Kate Charlesworth

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Kate Charlesworth
Born1950
OccupationCartoonist, artist
Years active1973–present
Notable work
Sally Heathcote: Suffragette Sensible Footwear: A Girl's Guide
Websitehttp://katecharlesworth.com/

Kate Charlesworth (born 1950) is a British cartoonist and artist who has produced comics and illustrations since the 1970s. Her work has appeared in LGBT publications such as The Pink Paper, Gay News, Strip AIDS, Dyke's Delight, and AARGH, as well as The Guardian, The Independent, and New Internationalist. Lesbian and Gay Studies: A Critical Introduction (Bloomsbury Publishing) calls her a "notable by-and-for lesbian" cartoonist.[1]

In 2015, her graphic novel Sally Heathcote: Suffragette (with Mary and Bryan Talbot) was included in a list published by The Guardian of the "top 10 books about revolutionaries".[2] Sensible Footwear: A Girl’s Guide, her autobiography and history of gay and lesbian culture in England and Scotland from the end of World War II to the present, was published in 2018.[3]

Early life[edit]

Charlesworth was born in Barnsley, Yorkshire, England in 1950 to Joan and Harold Charlesworth.[4][5] Her parents ran a local corner shop during her childhood. She attended Wombwell High School in Barnsley and attended Manchester College of Art and Design for graphics and stage design from 1968 to 1973.

Charlesworth is an only child.[4]

Career[edit]

Charlesworth’s career in comics began in 1973, when she pitched a daily strip called "Twice Nightly" with two gay characters and suffragette themes to Manchester Evening News.[6][7] The strip ran for six months. In 1976 she moved to London, after which she was published in gay and lesbian newspapers including The Pink Paper, Gay News, and Sappho, LGBT comic books including Strip AIDS, Dyke's Delight, and AARGH, and mainstream publications like The Guardian and City Limits (magazine).[6][8] Her strips and cartoons often addressed contemporary issues in the lesbian and LGBT community, including presentation, socio-political issues including oppressive legislation, and stereotypes in a humorous manner. In 1995 her work appeared in Dyke’s Delight issues 1 and 2, introducing some of her most popular characters, including Auntie Studs, to an American audience.[9]

She has produced science comics for New Scientist ("Life, the Universe and (Almost) Everything") and The Independent, as well as illustrations for several books published by the National Museums of Scotland.[10]

She describes her art style as not overly cartoonish or caricature, but emotionally realistic. In an interview she stated that she uses photographic reference and tries to get in the mind of each character to accurately portray their emotions on the page.[11]

More recently, Charlesworth has shifted to working on graphic novels. She illustrated Sally Heathcote: Suffragette by Mary Talbot, published in 2014. Her illustrations were highly praised by Neel Mukherjee in The Guardian as "beautifully executed in black-and-white, with perfectly judged touches of colour."[12] In 2011 she contributed to Blank Slate’s Nelson, a collaborative graphic novel with 54 British comic artists.[13] Nelson was chosen as The Guardian's graphic novel of the month by Rachel Cooke and one of 2011's best graphic novels by The Times.[14][15] Charlesworth spent four years working on her autobiographical work Sensible Footwear: A Girl's Guide, which was published in 2019.[11]

Charlesworth has also worked as a storyboard artist for shows including Bob the Builder (Hot Animation), Pingu (Hot Animation), and Timmy Time (Aardman Animations).[16][17] She has created several cards for Cath Tate Cards, run by fellow cartoonist and friend Cath Tate.[18][19][20][21] She created the CD cover for Fast Talk by Kay Grant and Alex Ward.[22] She also produces various forms of 3-D art, including birthday cards, maps, board games, and shadow boxes, featured on her website.[23]

Her future plans include a joint comic project with her partner, Dianne, as well as moving into different mediums, including animation.[11]

Personal life[edit]

Charlesworth is a lesbian and has stated that she embraced her identity as a dyke in college when she entered a relationship. She has opined that she feels the lesbian community of the time heavily self-policed behavior and look, which prevented her from fully realizing her identity and influenced much of her work.[24][25]

Charlesworth has been politically active in British and Scottish politics and pushes for equal rights. When Clause 28 of the Local Government Act was being pushed in 1988, aiming to ban the promotion of and education about homosexuality by local authorities, including schools, Charlesworth teamed up with Viv Quillin, Cath Jackson, and Cath Tate, three other local cartoonists, to produce a series of postcards to campaign against it.[26] More recently, she has notably been outspoken against Brexit and President Trump, arguing that their popularity represent a backslide for LGBT rights.[27]

She has also been involved in many efforts to increase awareness of LGBT history.[24] In 2006 she illustrated a guide for a walking tour of 500 years of Edinburgh’s LGBT history, published by the LGBT Centre for Health and Wellbeing and Remember When.[28] In the same year she participated in the City of Edinburgh Council's "Rainbow City" exhibition at the City Art Centre.[29][30] She also participates in Edinburgh's Loud and Proud choir, which sang at Equal Marriage lobbies of the Scottish Parliament.[29]

She currently lives with Dianne, her partner of 13 years, a dog, and a cat in the Borders in Scotland.[25]

Awards/Honors[edit]

  • Her work was included along that of Howard Cruse, Groc, Kath Jackson, and David Shenton in the 1990s in an exhibition at the Basement Gallery in London in association with Krazy Kat Theatre Company.[31]
  • Charlesworth and David Shenton had an exhibition of 50 queer-themed cartoons called "Sh(OUT): Contemporary art and Human Rights," developed with OurStory Scotland, at the Glasgow Gallery of Modern Art in 2009.[32][33][34]
  • In 2015 Sally Heathcote: Suffragette was included in a list published by The Guardian of the "top 10 books about revolutionaries".[35]
  • Charlesworth was included among 100 British women cartoonists in "The Inking Woman" exhibition at the Cartoon Museum in 2017.[36]
  • In 2019 an exhibition of Charlesworth's art from Sensible Footwear: A Girl's Guide was held by the United Kingdom European Commission at Europe House.[37][38]
  • Her work was acquired by Glasgow Museum for their fine arts collection in 2019.[39]
  • Charlesworth held a pop-up display at the Cartoon Museum to coincide with the release of her new book in 2019.[40]
  • Sensible Footwear: A Girl's Guide appeared on the 2019 Portico Prize Longlist.[41]

Bibliography[edit]

Books[edit]

  • Sensible Footwear: A Girl’s Guide (Myriad Editions, 2019), ISBN 9780993563348
    • Autobiography detailing Charlesworth's realization of her sexuality, her complicated relationship with her parents, and her political fight against oppression like the legislative section 28. Also a social history of British LGBT identity, experiences, and prejudices from the post-war period to the present day.
  • Sally Heathcote: Suffragette (with Mary M. Talbot and Bryan Talbot; Dark Horse Comics, 2014), ISBN 9781616555474
    • Follows a fictional suffragette, Sally Heathcote, through the British fight for women's suffrage as she encounters famous figures like Emmeline Pankhurst and becomes more involved in the movement, including being arrested and force-fed.
  • Mary Anning: A Souvenir (Lyme Regis, 1999)[42]
  • The Cartoon History of Time (with John Gribbin; Cardinal, 1990), ISBN 9780486490977
  • All That...: The Other Half of History (with Marsaili Cameron; Pandora, 1986), ISBN 9780863580673
    • Mostly visual satirical history textbook placing women at its center.
  • Exotic Species: A Field Guide to Some of Our British Gays (GMP, 1984), ISBN 9780907040385

Contributions[edit]

Graphic novel collaborations[edit]

Comic strips and cartoons[edit]

Books (illustrations)[53][edit]

  • Bolton, David et al. (1989), Oxford Intensive English Courses: OK 1: Student's Book, Oxford University Press, ISBN 9780194323536
  • Bongo, Ali (1979), Be a Magician, Macdonald Educational, ISBN 9780356063683
  • Brown, Gabrielle, editor (2019), Psychoanalytic Thinking on the Unhoused Mind, Routledge, ISBN 9780429620782
  • Dickson, Anne (1982), A Woman In Your Own Right: Assertiveness and You, Quartet Books Limited, ISBN 9780704372696
  • Dickson, Anne (1985), The Mirror Within: A New Look at Sexuality, Quartet, ISBN 9780704334748
  • Henriques, Nikki and Anne Dickson (1986), Women on Hysterectomy: How Long Before I Can Hang-glide?, Thorsons, ISBN 9780722511640
  • Hopson, Barry and Mike Scally (1988), Communication: Time to Talk, Lifeskills Publishing Group, ISBN 9781852521059
  • Irvine, Susan (1994), Bird Facts, HMSO: National Museums of Scotland, ISBN 9780114952167
  • Johnston, Sue (1989), Hold On to the Messy Times, Pandora, ISBN 9780044404972
  • Kitchener, Andrew (1993), Escape from Extinction, HMSO: National Museums of Scotland, ISBN 9780114951221
  • National and Local Government Officers Association (1988), Part-time Work, NALGO
  • National and Local Government Officers Association (1986), Job Sharing, NALGO
  • Robinson, Richard (2006), Why the One You Fancy Never Fancies You: Murphy's Laws of Love, Constable & Robinson, ISBN 9781845294458
  • Summerskill, Clare (2008), We’re The Girls and Other Songs, Stories, and Monologues, Diana Pub., ISBN 9780955830808
  • Swinney, Geoff (1993), Fish Facts, HMSO: National Museums of Scotland, ISBN 9780114951214
  • Wade, Mike and Sue Mitchell (1999), On the Trail of Scotland's Past, NMS Pub., ISBN 9781901663051

References[edit]

  1. ^ Doty, Alexander; Gove, Ben (1997). Lesbian and Gay Studies: A Critical Introduction. Bloomsbury Publishing Plc. p. 95. ISBN 9780304338825.
  2. ^ Mukherjee, Neel (2015-01-14). "Neel Mukherjee's top 10 books about revolutionaries". The Guardian. Retrieved 2017-03-16.
  3. ^ Charlesworth, Kate, author, artist. Sensible footwear : a girl's guide. ISBN 978-0-9935633-4-8. OCLC 1103990878.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  4. ^ a b Jamieson, Teddy (July 27, 2019). "Cartoonist Kate Charlesworth on gay and lesbian life since the 1950s". The Herald. Retrieved November 25, 2019.
  5. ^ "Kate Charlesworth - British Cartoon Archive - University of Kent". www.cartoons.ac.uk. Retrieved 2019-11-26.
  6. ^ a b "Kate Charlesworth - British Cartoon Archive - University of Kent". www.cartoons.ac.uk. Retrieved 2019-11-26.
  7. ^ "Comic Material". Diva magazine. November 1, 2014. ISSN 1353-4912 – via EBSCOhost.
  8. ^ Charlesworth, Kate; Shenton, David (2009). Drawn Out and Painted Pink. Cath Tate Cards.
  9. ^ "GCD :: Issue :: Dyke's Delight #2". www.comics.org. Retrieved 2019-11-26.
  10. ^ Ó Méalóid, Pádraig (2014-07-13). "Suffragette Lady: An Interview with Kate Charlesworth". Retrieved 2017-03-16.
  11. ^ a b c Lyell, Carrie (August 2019). "Rainbow Footprint". Diva magazine – via EBSCOhost.
  12. ^ Mukherjee, Neel (2015-01-14). "Neel Mukherjee's top 10 books about revolutionaries". The Guardian. Retrieved 2017-03-16.
  13. ^ "NELSON « Blank Slate Books". Retrieved 2019-11-26.
  14. ^ Cooke, Rachel (2011-11-18). "Nelson, edited by Rob Davis and Woodrow Phoenix – review". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2019-11-26.
  15. ^ "2011's best graphic novels". The Times. 2011-11-26. ISSN 0140-0460. Retrieved 2019-11-26.
  16. ^ "Kate Charlesworth - Cartoonist - Illustrator - Writer". katecharlesworth.com. Retrieved 2019-11-26.
  17. ^ "Kate Charlesworth". IMDb. Retrieved 2019-11-26.
  18. ^ "Kate Charlesworth - Cartoonist - Illustrator - Writer". katecharlesworth.com. Retrieved 2019-11-26.
  19. ^ "Kate Charlesworth - Cartoonist - Illustrator - Writer". katecharlesworth.com. Retrieved 2019-11-26.
  20. ^ "Kate Charlesworth - Cartoonist - Illustrator - Writer". katecharlesworth.com. Retrieved 2019-11-26.
  21. ^ Streeten, Nicola; Tate, Cath (2018). The Inking Woman. Myriad Editions. ISBN 978-0-9955900-8-3.
  22. ^ "Kate Charlesworth - Cartoonist - Illustrator - Writer". katecharlesworth.com. Retrieved 2019-11-26.
  23. ^ "Kate Charlesworth - 3D". katecharlesworth.com. Retrieved 2019-11-26.
  24. ^ a b Lyell, Carrie (August 2019). "Rainbow Footprint". Diva magazine – via EBSCOhost.
  25. ^ a b Jamieson, Teddy (July 27, 2019). "Cartoonist Kate Charlesworth on gay and lesbian life since the 1950s". The Herald. Retrieved November 25, 2019.
  26. ^ Streeten, Nicola; Tate, Cath (2018). The Inking Woman. Myriad Editions. ISBN 978-0-9955900-8-3.
  27. ^ "My plan? To stick around". Diva magazine. January 2015. ISSN 1353-4912 – via EBSCOhost.
  28. ^ "Happy Walking". ScotsGay Magazine (68). February 2006 – via EBSCOhost.
  29. ^ a b "Comic Material". Diva magazine. November 1, 2014. ISSN 1353-4912 – via EBSCOhost.
  30. ^ "Proud City: People's Story Museum reflects on LGBTQIA+ life in Edinburgh". www.edinburgh.gov.uk. Retrieved 2019-11-26.
  31. ^ Basement Gallery (London, England); Krazy Kat Theatre Co (1990). Crusing!: an exhibition of gay comix featuring the work of Howard Cruse, Kate Charlesworth, Groc, Kath Jackson and David Shenton. London: Basement Gallery. OCLC 27407506.
  32. ^ Charlesworth, Kate; Shenton, David (2009). Drawn Out and Painted Pink. Cath Tate Cards.
  33. ^ "Sh(OUT): Contemporary Art and Human Rights/Drawn Out & Painted Pink". The List. 2009-04-29. Retrieved 2019-11-26.
  34. ^ "Drawn Out and Painted Pink". Gallery Of Modern Art (GoMA) Glasgow. 2018-04-14. Retrieved 2019-11-26.
  35. ^ Mukherjee, Neel (2015-01-14). "Neel Mukherjee's top 10 books about revolutionaries". The Guardian. Retrieved 2017-03-16.
  36. ^ Streeten, Nicola; Tate, Cath (2018). The Inking Woman. Myriad Editions. ISBN 978-0-9955900-8-3.
  37. ^ BAULCH, Kevin (2019-05-31). "Exhibition: Stonewall 50 - LGBTQI+ Life Before & After". United Kingdom - European Commission. Retrieved 2019-11-26.
  38. ^ "Kate Charlesworth". Myriad. Retrieved 2019-11-26.
  39. ^ Stewart, Catriona (July 26, 2019). "Non-binary artist move by city museums". Evening Times (Glasgow, Scotland). Retrieved November 25, 2019 – via NewsBank.
  40. ^ "Kate Charlesworth Book Launch at The Cartoon Museum". Myriad. Retrieved 2019-11-26.
  41. ^ "Portico Prize". The Portico Library. Retrieved 2019-11-26.
  42. ^ Charlesworth, Kate (1999). Mary Anning: a souvenir. Lyme Regis: Lyme Regis Philpot Museum. OCLC 71047114.
  43. ^ "NELSON « Blank Slate Books". Retrieved 2019-11-26.
  44. ^ a b c d e f "Kate Charlesworth - British Cartoon Archive - University of Kent". www.cartoons.ac.uk. Retrieved 2019-11-26.
  45. ^ a b c d Charlesworth, Kate; Shenton, David (2009). Drawn Out and Painted Pink. Cath Tate Cards.
  46. ^ a b "Kate Charlesworth". www.comics.org. Retrieved 2019-11-26.
  47. ^ a b c d "Fanny". Women In Comics Wiki. Retrieved 2019-11-26.
  48. ^ "Women sit at a table with their legs entwined; an advertisement for safe sex by the Lesbian and gay switchboard. Colour lithograph, 1992". Wellcome Library. Retrieved 2019-11-26.
  49. ^ "GCD :: Issue :: Dyke's Delight #2". www.comics.org. Retrieved 2019-11-26.
  50. ^ "The Worm (1999) OGN SC - Comic Book DB". comicbookdb.com. Retrieved 2019-11-26.
  51. ^ "Kate Charlesworth's festival faces index | | guardian.co.uk Arts". www.theguardian.com. Retrieved 2019-11-26.
  52. ^ "Comic Material". Diva magazine. November 1, 2014. ISSN 1353-4912 – via EBSCOhost.
  53. ^ "Explore the British Library Search - kate charlesworth". explore.bl.uk. Retrieved 2019-11-26.

External links[edit]