Libya Shield Force

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Libya Shield Force
قوة درع ليبيا
Libya Shield Force.png
Active2012
AlliesFajr Libya militia[1]
Battles and war(s)Libyan Crisis

The Libya Shield Force is an armed organisation formed in 2012 out of anti-Gaddafi armed groups spread throughout Libya. The Libyan parliament designated much of the Libya Shield Force as terrorist and elements of the Libya Shield Force were identified as linked to al-Qaeda as early as 2012.[2][3]

Since the outbreak of the Second Libyan Civil War, the Libya Shield Force has been associated with the Islamic fundamentalist side.[citation needed]

Branches[edit]

The major branches of the Libya Shield Force fighting for Islamists in the current conflict are:

Creation[edit]

The Libyan Ministry of Defense, under decision No. 29, formed and named Libya Shield Forces on 8 March 2012. Decision No. 29 states, "A brigade shall be formed in the Central Region of Libya and is to be called Libya Shield – The forces of the Central Brigade shall consist, in general, of rebels from the following regions, Misrata, Sirte, Jafra, Bani Walid, Terhuna, Alkhmuss, Mslath and Zliten. Colonel Mohammed Ibrahim Moussa shall be the commander of the brigade and shall be stationed in Misrata." This decision was signed by the Minister of Defense, Osama Abdulsalam Aljuli. Thus, the name Libya Shield Forces was first coined by the Libyan Minister of Defense.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://english.alarabiya.net/en/perspective/alarabiya-studies/2014/08/25/Libyan-Dawn-Map-of-allies-and-enemies.html
  2. ^ "Libyan Militia Units That Aided U.S. Marines During Embassy Attack Linked To Al-Qaeda". Inquisitr. Retrieved 10 February 2015.
  3. ^ Rosenthal, J. (2013). The Jihadist Plot: The Untold Story of Al-Qaeda and the Libyan Rebellion. Encounter Books. ISBN 9781594036828. Retrieved 10 February 2015.
  4. ^ "Jihadists Now Control Secretive U.S. Base in Libya - The Daily Beast". thedailybeast.com. Retrieved 10 February 2015.
  5. ^ "Tripoli airport 'seized by Islamist militia'". Al Jazeera. 23 August 2014. Retrieved 23 August 2014.
  6. ^ Chris Stephen and Anne Penketh (24 August 2014). "Libyan capital under Islamist control after Tripoli airport seized". The Guardian. Retrieved 24 August 2014.