868. The parish feast is on the Sunday after September 19.

POST, MONEY ORDER and TELEGRAPH OFFICE, and SAVINGS' BANK at Mr. C. J. Watchorn's. Letters are received at 9 a.m. and despatched at 4 p.m. via Melton Mowbray.

Baguley George, cattle dealer & grazr Baguley William, grazier Barks Robert, farmer and glazier Barnes William, farmer and grazier Bonser Mr William Hall Brown John, bootmaker Dickman William. grocer, plumber, glazier and tinplate worker Freck Mrs Catherine, fmr. and grazer Freck James, farmer and grazier Freck Thomas, grocer and glazier Furmidge Mr Samuel Furmidge William and Samuel, corn. cake and coal merchants Gibson John, grocer, grader, bricklayr and contractor and parish clerk Goodson Robert, farmer and grazer Greenwood John, coal dealer Gregg Mr Samuel Gregg Thomas, boat owner Hall Edmund, blacksmith and steam threshing machine proprtr. & grazier Harwood William, farmer & glazier Haywood John, grazier Haywood John, jun. grazier and vict. White Hart Hitchcock Mr Samuel Jackson Mrs Elizabeth Jackson John, butcher and farmer Kemp George, farmer and grazier Kemp Thomas, carrier Kemp William, glazier King Mr John Lamin Henry, farmer & steam threshing machine proprietor Lamin Hy. jun. (L.& Shipman),& grzr Lamin John (L. & Shipman) Lamin Thomas, maltster and farmer and grazier Lamins and Shipman, corn millers,and corn, cake and coal merchants Manchester Thomas, farm baliff Marshall John, farmer and grazier Martin Samuel, joiner & wheelwright Moulds Henry, steam threshing machine proprietor Musson John. joiner and builder Musson Mrs Mary Musson Samuel, Joiner & wheelwright Norman Rev Manners Octavius, B.A. rector, The Rectory Orson Robert, fmr. & glazier; h Hose Rose Valentine, boot maker Rose William, grazier Shipman William, farmer and brick and tile manufacturer and road surveyor for Belvoir Shipman William, jun. Corn miller, &c. (Lamins & S,); h Hose Starbuck Samuel, farmer, grazier, cab proprietor and carrier Stokes Henry, draper Stretton Thomas (S. & Young) Stretton & Young, chemical manure manufacturers Watchorn William John, grocer, baker and postmaster Welsh Alfred, tailor Whitaker Win. grocer, draper & tailor Whittle John, farmer and grazier Whittle John, farmer, grazier and victualler, Nag's Head Young Joseph, chemical manure manufacturer (Stretton & Y.); h Sheffield CARRIERS-Thomas Kemp & Samuel Starbuck, to Melton, Tuesday, and to Nottingham Wed. and Saturday

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Harby Methodist Chapel". Harby Village. Retrieved 2012-09-24. 
  2. ^ Ellis, Stanley. "Harby, Leicestershire- Survey of English Dialects". sounds.bl.uk. British Sound Library. Retrieved 8 December 2016. 

External links[edit]