Mississippi primary election, 2007

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The Mississippi Primary Election of 2007 was held on August 7 to determine the party nominees of various statewide and legislative offices. Races were held only for contested nominations. A run-off election was held on August 28 for those races where no candidate received a majority of the vote.

Statewide races[edit]

Candidates shown in bold are the primary winners.

Governor[edit]

Republican
Candidate Votes Vote %
Haley Barbour (i) 184,036 93.1%
Frederick Jones 13,611 6.9%
TOTALS 197,647 100%
Democratic
Candidate Votes Vote %
John Arthur Eaves, Jr. 314,012 70.3%
William Compton, Jr. 52,343 11.7%
Fred T. Smith 49,170 11.0%
Louis Fondren 31,197 7.0%
TOTALS 446,722 100%

Lieutenant Governor[edit]

Republican
Candidate Votes Vote %
Phil Bryant 112,140 57.1%
Charlie Ross 84,110 42.9%
TOTALS 196,250 100%

Jamie Franks, the Democratic Party candidate, ran unopposed.

Secretary of State[edit]

Republican
Candidate Votes Vote %
Delbert Hosemann 102,093 53.8%
Mike Lott 61,697 32.5%
Jeffrey Rupp 17,838 9.4%
Gene Sills 8,128 4.3%
TOTALS 189,756 100%
Democratic
Candidate Votes Vote %
Robert H. Smith 308,003 72.7%
Jabari A. Toins 34,409 8.1%
John Windsor 81,464 19.2%
TOTALS 423,876 100%

Attorney General[edit]

Jim Hood, the incumbent Democrat Attorney General, ran unopposed.

Al Hopkins, the Republican candidate, ran unopposed.

State Auditor[edit]

State Treasurer[edit]

Shawn O'Hara, the Democrat candidate, ran unopposed.

Commissioner for Agriculture and Commerce[edit]

Rickey Cole, the Democrat candidate, ran unopposed.

Commissioner for Insurance[edit]

Commissions[edit]

Public Service Commission[edit]

Northern District[edit]

Central District[edit]

Southern District[edit]

Transportation Commission[edit]

Northern District[edit]

Central District[edit]

Rudy Warnock, the Democrat candidate, ran unopposed.

Southern District[edit]

Legislative races[edit]

House of Representatives[edit]

The Democrats did not run candidates in Districts 6, 7, 8, 35, 40, 46, 52, 56, 58, 59, 60, 62, 64, 74, 81, 83, 88, 95, 97, 101, 104, 106, 108, 112, 113, 114, 116, 117, and 118. Therefore, barring a successful contest by a write-in candidate, the Republican primary winners in each district would win the general election.

Senate[edit]

The Democrats did not run candidates in Districts 1, 14, 15, 17, 20, 30, 33, 35, 40, 44, 45, 49, and 50. Therefore, barring a successful contest by a write-in candidate, the Republican primary winners in each district would win the general election.