Lupton Stadium

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Lupton Baseball Stadium & Williams-Riley Field
Lupton Stadium
LuptonStadiumOutside.jpg
Lupton Stadium Entrance
Location 3700 Berry St. Fort Worth, TX
Owner Texas Christian University
Operator Texas Christian University
Capacity 4,500
Field size Left Field - 330ft (100m)
Left-Center Field - 389ft (118m)
Center Field - 400ft (122m)
Right-Center Field - 382ft (116m)
Right Field - 330ft (100m)
Surface Bermuda TIFF 419
Construction
Broke ground October 18, 2001
Opened February 2, 2003
Renovated 2014, 2016
Expanded 2010
Construction cost Original $7 million;[1] 2010 expansion $1 million; 2015 addition $2.5 million; 2016 addition $8 million
Architect Leo A. Daly Architects
Main contractors Austin Commercial
Tenants
TCU Horned Frogs baseball (NCAA) (2003-Present)

Charlie and Marie Lupton Baseball Stadium and Williams-Reilly Field is a baseball stadium located on the campus of Texas Christian University (TCU) in Fort Worth, Texas. It has been the home field of the TCU Horned Frogs baseball team since its opening on February 2, 2003.

History[edit]

Lupton Stadium, the home of TCU Horned Frogs baseball, opened in 2003 and replaced the TCU Diamond, the Horned Frogs' home from 1962 to 2002.[2] The TCU Diamond was adjacent to Amon G. Carter Stadium and Schollmaier Arena, where the Sam Baugh Indoor Practice Facility is now located.

The playing surface features the latest technology in field maintenance, including a Bermuda TIFF 419 surface. The dugouts are heated with Major League Baseball-style bat and helmet racks while a spacious home-and-visitor bullpen areas are located outside the field of play. The original $7 million stadium is a two-tiered complex with three suites, offices, two radio booths, press box, ticket office, home and visiting team locker rooms, and general player and fan facilities.

2009–10 Seating Expansion[edit]

In 2010, a $1 million project expanded upper-deck seating to bring the total capacity to 4,500 and added an auxiliary scoreboard along the first base line. Later, partially shaded party patios were constructed in the right field corner; these patios can be reserved by fans who may bring in food and beverages, including beer and wine, to the patios.

2014–15 Player Development Center Addition[edit]

Additions and renovations in 2014 and 2015 totaled $2.5 million and added the G. Malcolm Louden Player Development Center for Baseball, a 9,000 square-foot indoor/outdoor practice facility. The renovation added indoor batting cages and a field turf outdoor practice space, and moved the home bullpen to beyond the left-center field fence.[3]

2015–16 Player, Coach & Alumni Facilities Additions[edit]

An $8 million construction and renovation project in 2015–16 added a new player facility on the third base line to house a new home team locker room, team lounge, sports medicine center, equipment room, team classroom, coaches' offices and an alumni locker room; this project also included the addition of a new 40' x 23' video scoreboard in left-center field and the installation of new outfield fences and a general-admission grass berm beyond the right field wall (photo gallery).[4]

Future Renovations[edit]

An additional phase of stadium renovations is planned to renovate in-stadium fan amenities, including widening the stadium concourses, renovating suites, constructing new restrooms and concessions and renovating the main entrance.[5]

TCU Baseball Attendance[edit]

Annual total and average attendance at Lupton Stadium attendance has steadily increased since the venue opened in 2003, from approximately 1,500 fans per game to over 4,000 fans per game. The increase in attendance has coincided with the Horned Frogs’ 2010, 2014 and 2015 College World Series appearances and the 2010 Lupton Stadium seating expansion.

Total and average attendance at Lupton Stadium has ranked in the top 15 for NCAA home games since TCU’s 2011 season. In 2015, TCU and Lupton ranked 8th nationally in total attendance, 10th national in average attendance, and led all private schools in the nation in total and average attendance.

Year Home
Games
Total
Attendance
Natl. Rank
by Total
Private School
Rank by Total
Average
Attendance
Natl. Rank
by Average
Private School
Rank by Average
2003[6] 28 38,581 34 7 1,378 34 9
2004[7] 28 34,657 44 9 1,238 44 9
2005[8] 30 46,848 35 9 1,562 33 7
2006[9] 26 40,158 43 11 1,545 38 8
2007[10] 29 51,373 37 9 1,771 35 7
2008[11] 33 63,959 26 6 1,938 29 6
2009[12] 32 71,054 26 5 2,220 27 4
2010[13] 29 90,687 22 4 3,127 19 2
2011[14] 36 149,333 11 1 4,148 10 2
2012[15] 32 131,610 11 1 4,112 11 2
2013[16] 30 107,117 13 2 3,570 11 2
2014[17] 34 121,957 12 1 3,587 13 1
2015[18] 36 147,335 8 1 4,092 10 1

The record attendance of 7,383 was set in 2015 when TCU hosted Texas A&M in a 3-game NCAA Super Regional, with each game's total attendance exceeding 7,000.

Other Events[edit]

In addition to serving as the home of TCU Horned Frogs baseball, Lupton Stadium hosts Jim Schlossnagle's baseball camps and other special events for high school and club teams annually. The venue has also hosted the following Mountain West Conference tournaments, NCAA Regional tournaments and NCAA Super Regional tournaments:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ TCU Magazine More than just a dream now
  2. ^ TCU 2006 Baseball Media Guide, p. 99
  3. ^ Abigaile Massey (January 26, 2015). "New indoor baseball facility opens in time for 2015 season". TCU 360. Fort Worth, TX. Retrieved January 26, 2015. 
  4. ^ Mendez, Carlos (February 10, 2016). "TCU baseball opens door for new locker room to cheers". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Retrieved February 12, 2016. 
  5. ^ Stefan Stevenson (September 20, 2013). "TCU commits to major facility upgrade in baseball". Star Telegram. Fort Worth, TX. Retrieved September 21, 2013. 
  6. ^ "2003 Baseball Home Attendance Leaders" (PDF). NCAA. Retrieved December 30, 2015. 
  7. ^ "2004 Baseball Home Attendance Leaders" (PDF). NCAA. Retrieved December 30, 2015. 
  8. ^ "2005 Baseball Home Attendance Leaders" (PDF). NCAA. Retrieved December 30, 2015. 
  9. ^ "2006 Baseball Home Attendance Leaders" (PDF). NCAA. Retrieved December 30, 2015. 
  10. ^ "2007 Baseball Home Attendance Leaders" (PDF). NCAA. Retrieved December 30, 2015. 
  11. ^ "2008 Baseball Home Attendance Leaders" (PDF). NCAA. Retrieved December 30, 2015. 
  12. ^ "2009 Baseball Home Attendance Leaders" (PDF). NCAA. Retrieved December 30, 2015. 
  13. ^ "2010 Division I Baseball Attendance" (PDF). National Collegiate Baseball Writers' Association. June 15, 2010. Retrieved December 30, 2015. 
  14. ^ "2011 Division I Baseball Attendance" (PDF). National Collegiate Baseball Writers' Association. June 14, 2011. Retrieved December 30, 2015. 
  15. ^ "2012 Division I Baseball Attendance" (PDF). National Collegiate Baseball Writers' Association. June 12, 2012. Retrieved December 30, 2015. 
  16. ^ "2013 Division I Baseball Attendance" (PDF). National Collegiate Baseball Writers' Association. June 11, 2013. Retrieved December 30, 2015. 
  17. ^ "2014 Baseball Home Attendance Leaders" (PDF). NCAA. Retrieved December 30, 2015. 
  18. ^ "2015 Division I Baseball Attendance" (PDF). National Collegiate Baseball Writers' Association. June 9, 2015. Retrieved December 30, 2015. 

Coordinates: 32°42′11″N 97°22′21″W / 32.703136°N 97.372467°W / 32.703136; -97.372467