LyteShot

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LyteShot
LyteShot
LyteShot logo
Initial release 2015
Operating system Android, iOS
Website lyteshot.com

LyteShot is an interactive augmented reality gaming platform [1][2][3] that uses augmented reality with mobile phones and augmented reality smartglasses for interactive gameplay. The platform integrates sensor-based hardware which wirelessly connects to users’ mobile devices and with the Internet of Things (IoT) to share in-game data via the cloud. The platform's sensor-based peripherals connect with mobile phones to bring multi-player digital alternate reality game or first-person shooter gameplay into the real world [4][5] which adds digital components to live-action games.[6]

LyteShot platform consists of three core components to the system: a handheld device, called a "Lyter";[4][7] a receiver, called a "LytePuck",[4][7] worn by each player; and LyteShot-enabled game applications on users' Bluetooth SMART-enabled smartphones operating on either iOS or Android.[2][8][9][10] The Lyter, LytePuck, and mobile smartphone game apps connect to the cloud via Bluetooth enabling transmission of game data for types of live action role-playing games, thus eliminating the need for referees or gamekeepers.[2][8] Various peripherals, representing weapons and/or tools such as a gun or a sword, have also been developed to attach to the "Lyter" while gaming,[2][9][11] and users can also create their own attachments through design and 3D printing.[2][9][12]

LyteShot's first game release is Assassin: The Game, a first-person shooter based on the live action game of the same name.[2][13][5][14][15][16] Developers can utilize the platforms software developer kit (SDK) allowing independent users to develop their own games for use with LyteShot's hardware and mobile technology.[1][2][4][10][12]

LyteShot was named as a Consumer Electronics Show (CES) Innovation Design Award honoree in the Gaming Hardware and Accessories category.[8][17] In addition, LLteShot received Game Connections's international award for Most Original/ Creative Project as well as the Auggie Award from Augmented World Expo (AWE) for Best Game.[18] LyteShot debuted the platform at CES 2015 with Epson as a featured developer for the Epson Moverio BT-200 Smartglasses.[19]

The LyteShot company was founded in December 2012[20] by CEO Mark Ladd, an architect and specialist in 3D data visualization; and David Brooks, a mechanical engineer who left the company in 2013. Tom Ketola, a veteran of game development at companies such as Activision and Disney Interactive Studios served as CTO from May 2014 until April 2015.;[7][8][21] The company is headquartered in Chicago, Illinois.[13][14][22]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Green, Amy (November 17, 2014). "New Gaming Platform – Lyteshot". GGSGamer. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g IndieGameReviewer.com (December 8, 2014). "LyteShot - Open Source, Bluetooth & IR LARPing System - IndieCade 2014 [IGR]". YouTube. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  3. ^ Steve, Burke (January 15, 2015). "Lyteshot Introduces Augmented Reality, Outdoors Games of Assassin, Humans vs. Zombies, & More". GamersNexus. Retrieved January 15, 2015.
  4. ^ a b c d Sears, Connor (November 11, 2014). "LyteShot Game Peripheral Looks To Combine ARGs With First-Person Shooters". GamenGuide. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  5. ^ a b Stettner, Jason (December 8, 2014). "LyteShot interview - Gamerheadquarters". Gamerheadquarters. Retrieved January 4, 2015.
  6. ^ Born, Kathryn (October 22, 2013). "Indie Products from Chicago - Fall 2013". Built in Chicago. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  7. ^ a b c Damerson, Emerson (November 11, 2014). "LyteShot turns mobile gaming into a real-world adventure". Built in Chicago. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  8. ^ a b c d Beckman, Mariah (December 8, 2014). "LyteShot Interview with CEO Mark Ladd & CTO Tom Ketola". Gizorama. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  9. ^ a b c Ackerman, Mike (November 13, 2014). "Lyteshot Live Action Gaming". GameScouts. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  10. ^ a b Nelson, Noah J. (October 15, 2014). "IndieCade: Gaming's Magic 8-Ball". Turnstyle. Retrieved January 4, 2015.
  11. ^ "What We do - Fruition8". Fruition8. Retrieved January 4, 2015.
  12. ^ a b Silva, Marty (January 8, 2015). "CES 2015: LyteShot Wants to Bring Laser Tag to the Future". IGN. Retrieved January 8, 2015.
  13. ^ a b Flanagan, Will (November 12, 2014). "'The Soul of Game Making:' How LyteShot is Building a New Gaming Market Segment in Chicago". ChicagoInno. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  14. ^ a b Dallke, Jim (December 5, 2014). "15 Chicago Startups to Watch in 2015". ChicagoInno. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  15. ^ "Assassin: The Game". IndieCade. Retrieved January 4, 2015.
  16. ^ "Assassin: The Game on the App Store on iTunes". iTunes Store. Retrieved January 4, 2015.
  17. ^ "2015 CES Innovation Awards". CEA. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  18. ^ "Chicago's LyteShot Takes Home the Best Game Award at the Augmented World Expo". Chicago Inno. Retrieved 2017-02-27.
  19. ^ "LyteShot To Showcase Live-Action AR Gaming App at CES 2015". GamersFTW. Retrieved January 6, 2015.
  20. ^ "About Lyteshot". Facebook. Retrieved January 4, 2015.
  21. ^ "The LyteShot Team". LyteShot. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  22. ^ Graham, Meg (January 6, 2015). "Chicago-based LyteShot wants to take mobile gaming off the tiny screen". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved January 8, 2015.

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