Karabair

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Karabair
Stamp of Azerbaijan 172.jpg
Karabair on an Azerbaijani stamp
Conservation statusFAO (2007): not at risk[1]:136
Other names
Country of origin
Distribution
Traits
Height
  • Male: 156 cm[5]:291
  • Female: 151 cm[5]:291

The Karabair, Russian: Karabairskaya, is a long-established horse breed from Central Asia, and particularly from Uzbekistan and northern Tajikistan.[5]:290 It results from the cross-breeding of desert horses of Arabian or Turkmene type from the south with steppe horses from the north. It is a small, agile and versatile horse that can be used for riding or driving.[6]:84 It is well suited to local horse sports, and especially to the Uzbek national game, kokpar.[5]:291 It is also used for meat and milk production; the milk may be made into kumis.[3]

In 2003 a total population of 138,400 Karabair horses was reported by Uzbekistan.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Barbara Rischkowsky, D. Pilling (eds.) (2007). List of breeds documented in the Global Databank for Animal Genetic Resources, annex to The State of the World's Animal Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture. Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. ISBN 9789251057629. Accessed October 2014.
  2. ^ Breed data sheet: Karabair/Kazakhstan. Domestic Animal Diversity Information System of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Accessed October 2014.
  3. ^ a b Breed data sheet: Karabairskaya/Tajikistan. Domestic Animal Diversity Information System of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Accessed October 2014.
  4. ^ a b Breed data sheet: Karabairskaya/Uzbekistan. Domestic Animal Diversity Information System of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Accessed October 2014.
  5. ^ a b c d N.G. Dmitriev, L.K. Ernst (1989). Animal genetic resources of the USSR. FAO animal production and health paper 65. Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. ISBN 9251025827. Archived 13 November 2009. Also available here, archived 29 September 2017.
  6. ^ Elwyn Hartley Edwards (1994). The Encyclopedia of the Horse. London; New York; Stuttgart; Moscow: Dorling Kindersley. ISBN 0751301159.