Love, Day After Tomorrow

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"Love, Day After Tomorrow"
Gzca-1014.jpg
Single by Mai Kuraki
from the album Delicious Way
B-side "Everything's All Right"
Released December 8, 1999
Format
Recorded 1999
Genre
Length 4:05
Label
Writer(s) Mai Kuraki, Aika Oona
Producer(s) Kanonji
Mai Kuraki singles chronology
"Baby I Like"
(1999)
"Love, Day After Tomorrow"
(1999)
"Stay by My Side"
(2000)

"Love, Day After Tomorrow" is a song recorded by Japanese singer Mai Kuraki, taken as the lead single of her debut studio album Delicious Way (2000). It was released on December 8, 1999 via Giza Studio and Tent House in two physical editions; a CD single and 12" vinyl. The track was written by Kuraki herself, while production was handled by Kanonji. The conception of the song started after the commercial failure of her English language single "Baby I Like", which led to her American label Bip! Records to send her back to Japan, and she subsequently reverted back to the Japanese market.

Musically, "Love, Day After Tomorrow" is a pop recording that incorporates elements of R&B and teen music, and lyrically discusses about themes of love. Upon its release, the single received positive reviews from music critics, who praised the singles commercial quality and production, but some noted similarities to another rising Japanese artist, Utada Hikaru. Commercially, it experienced success in Japan, reaching number two on the Oricon Singles Chart and was certified million by the Recording Industry Association of Japan (RIAJ) for shipments of one million copies. Despite not charting in North America, it sold over 5,000 copies.

An accompanying music video was directed and released in December 1999, where it featured the singer in a white/black room and shared intercut scenes with various locations in New York City and Japan. In order to promote the single, Kuraki performed it on several nationwide concert tours, and additionally added it to greatest hits albums including All My Best (2009) and Mai Kuraki Best 151A: Love & Hope (2014). Since its release, it has become the singer's best-selling single and has sold over 1.385 million units in Japan, ranking it among many other best-selling entries.

Background and composition[edit]

In 1999, Kuraki sent Japanese label Giza Studio a demo tape of various compositions she had recorded, in order to secure a contract with them.[1] Despite them being impressed by her performance, they signed her with American label Bip! Records, and sent her to New York City in the United States to debut in that region. This attributed to her debut single "Baby I Like", which was recorded in English language, and would coincide with her then-upcoming English studio album.[2] The track impressed executives at East West Records, prompting the label to distribute it.[3] However, because it failed to chart on any Billboard chart there, her label dropped her and sent her back to Japan, where she began recording new material for a Japanese debut.[4]

From the bunch, "Love, Day After Tomorrow" was written solely by Kuraki, while production was handled by Kanonji. Furthermore, it was composed by Aika Ohno and arranged by American music team Cybersound.[5] Because of Kuraki's experience with English, she wrote some lyrics and phrases in that language.[5] Musically, "Love, Day After Tomorrow" is a pop recording that incorporates elements of R&B and teen music, and lyrically discusses about themes of love.[4][6] In an article from Japanese magazine CD Journal, a contributing editor compared the music to Western culture in the 1990s.[6] AllMusic's Alexey Eremenko agreed, comparing the sound to the likes of Whitney Houston and Michael Jackson.[4]

Release and reception[edit]

"Love, Day After Tomorrow" was taken as the lead single from Kuraki's debut record, Delicious Way (2000), and serves as her Japanese debut.[7] It premiered in Japan on December 8, 1999 via Giza Studio in two physical editions; a CD single and 12" vinyl. The compact disc included the original recording, an additional B-side titled "Everything's All Right"—along with a bonus remix—, plus the single's instrumental composition.[5] Furthermore, the vinyl release was issued on March 8, 2000, and included two numbers on each side; the original song, and a Day Tripper Drum N' Bass mix, whilst the reverse side had the same listing for "Everything's All Right".[8] Upon its release, the single received positive reviews from music critics. A member of CD Journal praised the singers vocals and the tracks production, but compared its sound and commercial appeal to the works of another rising Japanese artist at the time, Utada Hikaru.[6] Furthermore, Alexey Eremenko of AllMusic selected it amongst her best singles.[9]

Commercially, "Love, Day After Tomorrow" experienced success in Japan. It entered the weekly Oricon Singles Chart at number two, marking it her first charting experience and eventually starting her trend of non-consecutive number-two positions.[10] By the end of 2000, Oricon ranked the single at number four on their year-end chart, with estimated sales of 1,385,190 units; this stands as Kuraki's best-selling single, and was the second highest entry by a female artist, only behind Utada's "Wait & See (Risk)" which placed at number three.[11] It was certified million by the Recording Industry Association of Japan (RIAJ) for shipments of one million units.[12] The company also listed it as the 101st best-selling single in Japanese history, her only entry to date.[13] According to CD Journal, more than 5,000 copies were pre-ordered and sold in the United States.[6] After the release of the singers compilation All My Best in 2009, the song appeared at number 64 on the Japan Hot 100, published by Billboard.[14] It was certified gold by the RIAJ for digital sales of 100,000 copies.[15]

Promotion[edit]

An accompanying music video was directed and produced for the singers DVD compilation First Cut (2000), as her management had no prior plans to create a visual for the single.[16] It features the singer in a black and white room, singing the song in front of a chair. The clip has intercut scenes with various locations in New York City and Japan, showing the lifestyles of several people in the cities.[17] To celebrate the artist's third greatest hits album, Kuraki uploaded a new version of the video that featured numerous scenes that were taken by 15 different directors.[18] Japanese musician Aika Ohno, who served as the composer to the track, covered the song in English language and appeared on her debut record Shadows of Dreams (2002).[19]

In order to promote the single, Kuraki performed it on several nationwide concert tours. It's first appearance was on her Experience Live Tour, which commenced in early 2001, and was included on her Loving You... Tour the following year.[20][21] Between 2003 and 2004, the singer added it to the set list of her Fairy Tale concert tour, and was used as one of the opening numbers to her 5th Anniversary show.[22][23] It followed as an encore to her Diamond Wave 2006 tour, her 2008 Touch Me concert, her 10th anniversary tour, and her Happy Halloween Concert tour at. Saitama Super Arena.[24][25][26][27] On January 14, 2017, the singer, alongside vocalists Shizuka, Ami and Reina Washio from Japanese band E-girls, performed a new rendition of the track on Music Fair.[28]

Track listing[edit]

All lyrics written by Mai Kuraki.

CD single[5]
No. Title Music Arranger(s) Length
1. "Love, Day After Tomorrow" Aika Ohno Cybersound 4:05
2. "Everything's All Right" Masataka Kitaura Cybersound 4:09
3. "Everything's All Right" (Remix) Kitaura Cybersound, Remixed by Perry Geyer 5:10
4. "Love, Day After Tomorrow" (Instrumental) Ohno Cybersound 4:05
12" vinyl[8]
No. Title Music Arranger(s) Length
1. "Love, Day After Tomorrow" Aika Ohno Cybersound 4:05
2. "Love, Day After Tomorrow" (Day Tripper Drum'n' Bass Mix) Ohno Cybersound, Remixed by Toast 4:52
3. "Everything's All Right" Masataka Kitaura Cybersound, Remixed by Toast 4:09
4. "Everything's All Right" (Remix) Masataka Kitaura Cybersound, Remixed by Perry Geyer 5:10

Credits and personnel[edit]

Credits adapted from the liner notes of the CD single;[5]

Production and management
  • Recorded in mid-1999 at Giza Studios by Kanonji.
Credits
  • Mai Kuraki – vocals, backing vocals, songwriting
  • Aika Ohno - composer
  • Masataka Kitaura – composer
  • Michael Africk – backing vocals
  • Perry Geyer – computer programming, remix, sound producer, engineer
  • Greg Hawkes – keyboards
  • Miguel Sá Pessoa – keyboards, mix
  • Kevin Schoenbohm – backing vocals
  • DJ Dopejack – DJ
  • Leon Zervos – mastering
  • Toast – remix
  • Kanonji – production, executive producer

Charts and sales[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ McClure, Steve. "Mai Kuraki". Nippop. Retrieved July 15, 2016. 
  2. ^ Baby I Like (CD single; Liner notes). Kuraki, Mai. Bip! Records. 1999. TRJ-001. 
  3. ^ "Giza USA Artists". Giza USA. Retrieved November 8, 2011. 
  4. ^ a b c Eremenko, Alexey (2015). "Mai Kuraki – Biography & History". AllMusic. Retrieved January 21, 2017. 
  5. ^ a b c d e Love, Day After Tomorrow (CD single; Liner notes). Kuraki, Mai. Giza Studio. 1999. GZCA-1014. 
  6. ^ a b c d e "Mai Kuraki / Love, Day After Tomorrow". CD Journal (in Japanese). December 8, 1999. Retrieved January 21, 2017. 
  7. ^ Delicious Way (CD album; Liner notes). Kuraki, Mai. Giza Studio. 2000. GZCA-1039. 
  8. ^ a b Love, Day After Tomorrow (12" vinyl; Liner notes). Kuraki, Mai. Giza Studio. 1999. TJR-002. 
  9. ^ Eremenko, Alexey (2015). "Mai Kuraki – Song Highlights". AllMusic. Retrieved January 21, 2017. 
  10. ^ a b "Love, Day After Tomorrow – Mai Kuraki" (in Japanese). Oricon News. December 8, 1999. Retrieved January 21, 2017. 
  11. ^ a b "2000 Yearly CD Chart" (in Japanese). Oricon; published through Music TV Program. 1999. Retrieved January 21, 2017. 
  12. ^ a b "GOLD ALBUM 他認定作品 2000年5月度" [Gold Albums, and other certified works. May 2000 Edition] (PDF). The Record (Bulletin) (in Japanese). Chūō, Tokyo: Recording Industry Association of Japan. 486: 8. May 2000. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 22, 2014. Retrieved September 4, 2014. 
  13. ^ "Single Rankings" (in Japanese). Oricon; published through Music TV Program. 2017. Retrieved January 21, 2017. 
  14. ^ a b "Japan Hot 100 Chart". Billboard (in Japanese). September 21, 2009. Retrieved January 21, 2017. 
  15. ^ a b レコード協会調べ 3月度有料音楽配信認定 (in Japanese). Recording Industry Association of Japan. Retrieved September 5, 2013. 
  16. ^ First Cut (CD single; Liner notes). Kuraki, Mai. Giza Studio. 1999. BMBD-7001. 
  17. ^ "Mai Kuraki – Love, Day After Tomorrow" (in Japanese). YouTube. September 12, 2014. Retrieved January 21, 2017. 
  18. ^ "Mai Kuraki – Love, Day After Tomorrow (feat. 15 Directors)" (in Japanese). YouTube. September 12, 2014. Retrieved January 21, 2017. 
  19. ^ Shadows of Dreams (CD album; Liner notes). Ohno, Aika. Giza Studio. 2002. 
  20. ^ Experience First Live Tour 2001 (Live DVD; Liner notes). Kuraki, Mai. Giza Studio. 2001. BMBD-7001. 
  21. ^ "Loving You..." Tour 2002 Final 2.27 Yokohama Arena (Live DVD; Liner notes). Kuraki, Mai. Giza Studio. 2003. BMBD-7001. 
  22. ^ My Reflection (Live DVD; Liner notes). Kuraki, Mai. Gizastudio. 2004. ONBD-7031. 
  23. ^ 5th Anniversary Edition "Grow, Step by Step" (Live DVD; Liner notes). Kuraki, Mai. Giza Studio. 2005. OMBD-7046. 
  24. ^ Brilliant Cut (Live DVD; Liner notes). Kuraki, Mai. Giza Studio. 2007. VNBM-7001/4. 
  25. ^ Live Tour 2008: Touch Me! (Live DVD; Liner notes). Kuraki, Mai. Giza Studio. 2009. VNBM-7004. 
  26. ^ 10th Anniversary Mai Kuraki Tour: Best (Live DVD; Liner notes). Kuraki, Mai. Giza Studio. 2009. VNBM-7006/9. 
  27. ^ Happy Happy Halloween Live 2010 (Live DVD; Liner notes). Kuraki, Mai. Giza Studio. 2011. VNBM-7010/11. 
  28. ^ "E-girls, Mai Kuraki, and More Perform on Music Fair for January 14". Arama Japan. January 14, 2017. Retrieved January 21, 2017. 
  29. ^ "オリコンランキング情報サービス「you大樹」" [Oricon Ranking Information Service 'You Big Tree']. Oricon (in Japanese). Retrieved May 21, 2014. (subscription required (help)). 

External links[edit]