Cheng Muyang

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Cheng Muyang
程慕阳
Born14 November 1969
NationalityChinese
Other namesMichael Ching, Ching Mo-yeung
OccupationBusinessman and property developer

Cheng Muyang (Chinese: 程慕阳; born 14 November 1969),[1] also known as Michael Ching and Ching Mo-yeung, is a Chinese businessman and property developer based in Vancouver, Canada. His father, Cheng Weigao, is a high-ranking Chinese politician.

In 1996, he was granted permanent residency in Canada, and he has applied for refugee status to flee political persecution from the Chinese government.

Biography[edit]

Cheng Muyang was born on November 14, 1969 as one of three children and the only son of Cheng Weigao, who at the time was the head of a tractor factory in Changzhou, Jiangsu Province. The elder Cheng was known for his role as the Communist Party Secretary of Hebei province between 1993 and 1998.[citation needed] Ching attended Zhengzhou Industrial College in Zhengzhou, the capital of Henan. He later acquired permanent residence in Hong Kong,[2] and in 1996, he was granted permanent residency in Canada.[3]

Michael Ching was accused by the Chinese government of having taken illicit commissions for a business deal using his father for political backing.[4] Michael Ching moved to Canada in 2000, shortly before the Hebei procuratorate issued his arrest warrant.[1][5] In 2006, the Chinese Central Commission for Discipline Inspection concluded that there was no evidence for criminal punishment of Cheng Weigao.[6]

After moving to Vancouver, Canada in July 2000, he founded a land development company called Mo Yeung International.[4] In 2002, he founded Sunwins which is a real estate development company in Vancouver.[7] In 2012, Michael Ching received the Queen Elizabeth II's Diamond Jubilee Medal.[8] In 2013, Michael Ching's application for Canadian citizenship was rejected, and as of 2015, his bid for refugee status was denied.[4][9] Ching denied all allegations and sued the Canadian government for $1.75 million (CAD) for conspiring against him.[4]

In July 2015, a Canadian federal judge ordered that Ching’s bid for refugee status be reconsidered.[3] According to the judge, Justice Yvan Roy, the refugee panel that denied Ching’s application relied too heavily on Chinese court findings that had little or no evidence of illegal activity.[3][10]

As of September 2016, Interpol no longer listed Ching as an international fugitive and deleted its "red notice" for him.[11][12] Ching has filed legal action against the South China Morning Post and its reporter in the British Columbia Supreme Court for defamation and false statements.[9][12] After 15 years fighting, In Dec 2020,Michael Ching received his Canadian citizenship.

Residency[edit]

In 1996, he was granted permanent residency in Canada. He has applied for refugee status as protection from political persecution after being considered a fugitive of law by the Chinese government along with his father, Cheng Weigao, a high-ranking Chinese politician.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "加方确认迈克尔·程即程慕阳 为落马高官程维高之子" (in Chinese). Xinhua. 5 May 2015.
  2. ^ "起底程慕阳:空手套白狼起家 曾与女演员相恋". Tencent. 13 May 2015.
  3. ^ a b c d "Michael Ching Mo Yeung, wanted by China, wins Canadian court bid to have refugee case reheard". South China Morning Post. 2015-07-16. Retrieved 2019-12-30.
  4. ^ a b c d "Mo Yeung (Michael) Ching, Vancouver developer, accused of embezzlement in China". CBC. 2 May 2015.
  5. ^ "河北前書記兒子 持港身份證潛逃加國". Apple Daily (Hong Kong). 22 April 2015.
  6. ^ "中纪委:目前尚无证据表明程维高应负刑事责任-搜狐新闻". news.sohu.com. Retrieved 2020-01-27.
  7. ^ "About Us". Sunwins. Retrieved 2020-03-26.
  8. ^ General, Office of the Secretary to the Governor. "Michael Mo Yeung Ching". The Governor General of Canada. Retrieved 2020-02-12.
  9. ^ a b "Chinese graft fugitive Cheng Muyang, now a Canada property mogul, seeks refugee status". South China Morning Post. 30 April 2015.
  10. ^ "Embattled Vancouver developer claims legal win in bid to stay in Canada". The Globe and Mail. 15 May 2018.
  11. ^ "B.C. rights group questions Justin Trudeau's plan for extradition deal with China". Vancouver Sun. 22 September 2016.
  12. ^ a b "Canada's immigration department retracts depiction of fugitive Ching Mo Yeung as criminal and fraudster". South China Morning Post. 8 May 2015.