Kundavai Pirāttiyār

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Ālvār Sri Parāntakan Sri Kundavai Pirāttiyār or Kundavai Pirāttiyār was one of the queens of the Chola empire.[1] She was the daughter of Parantaka Chola II and the elder sister of Rajaraja Chola I.[2][3][4]

Life and works[edit]

Kuntavai commissioned many temples temples for Siva, Vishnu and Jaina.[5][6] She features in Chola inscriptions.[7][8]

She built at least two Jain temples, one at Rajarajeswaram later known as Dadapuram and the other at Tirumalai.[8] She built a hospital after her father named Sundara Chola Vinnagar atula salai at Thanjavur and donated extensive lands for its maintenance.[10][11] She made lavish donations to the Brihadeeswarar temple at Thanjavur during the reign of her younger brother Rajaraja Chola I and her nephew Rajendra Chola I.

One of the inscriptions reads:

[13] Some of the images or idols set up by princess Kundavai include:[14]

Here is an excerpt from the 29th year of Rajaraja that lists some of her gifts to Brihadeeswarar temple:

Kundavai spent the last days of her life with her nephew Rajendra Chola I at the palace in Palaiyārai.[11][16][17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lalit kalā, Issue 15, page 34
  2. ^ Early Chola art, page 183
  3. ^ A Topographical List of Inscriptions in the Tamil Nadu and Kerala States: Thanjavur District, page 180
  4. ^ Worshiping Śiva in medieval India: ritual in an oscillating universe, page 5
  5. ^ Women in Indian life and society, page 49
  6. ^ South Indian Inscriptions – Vol II-Part 1 (Tanjore temple Inscriptions)
  7. ^ Śrīnidhiḥ: perspectives in Indian archaeology, art, and culture, page 364
  8. ^ a b Encyclopaedia of Jainism, page 1000
  9. ^ A topographical list of inscriptions in the Tamil Nadu and Kerala states, Volume 2, page 206
  10. ^ Ancient system of oriental medicine, page 96
  11. ^ a b Great women of India, page 306
  12. ^ A topographical list of inscriptions in the Tamil Nadu and Kerala states, Volume 2, page 207
  13. ^ Portrait sculpture in south India, page 34
  14. ^ Middle Chola temples:Rajaraja I to Kulottunga I (A.D. 985–1070), page 42
  15. ^ a b South Indian inscriptions: Volume 2, Parts 1–2
  16. ^ Encyclopaedia of Status and Empowerment of Women in India: Status and position of women in ancient, medieval and modern India, page 176
  17. ^ Middle Chola temples: Rajaraja I to Kulottunga I (A.D. 985–1070), page 381
  18. ^ Śāṅkaram: recent researches on Indian culture, page 97

Further reading[edit]

  • Great women of India By Madhavananda (Swami.), Ramesh Chandra Majumdar
  • Lalit kalā, Issue 15, Lalit Kalā Akademi., 1972
  • Middle Chola temples: Rajaraja I to Kulottunga I (A.D. 985–1070) By S. R. Balasubrahmanyam, Oriental Press, 1977
  • Śrīnidhiḥ: perspectives in Indian archaeology, art, and culture By K. R. Srinivasan, K. V. Raman
  • Encyclopaedia of Jainism, Volume 1 By Indo-European Jain Research Foundation
  • Portrait sculpture in south India By T. G. Aravamuthan
  • Ancient system of oriental medicine By S.P. Verma
  • Worshiping Śiva in medieval India: ritual in an oscillating universe By Richard H. Davis
  • Women in Indian life and society By Amitābha Mukhopādhyāẏa
  • A Topographical List of Inscriptions in the Tamil Nadu and Kerala States, Volume 7, T. V. Mahalingam, Indian Council of Historical Research, 1985
  • Śāṅkaram: recent researches on Indian culture By S. Sankaranarayanan, S. S. Ramachandra Murthy, B. Rajendra Prasad, D. Kiran Kranth Choudary
  • South Indian inscriptions: Volume 2, Parts 1–2 By Eugen Hultzsch, India. Archaeological Survey, India. Dept. of Archaeology
  • Encyclopaedia of Status and Empowerment of Women in India: Status and position of women in ancient, medieval and modern India By Raj Pruthi, Rameshwari Devi, Romila Pruthi