Joint Support Group

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Joint Support Group
Active2007-
Country United Kingdom
Branch British Army
RoleHUMINT
Agent handling
Part ofIntelligence Corps
EngagementsOperation Banner (The Troubles)
War on Terror
Iraq War
War in Afghanistan

The Joint Support Group (JSG) is a covert military intelligence unit of the British Army Intelligence Corps. It was established in 2007 as Operation Banner concluded and following the Stevens Inquiry into allegations of collusion between the former Force Research Unit and Protestant paramilitary groups.[1][2]

Role[edit]

The Joint Support Group is tasked with obtaining intelligence by secretly penetrating terrorist organisations through the recruitment and running agents and informants. The JSG works closely with the Secret Intelligence Service, the Security Service, and United Kingdom Special Forces.[3]

Deployment in Iraq[edit]

The Joint Support Group was active during the Iraq War in running Iraqi double agents and worked closely with the Special Air Service and Delta Force as part of Joint Special Operations Command Task Force Black by providing intelligence for counterterrorism operations. The killing of Abu Musab al-Zarqawi in June 2006 and the rescue of Norman Kember were both enabled by intelligence obtained by JSG.[4] JSG intelligence also supported Operation Marlborough.[5][6]

Deployment in Afghanistan[edit]

JSG was deployed to the War in Afghanistan and reportedly provided intelligence for the capture of 65 Taliban commanders during the Helmand province campaign.[7]

Structure[edit]

JSG consists of a headquarters element, a training wing, and 4 squadrons. Each squadron contains around 100 operatives.[8]

Selection and training[edit]

The Joint Support Group recruits men and women of any rank from the British Army, the Royal Air Force, and the Naval Service up to the age of 42. Volunteers must pass a two-week pre-selection course followed by four months at the Joint Intelligence Training Group at RAF Chicksands.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rayment, Sean (4 February 2007). "Top secret army cell breaks terrorists". The Telegraph. Retrieved 1 July 2017.
  2. ^ Sharp, Aaron (9 March 2014). "Secret army unit credited with saving THOUSANDS of civilian lives facing chop". Mirror. Retrieved 1 July 2017.
  3. ^ "Volume 1 Chapter 3: Intelligence structures Report of the Patrick Finucane Review". Pat Finucane Review. Archived from the original on 16 December 2012.
  4. ^ Rayment, Sean (4 February 2007). "Top secret army cell breaks terrorists". Telegraph. Retrieved 12 August 2017.
  5. ^ Urban, Mark, Task Force Black: The Explosive True Story of the Secret Special Forces War in Iraq, St. Martin's Griffin, 2012 ISBN 1250006961 ISBN 978-1250006967,p.87,
  6. ^ Moran, Jon, From Northern Ireland to Afghanistan: British Military Intelligence Operations, Ethics and Human Rights, Routledge, 2016 ISBN 1250006961 ISBN 1317132017,p.70,
  7. ^ Sharp, Aaron (9 March 2014). "Secret army unit credited with saving THOUSANDS of civilian lives facing chop". Mirror. Retrieved 1 July 2017.
  8. ^ Sharp, Aaron (9 March 2014). "Secret army unit credited with saving THOUSANDS of civilian lives facing chop". Mirror. Retrieved 1 July 2017.
  9. ^ Rayment, Sean (4 February 2007). "Top secret army cell breaks terrorists". Telegraph. Retrieved 12 August 2017.