Lyn Bowtell

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Lyn Bowtell
Lyn Bowtell at Tamworth Country Music Festival, January 2014
Lyn Bowtell at Tamworth Country Music Festival, January 2014
Background information
Birth nameLynette Jean Bowtell
Born(born 1976/1977
Kleinton, Queensland, Australia
GenresCountry
Occupation(s)Singer-songwriter
InstrumentsVocals, guitar
Years active1996−present
Labels
  • BMG Sony/BMG WJO Maven/Sony Checked Label Services/Kobalt
Associated acts
Websitelynbowtell.com

Lynette Jean Bowtell (born 1977) is an Australian singer-songwriter from Kleinton, Queensland. She has won nine Golden Guitar Awards at the Country Music Awards of Australia. She was primary songwriter and singer for the pop country trio, Bella (2002–2006). Bowtell has to date released three solo albums, Heart's in the Country (September 2002), Secret Songs (March 2012) and Heart of Sorrow (July 2014). Alongside her solo career, since 2015, she has also been a member of Australian super-group, Bennett Bowtell Urquhart, with Kevin Bennett (see the Flood) and Felicity Urquhart.

Life and career[edit]

Early life[edit]

Lyn Bowtell (born 1977), is the daughter of Noel Rodney Bowtell (ca. 1943 – May 2005),[1] a farmer and baker, and Glenys Fay, from Kleinton on the Darling Downs.[2] Bowtell has two older siblings.[2] Her father Noel sang and played accordion, piano, organ and drums with his father and brother at old time dances.[2] Glenys sings and plays piano accordion, auto-harp and bag-pipes.[2] On Australia Day 2019, Glenys was awarded a Medal of the Order of Australia for "service to conservation and the environment."[3][4]

Bowtell first performed at country music clubs in the Darling Downs. At age 13 she competed in her first country music festival talent quest: The Big Doo at Brymaroo.[5] As a teenager she was active in Dalby and Toowoomba Country music clubs. Her parents drove her to numerous talent quests along the east coast, including at Charters Towers CMF and at Gympie Muster.[6]

1995-2001: Southern Steel and Star Maker[edit]

In 1995 Bowtell won the Queensland Champion of Champions award.[7] In 1996 Bowtell formed the group Southern Steel in Toowoomba, with Mik McCartin on drums, Duncan Toombs on guitar, and his brother Andrew Toombs on bass guitar (later replaced by Joel Oakhill).[8] Southern Steel released their debut studio album, Headed South, in that same year. The title track, "Headed South", was written by Bowtell.[9]

In January 1997 Bowtell attended the CMAA College of Country Music, held over two weeks, in Tamworth ahead of its annual Country Music Festival where she won the Star Maker Quest for "Headed South".[10][11] Following that win, she released two singles, "The One You Love" and "Searching for Jane" (both in 1997), the latter was co-written with Margie Mason.[7][12] In the next year Bowtell won the Female Vocal section of 1998 Victorian Country Music Awards.[7] She continued to tour with Southern Steel until they disbanded in 2001. Bowtell then relocated to Central Coast, New South Wales.

2002-2006: Bella[edit]

Bowtell issued her debut solo album, Heart's in the Country, on 30 September 2002 via Canberra's ACMEC label.[13] In 2002 Bowtell joined friends Kate Ballantyne and Karen O'Shea to form country pop vocal trio, Bella in Newcastle.[7][14] The group were active until 2006, they released a studio album, Gravity and won two Golden Guitar awards for Vocal Group or Duo of the Year in 2004 and 2005.[15] The latter win was for "About a Girl", written by Bowtell.

After Bella disbanded in 2006, Bowtell had a break from her music career and undertook a Bachelor of Music and Bachelor of Education degree at University of Newcastle.[16]

2011-present: Solo Career, The Voice and Bennett Bowtell Urquhart[edit]

In 2011 Bowtell resumed her musical career, supporting Beccy Cole on the latter's Australian tour, as a rhythm guitarist, backing singer and opening act.[17] In March 2012 Bowtell released her second solo studio album, Secret Songs, which was produced by Sean Rudd via WJO Distribution.[18] The album track, "Sailing", featured vocals by American singer and folk legend, Janis Ian; the pair co-wrote the song.[18] On the ARIA Charts, Secret Songs peaked at No. 95 on the Top 100 Physical Albums, No. 8 on the Hitseekers Albums and No. 15 on the Country Albums.[19]

Bowtell, July 2015

Bowtell's third album, Heart of Sorrow, followed in July 2014.[7] It was produced by Shane Nicholson and released via Maven /Sony Music Entertainment Australia.[20] On the ARIA Charts, Heart of Sorrow, reached No. 58 on the Top 100 Physical Albums, No. 6 on the Hitseekers Albums and No. 5 on the Country Albums.[21] At the 2015 Golden Guitars, Country Music Awards of Australia, the singer-songwriter won Best Alternative Country Album for Heart of Sorrow.[22] She was also nominated for Best Female Artist and Vocal Collaboration of the Year.[23]

In 2015 Bowtell was appointed Artistic Director of the CMAA Academy of Country Music.[24] Also in that year Bowtell formed the super-group, Bennett Bowtell Urquhart with Kevin Bennett (also in the Flood) on vocals and guitar and Felicity Urquhart. During 2016 she co-wrote "F U Cancer", a single by Catherine Britt featuring Bowtell, Beccy Cole, Kasey Chambers, Josh Pyke, Wes Carr and Wendy Matthews.[25] In January 2017 Bowtell was nominated for seven Golden Guitars at the Country Music Awards of Australia, five with her group Bennett, Bowtell & Urquhart and two for collaborations with Adam Harvey and with Britt. Bennett, Bowtell & Urquhart won Best Group or Duo and Best Alternative Album while Bowtell, Britt and Cole (et Al) won Vocal Collaboration.[26]

On 7 May 2017 Bowtell successfully auditioned for The Voice Australia (season six), with her version of "Fields of Gold", and had all four judges turn their chairs.[27] Bowtell joined Team George, but was eliminated in the battle rounds with her rendition of "Why".[27] She subsequently released a six-track EP, Calling You (September 2017), including the songs "Fields of Gold" and "Let It Be", which she had performed on ‘The Voice’.[27] The EP peaked at No. 4 on the Hitseekers Albums and No. 13 on the Country Albums charts.[28] In January 2019 Bennett, Bowtell & Urquhart were nominated for three Golden Guitars at the Country Music Awards of Australia and won Vocal Collaboration of the Year for "Every Hello". In September of that year Bowtell joined Luke O'Shea on the song "Sing Me a Story", which won both Vocal Collaboration and Heritage Song of the Year at the 2020 CMAA Awards.[15]

Personal life[edit]

Since June 2012 Lyn has lived in the Hunter Valley with partner, co-manager and co-writer Damon Morton, a singer-songwriter and live sound engineer.

Discography[edit]

Albums[edit]

Title Details
Heart's in the Country
  • Released: 30 September 2002[13]
  • Label: ACMEC (ACMEC006)
  • Format: CD
Secret Songs
  • Released: 23 March 2012[29]
  • Label: Lyn Bowtell/WJO Distribution (LB003)
  • Format: digital download, CD
Heart of Sorrow
  • Released: 11 July 2014[30]
  • Label: Lyn Bowtell
  • Format: digital download, CD

Extended plays[edit]

Title Details
Calling You
  • Released: 15 September 2017[31]
  • Label: Checked Label Services
  • Format: digital download, CD, streaming

Singles[edit]

Year Title Album
1997 "The One You Love"[7] non album singles
"Searching for Jane"[7]
2012 "Beautiful Liar" Secret Songs
"Sing Along"
2014 "Heart of Sorrow" Heart of Sorrow
2015 "Happy"
"Selfish Heart"
2016 "F U Cancer"
(Catherine Britt featuring Bowtell, Kasey Chambers, Beccy Cole, Josh Pyke, Wes Carr and Wendy Matthews)[32]
non album single
2017 "He Burns"[33] Calling You
2018 "All My Life"[34]
"Fields of Gold"[35]
2019 "Sing Me a Story"
(with Luke O'Shea)[36]
There in the Ochre

Awards[edit]

Country Music Awards of Australia[edit]

The Country Music Awards of Australia (CMAA) (also known as the Golden Guitar Awards) is an annual awards night held in January during the Tamworth Country Music Festival, celebrating recording excellence in the Australian country music industry. They have been held annually since 1973.[37] For awards won with Bella see here and those won with Bennett Bowtell Urquhart see here.

Year Nominee / work Award Result
1995 herself Queensland 'Champion of Champions' Won
1997 herself Star Maker Won
2015 Heart of Sorrow Alternative Country Album of the Year Won
2017 "F U Cancer" (shared with Catherine Britt and Beccy Cole) Vocal Collaboration of the Year Won
2020 "Sing Me a Story" (shared with Luke O'Shea) Vocal Collaboration of the Year Won
Heritage Song of the Year Won
  • Note: wins only

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Ryerson Index". Ryerson Index Inc. Retrieved 31 January 2021.. Note: User must add 'Bowtell' into the Surname search parameter and 'Noel' into the Any Given Name(s) parameter.
  2. ^ a b c d "Bella's Final Celebration of Friendship and Song". InTtouch Magazine (4). 1 September 2015. Archived from the original on 14 March 2020. Retrieved 30 January 2021 – via National Library of Australia.
  3. ^ "Award Extract – Australian Honours Search Facility". Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. 26 January 2019. Retrieved 7 September 2021.
  4. ^ Landcare Australia (5 February 2019). "Landcare heroes recognised in Australia Day Honours". Landcare Australia. Archived from the original on 9 April 2019. Retrieved 7 September 2021 – via National Library of Australia.
  5. ^ https://lynbowtell.com/bio/
  6. ^ "Biography". Lyn Bowtell Official Website. Retrieved 17 September 2017.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g Dawson, Dave (20 October 2014). "Dave's Diary – Lyn Bowtell CD Review". Nu Country. Archived from the original on 7 February 2015. Retrieved 30 January 2021.
  8. ^ Leeson, Josh (20 January 2017). "Lyn Bowtell preparing for awards blitz in Tamworth". Newcastle Herald. Archived from the original on 30 January 2021. Retrieved 31 January 2021.
  9. ^ "'Headed South' at APRA search engine". APRA AMCOS (Australasian Performing Right Association, Australasian Mechanical Copyright Owners Society). Retrieved 6 September 2021. Note: For additional work user may have to select 'Search again' and then 'Enter a title:' &/or 'Performer:'
  10. ^ O'Brien, James (24 November 2003). "New Country Music Supergroup – Bella". Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). ABC New South Wales. Archived from the original on 28 February 2004. Retrieved 31 January 2021.
  11. ^ "Brief History of Star Maker". History of Country Music. Retrieved 7 May 2020.
  12. ^ "'Searching for Jane' at APRA search engine". APRA AMCOS (Australasian Performing Right Association, Australasian Mechanical Copyright Owners Society). Retrieved 6 September 2021. Note: For additional work user may have to select 'Search again' and then 'Enter a title:' &/or 'Performer:'
  13. ^ a b Kellaghan, Ronan (30 September 2002). "Week Commencing ~ 30th September 2002 ~ Issue #657" (PDF). The ARIA Report. Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) (657): 27. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2 October 2002. Retrieved 7 September 2021.
  14. ^ Dawson, Dave (25 February 2004). "Dave's Diary – Bunyip Music Festival Review". Nu Country. Archived from the original on 12 May 2004. Retrieved 7 September 2021.
  15. ^ a b "Past Award Winners". Country. Retrieved 8 May 2020.
  16. ^ Milligan, Nick (16 October 2014). "Country trio Bella reunites for special shows". Maitland Mercury. Archived from the original on 29 November 2014. Retrieved 31 January 2021.
  17. ^ Daniels, Aurora (27 March 2021). "Cole bravely bares her soul". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 6 September 2021.
  18. ^ a b Bowtell, Lyn; Ian, Janis (2012). "Secret Songs". WJO Distribution [distributor]. Retrieved 6 September 2021.
  19. ^ Wallace, Ian (23 July 2012). "Week Commencing ~ 23rd July 2012 ~ Issue #1169" (PDF). The ARIA Report. Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) (1169): 8, 20–21. Archived from the original (PDF) on 16 July 2012. Retrieved 7 September 2021.
  20. ^ Bowtell, Lyn (2014), Heart of Sorrow, Distributed by Sony Music Entertainment Australia Pty Ltd, retrieved 7 September 2021
  21. ^ Wallace, Ian (21 July 2014). "Week Commencing ~ 21st July 2014 ~ Issue #1273" (PDF). The ARIA Report. Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) (1273): 7, 21–22. Archived from the original (PDF) on 22 July 2014. Retrieved 7 September 2021.
  22. ^ Milligan, Nick (25 January 2015). "Greta singer-songwriter Lyn Bowtell wins Golden Guitar". Maitland Mercury. Archived from the original on 20 June 2015. Retrieved 7 September 2021.
  23. ^ "Golden Guitar Awards Unveil 2015 Finalists List". theMusic. Retrieved 27 September 2017.
  24. ^ "Lyn Bowtell appointed to Academy Director's Role :: Country Music Australia". country.com.au. Retrieved 27 September 2017.
  25. ^ "'F U Cancer' at APRA search engine". APRA AMCOS (Australasian Performing Right Association, Australasian Mechanical Copyright Owners Society). Retrieved 7 September 2021. Note: For additional work user may have to select 'Search again' and then 'Enter a title:' &/or 'Performer:'
  26. ^ CRAIG, HALEY (28 November 2016). "Tamworth Country Music Festivals 2017 Finalists announced". The Northern Daily Leader. Retrieved 27 September 2017.
  27. ^ a b c Fawcett-Smith, Rebecca (28 December 2017). "Lyn Bowtell Finds Her Voice". Feature Magazine. Retrieved 7 September 2021.
  28. ^ Wallace, Ian (25 September 2017). "Week Commencing ~ 25th September 2017 ~ Issue #1439" (PDF). The ARIA Report. Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) (1439): 21–22. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 October 2017. Retrieved 7 September 2021.
  29. ^ "Secret Songs". Apple Music. March 2012. Retrieved 8 May 2020.
  30. ^ "Heart of Sorrow". Apple Music. July 2014. Retrieved 8 May 2020.
  31. ^ "Calling You". Apple Music. September 2017. Retrieved 8 May 2020.
  32. ^ "F U Cancer (single)". Apple Music. Retrieved 15 December 2016.
  33. ^ "He Burns (single)". Apple Music. September 2017. Retrieved 8 May 2020.
  34. ^ "All My Life (single)". Apple Music. March 2018. Retrieved 8 May 2020.
  35. ^ "Fields of Gold (single)". Apple Music. June 2018. Retrieved 8 May 2020.
  36. ^ "Sing Me a Story (single)". Apple Music. September 2019. Retrieved 8 May 2020.
  37. ^ "Past Award Winners". Retrieved 2 November 2020.

External links[edit]