Lake Poway

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Lake Poway
Lake Poway.jpg
Lake Poway in 2009
Lake Poway is located in California
Lake Poway
Location of Lake Poway in California
LocationPoway, California, US
Coordinates33°00′25″N 117°00′36″W / 33.00694°N 117.01000°W / 33.00694; -117.01000Coordinates: 33°00′25″N 117°00′36″W / 33.00694°N 117.01000°W / 33.00694; -117.01000
StatusIn use
Construction began1970
Opening date1972
Owner(s)City of Poway
Dam and spillways
Type of damEarthen dam
Height165 ft (50 m)
Dam volume1,300,000 m3 (46,000,000 cu ft)
Reservoir
Total capacity3,800 acre⋅ft (4,700,000 m3)
Surface area35 acres (14 ha)
Website
poway.org/401/Lake-Poway

Lake Poway is a dam and reservoir in Poway, California, United States. The dam is owned by the City of Poway and was constructed between 1970 and 1972 with the purpose of storing and supplying water, and providing recreational facilities to the community. A $3.2-million bond issue for construction of the dam was rejected by voters in 1964 and 1966, but passed with 87 percent in favor in 1969.

History[edit]

In 1962, a report showed that Poway's existing storage facilities were insufficient in the event of a breakdown of the aqueduct from the Colorado river following an earthquake or other interruption to the supply. As a result, it was proposed that an earthen dam be built in Warren Canyon to impound water and form a storage reservoir. Funds for the project were to come from a bond issue and the matter came to a vote in March 1964. In this first vote and a second attempt in June 1966, the measure received the support of most voters, but failed to reach the required two-thirds majority. Finally, in June 1969, a $3.2-million bond was passed with 87 percent in favor. Groundbreaking took place in December 1970, with water flowing into the dam in late 1971. Recreational facilities were built in 1972, and opened in October of that year.[1]

In 2017, torrential rains caused the reservoir water level to near the top of the dam, but a spillover did not occur and it remained structurally sound.[2]

In 2019, Poway experienced a water quality event. A precautionary boil water advisory was issued and the San Diego County Department of Health forced restaurants and other businesses to shut down for a week.[3] The problem started when a storm water pipe backed up during strong rains on the 28 and 29 of November. The pipe leaked storm water into the clearwell reservoir near Lake Poway and next to the water treatment plant, clouding the water sent to homes with mud and residue.[4] After the problem was fixed, the 2019 annual water quality report showed that the drinking water was safe.[5][6]

Dam and reservoir[edit]

Lake Poway in June 2020

The dam is an earth-filled dam with a height of 165 ft (50 m). The reservoir has a surface area of 35 acres (14 ha), and a capacity of 3,800 acre⋅ft (4,700,000 m3).[7]

The spillway is a span of concrete 100 ft (30 m) wide, located on the east side of the dam.[8]

Recreational usage[edit]

The adjacent hillside park has several picnic areas, playgrounds and sports facilities.[9]

On May 9, 2017, a memorial statue was unveiled at Lake Poway in honor of long-time Poway resident and San Diego Padres baseball player Tony Gwynn. The bronze likeness of Gwynn was designed by Seth Vandable.[10]

Hiking[edit]

The lake has a 2.75-mile loop trail that circles the reservoir and links to other trails such as the Blue Sky Ecological Reserve trail to Lake Ramona, and the more difficult route to the top of Mount Woodson,[7] and the Potato Chip rock.[11]

The trail passes through four distinct environments: sage scrub, chaparral, oak woodland and riparian woodland.[12] A variety of native plants such as Arroyo Lupine (Lupinus succulentus) and Wild Canterbury bells (Phacelia minor) can be found near the lake.[13]

Fishing[edit]

Year-round fishing is available for trout, bass, catfish, sunfish and bluegill. The lake is stocked with rainbow trout in the winter months, and offers good fishing for bass, catfish, and bluegill in warmer months.[14] The lake has hosted an annual youth fishing derby for more than 25 years.[15]

The following are the lake catch records:[16]

  • Bass: 9 pounds, 5 ounces (2020)
  • Blue Catfish: 47 pounds (2017)
  • Channel Catfish: 28 pounds (1981)
  • Sunfish: 2 pounds, 4 ounces (2006)
  • Bluegill: 2 pounds, 8 ounces (2002)

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Shepardson, Mary (4 November 2017). "Third time was the charm for Lake Poway". San Diego Union Tribune. Archived from the original on 29 June 2020. Retrieved 29 June 2020.
  2. ^ Dreyer, Steve (1 March 2017). "City monitoring Lake Poway reservoir level". San Diego Union Tribune. Archived from the original on 29 June 2020. Retrieved 29 June 2020.
  3. ^ Hoffman, Matt (6 December 2019). "Poway Businesses Hurting In Midst Of Water Crisis". KPBS Public Media. Archived from the original on 2020-06-29. Retrieved 2020-06-29.
  4. ^ Jones, J. Harry (2019-12-07). "State lifts boil-water alert in Poway, deems water safe to drink". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on 2020-07-07. Retrieved 2020-07-07.
  5. ^ Sorensen, Emily (26 June 2020). "Poway report shows drinking water is safe and high-quality". San Diego Union Tribune. Archived from the original on 29 June 2020. Retrieved 29 June 2020.
  6. ^ 2019 Poway Annual Water Quality Report
  7. ^ a b Janczyn, George (27 May 2013). "A visit to Lake Poway reservoir and dam". Groksurf's San Diego. Archived from the original on 29 June 2020. Retrieved 29 June 2020.
  8. ^ Jones, J. Harry (2017-02-28). "Rains nearly fill Lake Poway". baltimoresun.com. Archived from the original on 2020-07-07. Retrieved 2020-07-07.
  9. ^ "Lake Poway". City of Poway. Archived from the original on 29 June 2020. Retrieved 29 June 2020.
  10. ^ "Tony Gwynn Memorial". Archived from the original on 29 June 2020. Retrieved 29 June 2020.
  11. ^ "Mount Woodson (Potato Chip Rock) via Lake Poway". Hiking San Diego County. 2015-01-08. Archived from the original on 2020-06-30. Retrieved 2020-06-30.
  12. ^ Schad, Jerry; Turner, Scott (2017). Afoot and Afield: San Diego County (5th ed.). Birmingham, AL: Wilderness Press. p. 112. ISBN 9780899978017.
  13. ^ Schmidt, Clarence (2018-11-20). "Enjoying our local native plants". San Diego Union Tribune. Archived from the original on 2020-06-30. Retrieved 2020-06-30.
  14. ^ "Lake Poway". SDFish. Archived from the original on 2020-06-30. Retrieved 2020-06-30.
  15. ^ Sorensen, Emily (2021-01-07). "Poway youth fishing derby, campout signups open". Pomerado News. Archived from the original on 2021-01-10. Retrieved 2021-01-10.
  16. ^ "Lake Poway Fish Report & Records". City of Poway. Archived from the original on 29 June 2020. Retrieved 29 June 2020.

External links[edit]