Lyman K. Bass

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Lyman Kidder Bass
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 31st district
In office
March 4, 1873 – March 3, 1875
Preceded by Walter L. Sessions
Succeeded by George G. Hoskins
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 32nd district
In office
March 4, 1875 – March 3, 1877
Preceded by Walter L. Sessions
Succeeded by Daniel N. Lockwood
Personal details
Born November 13, 1836 (1836-11-13)
Alden, New York
Died May 11, 1889 (1889-05-12) (aged 52)
New York, New York
Citizenship  United States
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Frances Esther Metcalfe Wolcott Bass
Children Lyman Metcalfe Bass
Alma mater Union College, Schenectady, New York



Lyman Kidder Bass (November 13, 1836 – May 11, 1889) was an American politician and a U.S. Representative from New York.


Born in the town of Alden, New York, Bass attended the common schools and was graduated from Union College, Schenectady, New York, in 1856. He studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1858. He commenced practice in Buffalo, New York. He married Frances Esther Metcalfe Wolcott and they had one child, Lyman Metcalfe Bass.[1]


In 1865, Bass ran against Grover Cleveland and was narrowly elected district attorney for Erie County.[2] He served in this role from 1865 to 1872. He was renominated in 1871, but declined to accept. In 1870, he was an unsuccessful Republican candidate for election to the Forty-second Congress.

Bass was elected as a Republican U. S. Representative for the thirty-first district of New York to the Forty-third; and as Representative for the thirty-second district to the Forty-fourth Congresses. He served from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1877.[3] Because of ill health, he declined to be a candidate for renomination in 1876. In Congress, Bass made a name for himself while serving on the House Committee on Expenditures in the War Department. During his time on the committee, it looked into spending by Secretary of War William Worth Belknap.[4]

After moving to Colorado Springs, Colorado, in 1877, Bass was asked to be an associate counsel by the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad Co. Bass worked on a case against the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway regarding the right of way through the Arkansas Canon on the route from Denver to Leadville. The case went to the U.S. Supreme Court and was won due to Bass' argument. He was then appointed chief counsel of the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad Co. and principal counsel of the Mexican National Railway.[5]


Bass died of consumption, in New York City's Buckingham Hotel on May 11, 1889 (age 52 years, 179 days). He is interred at Forest Lawn Cemetery, Buffalo, New York.[6]


  1. ^ "Lyman K. Bass". Find A Grave. Retrieved 19 August 2013. 
  2. ^ Parker, George Frederick: Recollections of Grover Cleveland, page 35. The Century Co., 1909.
  3. ^ "Lyman K. Bass". Govtrack US Congress. Retrieved 19 August 2013. 
  4. ^ The Belknap Impeachment, page 1. The New York Times, March 31, 1876.
  5. ^ Memorial and Family History of Erie County New York, Volume II, pages 39-40. The Genealogical Publishing Company, 1908.
  6. ^ "Lyman K. Bass". The Political Graveyard. Retrieved 19 August 2013. 

External links[edit]

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Walter L. Sessions
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 31st congressional district

March 4, 1873 – March 3, 1875
Succeeded by
George G. Hoskins
Preceded by
Walter L. Sessions
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 32nd congressional district

March 4, 1875 – March 3, 1877
Succeeded by
Daniel N. Lockwood

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.