Kirner Ministry

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Kirner Ministry
63rd cabinet of Victoria, Australia
Date formed 10 August 1990
Date dissolved 6 October 1992
People and organisations
Head of state Queen Elizabeth II
(represented by Davis McCaughey,
The Governor of Victoria)
Head of government Joan Kirner
Deputy head of government Jim Kennan
Member party Labor Party
Opposition party LiberalNational Coalition
Opposition leader Alan Brown, Jeff Kennett
History
Election(s) 1992 state election
Predecessor Cain II Ministry
Successor Kennett Ministry

The Kirner Ministry was the 63rd ministry of the Government of Victoria. It was led by the Premier of Victoria, Joan Kirner, of the Labor Party. The ministry was sworn in on 10 August 1990.[1][2]

Ministry[edit]

Portfolios Minister

Premier
Minister for Ethnic Affairs (until 18 January 1991)

Joan Kirner, MP

Deputy Premier
Attorney-General
Minister for the Arts
Minister for Major Projects (from 18 January 1991)

Jim Kennan, MP

Minister for Property and Services (until 18 January 1991)
Minister for Agriculture (18 January 1991 to 21 January 1992)
Minister for Food and Agriculture (from 21 January 1992)

Ian Baker, MP

Minister for Tourism
Minister for Conservation and Environment (until 21 January 1992)
Minister for Water Resources (from 21 January 1992)

Steve Crabb, MP

Minister for Health (until 18 January 1991)
Minister for Ethnic, Municipal and Community Affairs (from 18 January 1991)

Caroline Hogg, MLC

Minister for Local Government (until 18 January 1991)
Minister for Health (from 18 January 1991)

Maureen Lyster, MLC

Minister for Planning and Urban Growth (until 18 January 1991)
Minister for Planning and Housing (from 18 January 1991)

Andrew McCutcheon, MP

Minister for Consumer Affairs
Minister for Prices (until 18 January 1991)
Minister for Aboriginal Affairs (until 15 August 1991)

Brian Mier, MLC

Minister for Labour
Minister for Education (from 21 January 1992)

Neil Pope, MP

Minister for Education (until 18 January 1991)
Minister for Education and Training 18 January 1991 to 21 January 1992)
Minister for Conservation and Environment (from 21 January 1992)

Barry Pullen, MLC

Treasurer (until 21 January 1992)
Minister of Aboriginal Affairs (from 15 August 1991)
Minister for Post-Secondary Education and Training (from 21 January 1992)
Minister for Gaming (from 21 January 1992)

Tom Roper, MP

Minister for Agriculture and Rural Affairs (until 18 January 1991)
Minister for Small Business (18 January 1991 to 16 April 1991)

Barry Rowe, MP

Minister for Police and Emergency Services
Minister for Corrections

Mal Sandon, MP

Minister for Community Services

Kay Setches, MP

Minister for Housing and Construction (until 18 January 1991)
Minister for Finance (18 January 1991 to 21 January 1992)
Treasurer (from 21 January 1992)

Tony Sheehan, MP

Minister for Transport

Peter Spyker, MP

Minister for Sport and Recreation

Neil Tresize, MP

Minister for Industry and Economic Planning (until 18 December 1990)
Minister for Major Projects (until 18 January 1991)
Minister for Manufacturing and Industry (from 18 January 1991)
Minister for Gaming (9 April 1991 to 21 January 1992)

The Hon David White, MLC

Minister for Small Business (16 April 1991 to 21 January 1992)
Minister for Finance (from 21 January 1992)
Minister Assisting the Minister for Labour on WorkCare (from 21 January 1992)

John Harrowfield, MP

Minister for Consumer Affairs (from 15 August 1991)
Minister Assisting the Minister for Manufacturing and Industry Development
on Major Public Authorities (15 August 1991 to 21 January 1992)
Minister for Small Business (from 21 January 1992)
Minister Assisting the Minister for Manufacturing and Industry Development
on Corporatisation (from 21 January 1992)

Theo Theophanous, MLC

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ministers of the Crown". Victorian Government Gazette: p. 1990:2512–2513 15 August 1990.
  2. ^ Hughes, Colin A. (2002). A Handbook of Australian Government and Politics, 1985-1999. Federation Press. p. 85.
Parliament of Victoria
Preceded by
Cain Ministry (1982–1990)
Kirner Ministry
1990–1992
Succeeded by
Kennett Ministry