Muhadžer Talinovac

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Muhadžer Talinovac (in Serbian; Мухаџер Талиновац) or Talinoc i Muhaxhirëve (in Albanian) or Talinovce is a village located in the municipality of Ferizaj in Kosovo.

Name[edit]

The village was also known as Muhadžer-Talinovac (Мухацер-Талиновац) and Muadžer Talinovac (Муаџер Талиновац).

Geography[edit]

It is situated on the slopes of Žegovac, by the Sitnica river.

History[edit]

The settlement was founded by Albanian muhajirs in the second half of the 19th century, hence the name. The Albanians left the settlement during the Balkan Wars for Turkey, after which it was settled by Serbs. Prior to World War II, the village had approximately 60 Serb houses and 30 Albanian houses. After the war, the population structure shifted with increasing number of Albanians, so that in the 1990s, there were roughly twice the number of Albanians than Serbs.[1]

After the Kachak movement in Kosovo and Metohija between 1918–1924, the Yugoslav government disarmed the village, which was administratively part of the Nerodimlje srez.[2]

Demographics[edit]

According to the 1981 census, there were 1133 inhabitants, out of whom 730 (64.43%) were Albanians and 394 (34.77%) were Serbs. According to the 2011 census, the village had 1961 inhabitants, out of whom Albanians were 99,08%.

Serb refugees[edit]

A married couple of Serbs, war refugees who had returned to the village, were murdered in their house on 6 July 2012. After the murders, the village Serbs asked the government to secure their relocation to either Strpce or Gracanica, or else they were to leave for Central Serbia.[3][4]

Before the Kosovo War, the village was ethnically mixed, with ca. 300 Serbs. In 1999, all Serbs were expelled. In 2006, 30 Serbs returned to the village. Until the murders, 18 Serbs lived in the village.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Contributions onomatologiques. 13url=https://books.google.com/books?id=BY9iAAAAMAAJ. Akademija. 1997. pp. 420–421.
  2. ^ Dragi Maliković (2005). Kačački pokret na Kosovu i Metohiji: 1918-1924. Institut za srpsku kulturu. p. 147.
  3. ^ a b http://www.glasamerike.net/media/video/1364899.html. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  4. ^ http://rtrs.tv/vijesti/vijest.php?id=64865

Coordinates: 42°23′33″N 21°10′29″E / 42.3925°N 21.1747°E / 42.3925; 21.1747