John Purdin

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John Purdin
Pitcher
Born: (1942-07-16)July 16, 1942
Lynx, Ohio
Died: March 28, 2010(2010-03-28) (aged 67)
Charleston, South Carolina
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 16, 1964, for the Los Angeles Dodgers
Last MLB appearance
August 1, 1969, for the Los Angeles Dodgers
MLB statistics
Win–loss record 6–4
earned run average 3.90
Strikeouts 68
Teams
Career highlights and awards

John Nolan Purdin (July 16, 1942 – March 28, 2010) was a Major League Baseball pitcher.[1]

Purdin was born in Lynx, Ohio. He was signed as an amateur free agent by the Los Angeles Dodgers before the start of the 1964 season.[1] He made his debut on September 16, 1964, throwing two innings of no-hit ball in relief against the Pittsburgh Pirates. He struck out Vern Law and Donn Clendenon. Two weeks later on September 30, he threw a two-hit shutout against the Chicago Cubs, giving up his only hits, both singles, to Dick Bertell in the 3rd and 5th inning.[1][2]

In the minors, Purdin threw a perfect game against Lexington in 1964. The game went seven innings, on the backend of a doubleheader. During warmups, he pegged his usual starting catcher, Butch Johnson, in the eye. Jim Connor came in from third base to replace him for the night, and Ed Knipple moved to third. Purdin struck out 11 batters in the perfect outing, with Knipple driving in the only run of the game.[3]

At Salisbury, Purdin posted a 14–3 record with a 1.91 ERA and 182 strikeouts in 137 innings pitched, while only giving up 27 walks.[1][3] For the Spokane Indians in 1967 he led the Pacific Coast League in games started (31) and shutouts (6).[4]

Purdin died in Charleston, South Carolina, at the age of 67.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Career Statistics and History at Baseball-Reference.com
  2. ^ "Purdin of Dodgers Shuts Out Cubs, 2–0". The New York Times. October 1, 1964. p. 41. 
  3. ^ a b Mike London (6 August 2007). "purdin". Salisbury Post. Retrieved 23 December 2008. 
  4. ^ 1969 Topps Baseball Card #161
  5. ^ Major League Baseball Players Who Died in 2010 at Baseball Almanac

External links[edit]