Lancaster station (California)

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Lancaster
Metrolink (Southern California)
Metrolink commuter rail station
Lancaster Metrolink station 2145 06.JPG
Lancaster station, 2012
Location44812 Sierra Highway
Lancaster, CA 93534
Coordinates34°41′48″N 118°08′12″W / 34.69667°N 118.13667°W / 34.69667; -118.13667Coordinates: 34°41′48″N 118°08′12″W / 34.69667°N 118.13667°W / 34.69667; -118.13667
Owned byCity of Lancaster
Line(s)
Platforms1 side platform
Tracks4
ConnectionsAmtrak Thruway Motorcoach
Construction
ParkingApproximately 140 spaces
Bicycle facilitiesLockers
Disabled accessYes
Other information
Station codeLCS
History
OpenedLast Year
RebuiltThis Year
Services
Preceding station   Metrolink icon.svg Metrolink   Following station
TerminusAntelope Valley Line
Location
Location of Lancaster station (California) within Los Angeles
Location of Lancaster station (California) within Los Angeles
Lancaster
Location within Los Angeles

Lancaster Station is owned by and located in the city of Lancaster, California. It serves as a connection transfer point for 9 public transportation bus routes, and 1 Amtrak Bus Thruway route, as well as the final Metrolink train station on the Antelope Valley line that originates 69 miles away in downtown Los Angeles, at Union Station. 18 Metrolink trains, (9 northbound / 9 southbound) serve the station each weekday and 12 Metrolink trains, (6 northbound / 6 southbound) serves on the weekends. Weekday Metrolink service runs primarily at peak hours in the peak direction of travel while weekend departures and arrivals are fairly evenly spaced throughout the day. Originally the Antelope Valley line had terminated in Santa Clarita, and was named the Santa Clarita line. The construction of the Lancaster station, as well as the extension for Metrolink service to Lancaster was to begin in 2004. These plans were expedited by almost 10 years following the 1994 Northridge earthquake, which caused the connector ramps for the 14 & the 5 freeways to collapse, so thanks to the U.S. Navy Seabees construction battalion and crews from the L.A. County Public Works Department working around the clock to construct an emergency Lancaster station, as well as the 38 mile railway service to Lancaster, one week after the Northridge quake it was in full operation. .

Platforms and tracks[edit]

East tracks (3)  Freight lines No passenger service
West track  Antelope Valley Line toward L.A. Union Station (Palmdale)

Bus services[edit]

External links[edit]