Kuni (woreda)

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Kuni is one of the woredas in the Oromia Region of Ethiopia. Part of the Mirab Hararghe Zone, Kuni is bordered on the south by Boke, on the west by Habro, on the northeast by Chiro, and on the east by the Galetti River which separates it from the Misraq Hararghe Zone.

Overview[edit]

Khat is an important cash crop of this woreda, but because it is a very perishable commodity and must be cultivated not too far from major markets or good roads, it is grown along the main roads.[1] Coffee is another important cash crop of this woreda. Over 50 km² is planted with this crop.[2]

Kuni was selected in 2006 by the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development as an area for voluntary resettlement for farmers from overpopulated areas. Along with Boke and Darolebu woredas, Kuni became the new home for 3308 families.[3]

Demographics[edit]

The 2007 national census reported a total population for this woreda of 158,282, of whom 81,029 were men and 77,253 were women; none of its population were urban dwellers. The majority of the inhabitants said they were Muslim, with 86.47% of the population reporting they observed this belief, while 13.37% of the population practised Ethiopian Orthodox Christianity.[4]

Based on figures published by the Central Statistical Agency in 2005, this woreda has an estimated total population of 160,813, of whom 78,641 are men and 82,172 are women; 19,361 or 12.04% of its population are urban dwellers, which is greater than the Zone average of 9.6%. With an estimated area of 1,322.50 square kilometers, Kuni has an estimated population density of 121.6 people per square kilometer, which is greater than the Zone average of 101.8.[5]

The 1994 national census reported a total population for this woreda of 113,783, of whom 58,276 were men and 55,507 women; 10,813 or 9.5% of its population were urban dwellers at the time. The two largest ethnic groups reported in Kuni were the Oromo (83.14%), and the Amhara (15.99%); all other ethnic groups made up 0.87% of the population. Oromiffa was spoken as a first language by 81.72%, 17.74% spoke Amharic; the remaining 0.54% spoke all other primary languages reported. The majority of the inhabitants were Moslem, with 81.18% of the population reporting they practiced that belief, while 18.58% of the population said they professed Ethiopian Orthodox Christianity.[6]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Hararghe farmers on the cross-roads between subsistence and cash economy", UNDP Emergencies Unit for Ethiopia report, dated September 1998 (accessed 4 January 2009)
  2. ^ "Coffee Production" Oromia Coffee Cooperative Union website
  3. ^ "More than 15,500 households resettled in Amhara, SNNP and Oromia states" Walta Information Center
  4. ^ 2007 Population and Housing Census of Ethiopia: Results for Oromia Region, Vol. 1, Tables 2.1, 2.5, 3.4 (accessed 13 January 2012)
  5. ^ CSA 2005 National Statistics, Tables B.3 and B.4
  6. ^ 1994 Population and Housing Census of Ethiopia: Results for Oromia Region, Vol. 1, part 1, Tables 2.1, 2.13, 2.16, 2.20 (accessed 6 April 2009)

Coordinates: 8°40′N 40°45′E / 8.667°N 40.750°E / 8.667; 40.750