Movin' Wes

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Movin' Wes
Wesmovin.jpg
Studio album by Wes Montgomery
Released 1964
Recorded November 11, 16, 1964 at A&R Studios, New York City
Genre Jazz
Label Verve
Producer Creed Taylor
Wes Montgomery chronology
The Alternative Wes Montgomery
(1963)
Movin' Wes
(1964)
Bumpin'
(1965)

Movin' Wes is the twelfth album by American jazz guitarist Wes Montgomery, released in 1964. It reached number 18 on the Billboard Jazz Albums chart in 1967, his second album to reach the charts following the success of his later release Bumpin'.

History[edit]

Movin' Wes was Montgomery's debut album on the Verve label. Produced by Creed Taylor, the album sold more than 100,000 copies initially, Montgomery's biggest seller to this point in his career.[1]

Reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 3/5 stars[2]
The Rolling Stone Jazz Record Guide 4/5 stars[3]

In his Allmusic review, music critic Scott Yanow wrote: "although better from a jazz standpoint than his later A&M releases, is certainly in the same vein. The emphasis is on his tone, his distinctive octaves, and his melody statements."[2]

Track listing[edit]

  1. "Caravan" (Duke Ellington, Irving Mills, Juan Tizol) – 2:39
  2. "People" (Bob Merrill, Jule Styne) – 4:23
  3. "Movin' Wes, Pt. 1" (Wes Montgomery) – 3:31
  4. "Moça Flor" (Durval Ferreira, Lula Freire) – 3:12
  5. "Matchmaker, Matchmaker" (Jerry Bock, Sheldon Harnick) – 2:52
  6. "Movin' Wes, Pt. 2" (Montgomery) – 2:55
  7. "Senza Fine" (Gino Paoli, Alec Wilder) – 3:28
  8. "Theodora" (Billy Taylor) – 3:58
  9. "In and Out" (Montgomery) – 2:53
  10. "Born to Be Blue" (Mel Tormé, Robert Wells) – 3:40
  11. "West Coast Blues" (Montgomery) – 3:12

Personnel[edit]

Production notes:

Chart positions[edit]

Year Chart Position
1967 Billboard Top Jazz Albums 18

References[edit]

  1. ^ Woodard, Josef (July–August 2005). "Wes Montgomery: The Softer Side of Genius'". JazzTimes. 
  2. ^ a b Yanow, Scott. "Movin' Wes > Review". Allmusic. Retrieved December 22, 2010. 
  3. ^ Swenson, J. (Editor) (1985). The Rolling Stone Jazz Record Guide. USA: Random House/Rolling Stone. p. 146. ISBN 0-394-72643-X.