Lilium columbianum

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Lilium columbianum
Lilium columbianum 9527.JPG
Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Tracheophytes
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Monocots
Order: Liliales
Family: Liliaceae
Subfamily: Lilioideae
Tribe: Lilieae
Genus: Lilium
Species:
L. columbianum
Binomial name
Lilium columbianum
Leichtlin 1871 not Hanson 1874
Synonyms[1]
Synonymy
  • Lilium canadense var. minus Alph.Wood
  • Lilium canadense var. walkeri Alph.Wood
  • Lilium californicum Duch.
  • Lilium sayi Nutt. ex Duch.
  • Lilium canadense var. californicum (Duch.) Bol.
  • Lilium parviflorum (Hook.) W.G.Sm.
  • Lilium lucidum Kellogg
  • Lilium nitidum W.Bull ex Baker
  • Lilium bakeri Purdy
  • Lilium purdyi Waugh

Lilium columbianum is a lily native to western North America.[2][3] It is also known as the Columbia lily, Columbia tiger lily, or simply tiger lily (sharing the latter common name with several other lily species in its genus).

Distribution[edit]

Lilium columbianum occurs in lowland and montane forest openings and meadows from southern British Columbia in Canada south to northern California and east to Montana in the northwestern United States.[2][4] Mostly occurring below 2,000 m (6,600 ft), it usually blooms in June through early August.[2] There are a few isolated populations at high elevations in the Sierra Nevada as far south as Fresno County.[5][6]

Description[edit]

Lilium columbianum grows up to 1.2 metres (3.9 ft) tall, and bears from few to numerous orange flowers with darker spots. The tepals are 3 to 6 cm long and the flowers are lightly scented. Like many true lilies, the leaves are arranged in whorls around the stem of the plant.[7][8][9][5][10]

Uses[edit]

Food[edit]

Coast Salish, Nuu-chah-nulth and most western Washington peoples steamed, boiled or pit-cooked its bulbs. Bitter or peppery-tasting, they were mostly used as a flavoring, often in soup with meat or fish.[11]

Horticulture[edit]

From seed, Lilium columbianum requires three to five years to mature. Cultivated bulbs can be divided or bulb scales may be used to generate new plants more quickly.[12]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kew World Checklist of Selected Plant Families
  2. ^ a b c Sullivan, Steven. K. (2015). "Lilium columbianum". Wildflower Search. Retrieved 2016-04-09.
  3. ^ "Lilium columbianum". PLANTS Database. United States Department of Agriculture; Natural Resources Conservation Service. 2015. Retrieved 2016-04-09.
  4. ^ Biota of North America Program 2014 county distribution map
  5. ^ a b "Lilium columbianum". Jepson eFlora: Taxon page. Jepson Herbarium; University of California, Berkeley. 2015. Retrieved 2016-04-09.
  6. ^ Calflora taxon report, Lilium columbianum Baker Columbia lily, Columbian lily, Oregon lily
  7. ^ Flora of North America Vol. 26 Page 185 Lilium columbianum Leichtlin ex Duchartre
  8. ^ Klinkenberg, Brian (Editor) (2014). "Lilium columbianum". E-Flora BC: Electronic Atlas of the Plants of British Columbia [eflora.bc.ca]. Lab for Advanced Spatial Analysis, Department of Geography, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. Retrieved 2016-04-09.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  9. ^ Giblin, David (Editor) (2015). "Lilium columbianum". WTU Herbarium Image Collection. Burke Museum, University of Washington. Retrieved 2016-04-09.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  10. ^ Hitchcock, C. Leo; Cronquist, Arthur (1973). Flora of the Pacific Northwest; an illustrated manual. Seattle: University of Washington Press. ISBN 0295952733.
  11. ^ Pojar, Jim (2004). Plants of the Pacific Northwest Coast. Edmonton: Lone Pine Publishing. ISBN 9781551055305.
  12. ^ Kruckeberg, Arthur R. (1996). Gardening with Native Plants of the Pacific Northwest: Second Edition. Seattle: University of Washington Press. ISBN 9780295974767.

External links[edit]