Maggie Doyne

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Maggie Doyne
Maggie Doyne .jpg
Founder of The BlinkNow Foundation and Kopila Valley Children's Home, School, and Women's Center
Born
Margaret Mary Doyne

(1986-11-07) November 7, 1986 (age 32)
OccupationPhilanthropist
Notable work
Founder of The BlinkNow Foundation; Kopila Valley Children's Home, School, and Women's Center
Websitehttp://www.blinknow.org/

Maggie Doyne (Nepali: म्यागी डोएन ) (born c. 1986) is an American philanthropist who has built a children's home, women's center and school in Surkhet, Nepal. She won the CNN Hero of the Year Award in November 2015.[1]

Early life[edit]

Doyne grew up in Mendham Borough, New Jersey[2] with parents Steve and Nancy Doyne and two sisters, Kate and Libby.[3] After she was born, her father quit his job as the manager of a natural food store to be a stay-at-home dad, while her mother worked in real estate. Doyne attended West Morris Mendham High School.[4]

First visit to Nepal[edit]

In 2005, following her high school graduation, Doyne took a "gap year" to travel with the organization LeapNow. During that trip, she spent time volunteering at a children's home in northern India. While there, Doyne became friends with a refugee from Nepal and during a cease-fire in the Nepalese Civil War, went with her to visit her home village.[5]

In Nepal, Doyne met six-year-old Hima, who was barely surviving on the few rupees she earned by breaking stones in a dry riverbed and selling them. Doyne helped Hima go to school, paying for her tuition, uniform, and books, and expanded her efforts to help more children.[5] Doyne used $5,000 she had saved from babysitting to help even more children and phoned her parents at home to send her the money.[6][7]

With her money, and more funds from supporters worldwide, Doyne purchased land in the Kopila Valley. Top Malla, a Nepali that Doyne had met in India, joined her as a project partner.[8]

Her project in Nepal now runs a school, children's home, women's center, and girls' safe house.

Blinknow Foundation[edit]

The BlinkNow Foundation is a non-profit organization founded by Doyne in 2007 that provides financial support and management oversight to the Kopila Valley School, Children’s Home, Women’s Center, Health Clinic, Big Sisters' Home, and New Campus in Surkhet, Nepal. The Foundation is the sole provider of funding and is the only recipient of BlinkNow funding. The Foundation is an official 501(c)(3) organization with a US-based board. It has headquarters located in the United States and Nepal. BlinkNow operates at the grassroots level of community and focuses on promoting sustainability and self-reliance in the Surkhet community.

Kopila Valley[edit]

Kopila Valley, Doyne's project funded by The BlinkNow Foundation, encompasses a school, a children's home, a women's center, a girls' safe house, and a health clinic with a focus in sustainability.

Dissatisfied with the education her children were receiving and wanting to help other children in the community, Doyne opened the Kopila Valley School with 220 students in 2010. Many are the first in their families to attend school. The school provides students with health care and food, and employs around 50 Nepalis, including teachers, staff, a principal, vice principal, health administrator, counselor and a health technician. The curriculum supplements the Nepali national curriculum with additional teaching and learning in literature, art, theater, music and sports. Classes are taught in both Nepali and English, and stress creative and critical thinking. In 2012-2013, the school's 8th grade students took national examinations for the first time Nepal's District Level Examination. All students scored within the top 10% nationwide, 50% of students scored in the top 1% nationwide and the school was ranked first in its region for academic achievement. The school receives over 200 applications for places per year and places are offered on the basis of student need. As of 2018, over 380 children attend Kopila Valley School.

In 2007, the Kopila Valley Children’s Home opened and, gradually, Doyne became the legal guardian for more than 45 children. Together with the help of Nepali caregivers, Maggie lives at the home and cares for the children.

The Kopila Valley Women's Center opened in 2013 providing literacy and vocational skills training to the women of Surkhet. The Women’s Center also runs a storefront, partially staffed by previous trainees, located in Surkhet. The store sells goods to the local community and provides the uniforms for the Kopila Valley School.

In 2011, the Kopila Valley Health Clinic opened in partnership with the Kopila Valley School. This community health clinic’s main focus is in education and prevention. It offers essential primary care, dental care, and mental health services to the Kopila Valley children and staff, as well as the larger Surkhet community.

The Kopila Valley Big Sisters' Home opened in 2017 in order to provide a safe environment for the most at-risk young female students of Kopila Valley School. It is home to 10 girls and offers a community of counseling, love, and support as they prepare to reintegrate with their biological families or guardians.

Doyne and her team are currently working to build a new campus that will replace the existing Kopila Valley campus down the road. A team of engineers, architects, developers and environmental experts are using sustainable and green techniques to build the school. The new Kopila Valley School will reside on almost three acres of purchased land two kilometers away – serving as pre-primary school, primary school, secondary school through 12th grade, post-secondary school and vocational center. There will be 18 classrooms for about 500 students ready to learn, thrive and reach their potential. Currently, the new campus has a working farm and fruit nursery that supplies food products to the Kopila Valley School and Kopila Valley Children’s Home.

Recognition[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "CNN's 2015 Hero of the Year: Maggie Doyne - CNN.com". CNN. Retrieved 2015-11-19.
  2. ^ Mooney, Gail. "Maggie in the USA on the Fourth of July", Opening Our Eyes, July 6, 2011. Accessed December 1, 2013. "This year the award went to Maggie Doyne. Brookside is in Mendham Township, so technically, Maggie isn’t a resident because she lives in the next town over, Mendham Borough."
  3. ^ Belkin, Lisa (2010-10-22). "When A Child Moves to Nepal". The New York Times. Retrieved 2011-02-25.
  4. ^ Garber, Phil. "After A Break, Flame Still Burning Brightly For Mendham's Maggie Doyne", Observer-Tribune, September 6, 2013. Accessed December 1, 2013. "The innocent edge is gone from Maggie Doyne’s face. No longer the 18-year-old Mendham High School graduate who set out to change the world, Doyne is a woman who has achieved more in eight years than most do in 95 years."
  5. ^ a b Belkin, Lisa (2010-10-22). "When A Child Moves to Nepal". Motherlode Blog. Retrieved 2015-11-19.
  6. ^ "Change Generation: Maggie Doyne, Founder & Director, Kopila Valley Children's Home". Fast Company. 2010-11-04. Retrieved 2011-02-25.
  7. ^ An, Vickie (2009-06-05). "She's Changing the World". Time for Kids. Retrieved 2011-02-25.
  8. ^ "Our Team | BlinkNow". www.blinknow.org. Retrieved 2015-11-19.
  9. ^ "Winning beauty: CosmoGirl of the year, Maggie Doyne". CosmoGirl!. 2008-12-01. Retrieved 2011-02-25.
  10. ^ "The 2009 $100,000 Grand Prize Winner". Do Something. Retrieved 2011-02-25.
  11. ^ "From A Standing Ovation At The Forbes 400 To The Emergency Room In Nepal, A Millennial Is Saving Kids". Forbes. Retrieved 2015-11-19.
  12. ^ "Recap: The Inaugural Forbes Power Redefined Women's Summit". Forbes. Retrieved 2015-11-19.
  13. ^ "Meet Maggie Doyne, Forbes Excellence In Education Winner, Mommy To 40". Forbes. Retrieved 2015-11-19.
  14. ^ "2014 Unsung Heroes of Compassion Gallery - New Unsung Heroes". New Unsung Heroes. Retrieved 2015-11-19.

External links[edit]