Lloyd Brown (baseball)

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Lloyd Brown
Lloyd Brown.jpg
Pitcher
Born: (1904-12-25)December 25, 1904
Beeville, Texas
Died: January 14, 1974(1974-01-14) (aged 69)
Opa-locka, Florida
Batted: left Threw: left
MLB debut
July 17, 1925, for the Brooklyn Robins
Last MLB appearance
August 10, 1940, for the Philadelphia Phillies
MLB statistics
Win–loss record 91–105
Earned run average 4.20
Strikeouts 510
Teams

Lloyd Andrew Brown [Gimpy] (December 25, 1904 – January 14, 1974) was a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for five different teams between the 1925 and 1940 seasons. Listed at 5 ft 9 in (1.75 m), 170 lb., Brown batted and threw left-handed. He was born in Beeville, Texas.[1]

Lloyd Brown spent 30 years in professional baseball, including 12 major league seasons, but he is best remembered as the pitcher who delivered the most home runs to Lou Gehrig, 15, including two grand slams. In between, he played or managed in the minor leagues during the same period and later became a respected scout.[2][3][4]

Brown reached the majors in 1925 with the Brooklyn Robins, spending one year with them before moving to the Washington Senators (1928–32), St. Louis Browns (1933), Boston Red Sox (1933), Cleveland Indians (1934–37) and Philadelphia Phillies (1940). In between, he played or managed in the Minor leagues during twelve seasons and later became a respected scout. His most productive season came in 1930 for the poor-hitting Senators, when he posted career-numbers with 16 wins, 15 complete games and 258 innings pitched. In 1931 he won 15 games for Washington, collecting career-highs in earned run average (3.20) and strikeouts (79), and again recorded 15 victories in 1932.[1]

Brown later pitched in the minors from 1941 through 1953. He also managed for ten teams between 1947 and 1960, spent part of 1955 as a Baltimore Orioles' coach, and scouted for the Orioles (1956–57), Phillies (1957–58, 1970–71), Senators (1961–66) and Seattle Pilots (1969) organizations. Brown won 202 games during 20 minor league seasons, and had a 407–544 record as a manager in 11 seasons (1946-'53, 1955–56, 1960).[3]

Brown died in Opa-locka, Florida at the age of 69.[1]

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