Mao Amin

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Mao Amin
Native name
毛阿敏
Born1962 (age 56–57)
ResidenceHong Kong
Shanghai
NationalityChinese (Hong Kong)
OccupationSinger

Mao Amin (Chinese: 毛阿敏; pinyin: Máo Āmǐn born 1962)[1] is a Chinese singer known by the "honorific title" of Dajieda ("Big Sister"), "was one of China's most famous and senior female pop stars" by "the mid-1990s."[2] In 2001, she was one of 36 Chinese athletes and entertainers who were depicted on a series of postage stamps issued "in support of Beijing's bid for hosting the 2008 Olympic Games."[3]

Musical background in the mid-1980s[edit]

Mao along with fellow singer Liu Huan, "both household names among Chinese around the world," were "disciples" of "renowned vocal educator" Deng Zaijun.[4]

Popularity in the late 1980s[edit]

While Nimrod Baranovitch writes that Mao became famous because of her "powerful and uninhibited" voice,[5] All China Women's Federation contends that she "became famous after winning third place in the Yugoslavian International Musical Eisteddfod with Green Leaf and the Root. It was the highest honor a Chinese pop singer had ever been given in an international competition. But Mao became even more well known by singing in the Spring Festival Gala."[6] Moreover, her performance in 1988 for the Chinese New Year TV Celebration "made both song and singer extremely popular in Mainland China."[1] By the late 1980s, Mao "earned two thousand yuan for a single performance as China's biggest pop star..."[7] The New Straits Times described her as "China's most popular singer," who "retains a nationalistic flavour in her songs," and "China's top pop singer for the past four years" before 1990.[8]

Legal troubles in 1989[edit]

In 1989, "Mao, China's biggest pop star, was caught lying to the Beijing Evening News about under-the-table payments for performances in Harbin. In the ensuing scandal, she was fined 34,000 yuan and forced to pay 15,000 yuan in back taxes."[9]

Transformation in 1990s[edit]

Following her legal troubles, Mao underwent a transformation towards seemingly feminist music, such as her 1994 single "Real Woman" off of her self-titled album. These mid-1990s efforts received criticism as lacking the spirit and power of her 1980s work.[2]

Family life in the 2000s[edit]

In December 2006, "Chinese media has reported that...well-known Chinese singer, Mao Amin and her husband welcomed a second child into their family, a little brother for their two-year-old daughter."[10]

Filmography[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Zu-yan Chen, Robert Daly, and Hong Zhang, Chinese Through Song (2001), 1994.
  2. ^ a b Nimrod Baranovitch, China's new voices: popular music, ethnicity, gender, and politics, 1978-1997 (2003), 146
  3. ^ "Chinese Stars to Be on Stamps to Support Olympic Bid," People's Daily (June 04, 2001).
  4. ^ Lin Shujuan, "SWEET NEW SINGER Archived 2011-06-06 at the Wayback Machine," China Daily (07/22/2005): 6.
  5. ^ Nimrod Baranovitch, China's new voices: popular music, ethnicity, gender, and politics, 1978-1997 (2003), 145
  6. ^ 10 Epoch-making Women Singers in China over the Past Three Decades[permanent dead link]," All-China Women's Federation (November 14, 2008).
  7. ^ Richard Curt Kraus, The party and the arty in China: the new politics of culture (2004), 195.
  8. ^ ST, "China's Best Artistes," New Straits Times (Feb 8, 1990): 10.
  9. ^ Deborah Davis, Urban spaces in contemporary China: the potential for autonomy and community (1995), 186.
  10. ^ Meg Jalsevac, "China’s Wealthy Citizens Find Ways to Side-Step One Child Policy: Chinese government confirms that policy will continue to be enforced," LifeSiteNews.com (January 9, 2007).