Norm Miller

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Norm Miller
MPP
Member of the Ontario Provincial Parliament
for Parry Sound—Muskoka
Assumed office
March 22, 2001
Preceded by Ernie Eves
Personal details
Born 1956 (age 60–61)
Political party Progressive Conservative
Relations Frank Miller (Father)
Occupation Airline pilot

Norm Miller (born 1956) is a politician in Ontario, Canada. He is a member of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario, representing the riding of Parry Sound—Muskoka for the Progressive Conservatives. His father, Frank Miller, was also a Progressive Conservative MPP from the region for many years, and briefly served as Premier of Ontario in 1985.

Background[edit]

Miller started a Muskoka Young Progressive Conservative organization in 1975, and has been active in the party since this time. He is a commercial pilot and has served as president of Muskoka Tourism.

Politics[edit]

Miller was elected to the Ontario legislature in a 2001 by-election, called after Ernie Eves resigned his seat in the legislature; he defeated Liberal Evelyn Brown by about 4000 votes.[1] In April 2002, Miller was appointed as Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Northern Development and Mines.

Miller was re-elected by an increased margin in the 2003 provincial election, although the Progressive Conservatives were reduced to only 24 out of 103 seats in the legislature as the Liberals won a commanding majority.[2] In 2004, he supported John Tory in the latter's successful bid to succeed Eves as leader of the Progressive Conservative Party.

He was re-elected in 2007, 2011, and 2014.[3][4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Former premier's son winner of byelection". Cambridge Reporter. March 23, 2001. p. A7. 
  2. ^ "Summary of Valid Ballots by Candidate". Elections Ontario. October 2, 2003. Retrieved 2014-03-02. 
  3. ^ "Summary of Valid Ballots Cast for Each Candidate" (PDF). Elections Ontario. October 10, 2007. p. 12 (xxi). Retrieved 2014-03-02. 
  4. ^ "Summary of Valid Ballots Cast for Each Candidate" (PDF). Elections Ontario. October 6, 2011. p. 14. Retrieved 2014-03-02. 

External links[edit]