Janine van Wyk

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Janine van Wyk
Janine-van-wyk-042217.png
van Wyk, April 2017
Personal information
Full name Janine van Wyk
Date of birth (1987-04-17) 17 April 1987 (age 31)
Place of birth Alberton, South Africa
Height 162 cm (5 ft 4 in)[1]
Playing position Defender
Club information
Current team
Houston Dash
Number 5
Youth career
Springs Home Sweepers
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
Moroko Swallows
Palace Super Falcons
2013–2016 JvW
2017– Houston Dash 37 (0)
National team
2005– South Africa 149 (11)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 18 August 2018

Janine van Wyk (born 17 April 1987) is a South African women's footballer, Captains the Senior National team and plays as a defender. She plays for Houston Dash in the National Women's Soccer League, becoming the first South African player signed to this league. In March 2016, van Wyk recorded 149* caps for the South Africa women's national football team, and holds the record as the most capped South African football player of any gender.

Early life[edit]

Van Wyk was born in Alberton, Gauteng.[2] She grew up in Germiston and she started playing soccer at the age of 6. She attended Hoërskool Alberton, an Afrikaans medium school that did not play soccer. Her first girls team was Springs Home Sweepers based in KwaThema.[3]

Career[edit]

Club[edit]

A few years later, she joined [Moroko Swallows and later, Palace Super Falcons from Tembisa, where she was part of a team that won three consecutive league titles. Van Wyk called her time with the Super Falcons "memorable", and said that in the three league victories they were "untouchable". She then founded her own club, named JVW F.C..[3] She previously served as player-coach for the club.[4] Fans of football have nicknamed her "Booth".[3] On December 21, 2016 she signed with the Houston Dash.

International[edit]

Van Wyk made her national team debut in 2005 against Nigeria in the African Women's Championship. Van Wyk scored a stunning free kick when Banyana recorded their first ever win over Nigeria since the women’s national team was formed in 1993. Van Wyk scored the only goal of that match, with Banyana knocking Nigeria out of the 2012 African Women's Championship.[5] She was a member of the South African team who played at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, United Kingdom. She said she was proud to represent her country at an Olympic Games, despite the team being knocked out in the first round.[6]

Van Wyk played her 100th cap for South Africa against Namibia, winning 2–0 in August 2014.[7] At the time, she was not the most capped South African women's player as her teammate Portia Modise won her 110th cap in the same match.[8]

On 28 March 2016, she became South Africa's most capped player (male or female) when she made her 125th appearance against Cameroon.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Women's Olympic Football Tournament London 2012 – List of Players South Africa" (PDF). FIFA. 24 July 2012. Retrieved 19 October 2014.
  2. ^ "All eyes on Rio for Janine". Alberton Record. 7 October 2015. Retrieved 17 November 2016.
  3. ^ a b c Mukwevho Ne-vumbani, Victor (30 May 2014). "Banyana Banyana defender aims high". The Tembisan.
  4. ^ "Banyana captain gives back to football". southafrica.info. 29 April 2013.
  5. ^ "Van Wyk set for Banyana Banyana century – News – Kick Off". KickOff. 9 August 2014.
  6. ^ van Wyk, Janine (2 August 2012). "Janine Van Wyk "I am so proud to be a part of London 2012 Olympics" – Exclusive player blog for Women's Soccer United". Goal.com. Retrieved 17 November 2016.
  7. ^ "Banyana down Namibia in Van Wyk's 100th". SouthAfrica.info. 11 August 2014.
  8. ^ van Wyk, Janine (1 September 2014). "Reaching milestones as South Africa (Banyana Banyana) continue on the road to the 2014 African Women's Championship". Goal.com. Retrieved 17 November 2016.
  9. ^ "Banyana Banyana captain breaks SA record". South African Football Association. 8 April 2016. Archived from the original on 10 April 2016. Retrieved 9 April 2016.

External links[edit]