John Bangsund

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John Bangsund (21 April 1939 – 22 August 2020)[1] was a prominent Australian science fiction fan in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. He was a major force, with Andrew I. Porter, behind Australia winning the right to host the 1975 Aussiecon, and he was Toastmaster at the Hugo Award ceremony at that convention.

Work[edit]

Bangsund was an influential and founding member of ANZAPA – the Australian and New Zealand Amateur Press Association; and long-time editor of the newsletter for the Victorian Society of Editors in Australia (of which he was an honorary life member[2]). His fanzine, Australian Science Fiction Review (ASFR), did much to help revive science fiction fandom in Australia during the 1960s.[3]

He was co-chair of the 9th Australian S.F. Convention (1970), and Fan Guest of Honor at Ozcon (1974 Australian National SF Convention).[4]

Bangsund was the instigator of the term Muphry's law,[5] which states that "if you write anything criticizing editing or proofreading, there will be a fault of some kind in what you have written".[6]

Personal life[edit]

Bangsund was married to Sally Yeoland, who announced on his Facebook page that on 22 August 2020 he had died from COVID-19 during the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia.[7][8]

Awards[edit]

Book references[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

Edited[edit]

  • John W. Campbell: An Australian tribute (1972)[16]

Major fanzines[edit]

  • Australian SF Review[17] (1966–69) - twice nominated for a Hugo Award
  • Scythrop (1969–1972)
  • Philosophical Gas
  • Parergon Papers

Essays[edit]

  • John Bangsund, "1968 and All That" [1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Summary Bibliography: John Bangsund". www.isfdb.org. The Internet Speculative Fiction Database. Retrieved 4 February 2021.
  2. ^ Society of Editors Newsletter March 2007
  3. ^ Warner, Julian (April 2001). "2001 Chandler Award appreciation". The Australian Science Fiction Foundation. Retrieved 4 February 2021.
  4. ^ "Natcon list". Archived from the original on 1 October 2009.
  5. ^ "Muphry's law". The Society of Editors Newsletter. March 1992. Archived from the original on 20 July 2008. Retrieved 13 September 2008.
  6. ^ McIntyre, John E. (2 May 2016). "In a word: Muphry's Law". Baltimore Sun. Tribune Publishing. Retrieved 4 February 2021.
  7. ^ "Post on Bangsund's Facebook page by Sally Yeoland". www.facebook.com. 22 August 2020. Retrieved 4 February 2021.
  8. ^ Koob, Simone Fox (1 November 2020). "Those who lived, loved and are gone: John Bangsund". The Age. ISSN 0312-6307. Retrieved 4 February 2021.
  9. ^ "1967 Hugo Awards". 26 July 2007. Retrieved 4 February 2021.
  10. ^ "1968 Hugo Awards". 26 July 2007. Retrieved 4 February 2021.
  11. ^ "1969 Ditmars". Archived from the original on 10 April 2009. Retrieved 15 September 2008.
  12. ^ "1972 Ditmars". Archived from the original on 10 April 2009. Retrieved 15 September 2008.
  13. ^ "1975 Hugo Awards". 26 July 2007. Retrieved 4 February 2021.
  14. ^ a b "1979 Ditmars". Archived from the original on 10 April 2009. Retrieved 15 September 2008.
  15. ^ "A. Bertram Chandler Award". The Australian Science Fiction Foundation. Retrieved 4 February 2021.
  16. ^ Bangsund, John; Graham, Ronald E., eds. (4 February 1972). "John W. Campbell: an Australian tribute". Ronald E. Graham & John Bangsund. Retrieved 4 February 2021 – via National Library of Australia (new catalog).
  17. ^ "Index of /fanzines/Australian_SFR". fanac.org. F.A.N.A.C. Inc. Retrieved 4 February 2021.