James M. Cannon

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Jim Cannon
White House Domestic Affairs Advisor
In office
February 28, 1975 – January 20, 1977
PresidentGerald Ford
Preceded byKenneth Reese Cole Jr.
Succeeded byStuart E. Eizenstat
Personal details
Born(1918-02-26)February 26, 1918[1]
Sylacauga, Alabama, U.S.
DiedSeptember 15, 2011(2011-09-15) (aged 93)
Arlington County, Virginia, U.S.
Political partyRepublican
EducationUniversity of Alabama (BS)

James M. Cannon was a historian, author and former Assistant to the President of the United States for Foreign Affairs during the Gerald Ford administration.[2] Prior to his work with Ford, he served as an aide to both Governor of New York and Vice President, Nelson D. Rockefeller after a career as a journalist.[3][4] After leaving the White House at the end of the Ford Administration, Cannon became Ford's official biographer, publishing Time and Chance: Gerald Ford's Appointment with History.[5][3][6]

Career[edit]

Cannon served in the United States Army 1939–1940 and 1941–1946.[4]

After his discharge from the army, he worked as a reporter for the Potsdam Herald-Recorder in Potsdam, New York, from 1947 to 1948, then the Gloversville Leader-Republican in Gloversville, New York, from 1948 to 1949.[4] After that, he worked as a reporter for the Baltimore Sun from 1949 to 1954.[4] He was a contributing editor for Time magazine from 1954 to 1956.[4]

From 1956 to 1969, he held a number of positions at Newsweek magazine including National Affairs Editor, Washington correspondent, Chief of Correspondents, and Vice President and Assistant to the Publisher.[4]

From 1969 to February 1975, Cannon worked in various positions as an aide to Nelson A. Rockefeller, through his tenure as Governor of New York and Vice President of the United States.[4]

In February 1975, he became Assistant to the President for Domestic Affairs and Executive Director of the Domestic Policy Council, a position he kept until January 1977, the end of the Ford Administration.[4]

After leaving the White House, he held several positions supporting United States Senator Howard Baker until 1981.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ James M. Cannon at Find a Grave
  2. ^ Shirley Anne Warshaw (March 27, 2013). Guide to the White House Staff. SAGE Publications. p. 309. ISBN 978-1-4522-3432-8.
  3. ^ a b "JAMES M. CANNON RESEARCH INTERVIEWS AND NOTES, 1989-94". Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library & Museum. National Archives and Records Administration. Retrieved January 28, 2017.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i "JAMES M. CANNON PAPERS, 1974-79". Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library & Museum. National Archives and Records Administration. Retrieved January 28, 2017.
  5. ^ James M. Cannon (1998). Time and Chance: Gerald Ford's Appointment with History. University of Michigan Press. ISBN 0-472-08482-8.
  6. ^ https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/james-m-cannon-iii-former-newsweek-editor-and-ford-adviser-dies-at-93/2011/09/17/gIQAWsAgaK_story.html
Political offices
Preceded by
Kenneth Reese Cole Jr.
White House Domestic Affairs Advisor
1975–1977
Succeeded by
Stuart E. Eizenstat