Hypericum maculatum

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Hypericum maculatum
Geflecktes Johanniskraut.jpg
Bombus soroeensis - Hypericum maculatum - Keila.jpg
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Rosids
Order: Malpighiales
Family: Hypericaceae
Genus: Hypericum
Section: Hypericum sect. Hypericum
Species:
H. maculatum
Binomial name
Hypericum maculatum

Hypericum maculatum, commonly known as imperforate St John's-wort,[1]:340[2] or spotted St. Johnswort,[3] is a species of perennial herbaceous flowering plant in the family Hypericaceae. It is native to Europe and Western Asia where it grows in moist meadows.

Description[edit]

Hypericum maculatum is a hairless perennial herbaceous plant growing to about 60cm. The stem is square in cross section, but without the wings shown in H. tetrapterum. The leaves are simple, entire (undivided) and in opposite pairs, without stipules and have few or no translucent glands. There may be black dots on the leaves, petals and sepals.[1] The flowers are yellow, up to about 25mm across. The species hybridises with Hypericum perforatum to produce Des Etang's St John's wort, Hypericum x desetangsii.[1]

Uses[edit]

It is considered to be a medicinal plant.[4] Hypericum maculatum herb has been used in the traditional Austrian medicine internally as tea or oil extract, and externally as oil extract, ointment or cold maceration in ethanol for treatment of disorders of the skin, locomotor system, nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, respiratory tract, kidneys and urinary tract, cardiovascular system, infections, rheumatism and gout.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Stace, C. A. (2010). New Flora of the British Isles (Third ed.). Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 9780521707725.
  2. ^ "BSBI List 2007". Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland. Archived from the original (xls) on 2015-01-25. Retrieved 2014-10-17.
  3. ^ "Hypericum maculatum". Natural Resources Conservation Service PLANTS Database. USDA. Retrieved 15 May 2015.
  4. ^ Băcilă, I., et al. (2010). Micropropagation of Hypericum maculatum Cranz an important medicinal plant. Rom Biotechnol Lett 15 86-91.