Osseoincorporation

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Osseoincorporation refers to the healing potential of bone onto an implant surface and into an implant structure. Three-dimensional, porous implantable materials used in the orthopedic and dental implant industries offer the potential for ingrowth as well as ongrowth[1][2][3] or osseoincorporation.

Comparison to osseointegration[edit]

Conventional textured or coated implant surfaces are designed to achieve bone-to-implant contact, which is called ongrowth.[4] Per-Ingvar Brånemark defined this ongrowth phenomenon, osseointegration, as "the direct structural and functional connection between ordered, living bone and the surface of a load-carrying implant."[5] In the case of dental implants, they osseointegrate.[6] Porous implantable materials are designed for bone to grow not only onto the material but also into its pores, and in some cases interconnecting within the material’s structure, in a process called osseoincorporation.[7][8][9][10][11]

Complications[edit]

In some cases, the patient has periodontal defects (damaged or poor bone structure) which hinder osseointegration. Guided tissue and/or bone regeneration may be necessary before the bone can osseointegrate with the dental implant. In this case a combination of barrier membranes, bone tacks, and supplemental autogenous bone may be required to promote proper osseointegration. In addition, implant surface modification has been studied and now integrated, thus promoting an optimal tissue-implant interface (i.e. osseointegration, implant-gingival seal)[12][13][14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Unger, AS. "Evaluation of a porous tantalum uncemented actetabular cup in revision total hip arthoplasty. Clinical and radiological results of 60 hips". J Arthroplasty, 2005, p 1002-1009
  2. ^ Cohen R. "A porous tantalum trabedcular metal: basic science". Am J Orthrop, 2002, p. 216-217
  3. ^ Bobyn JD. "UHMWPE: the good, bad, & ugly. Fixation and bearing surfaces for the next millennium". Orthop, 1999, p. 810-812
  4. ^ Branemark PI. "Introduction to osseointegration". In Branemark PI, Zarb GA, and Albrektsson T. eds.: Tissue-Integrated Prosthese. Osseointegration in Clinical Dentistry. Chicago, IL: Quintessence Publishing Co, Inc.: 1985, p. 11-76
  5. ^ Branemark PI. "Introduction to osseointegration". In Branemark PI, Zarb GA, and Albrektsson T. eds.: Tissue-Integrated Prosthese. Osseointegration in Clinical Dentistry. Chicago, IL: Quintessence Publishing Co, Inc.: 1985, p. 11-76
  6. ^ Osseointegration Study, Journal of Oral Implantology, 2001—Burton E. Balkin et al.
  7. ^ Unger, AS. "Evaluation of a porous tantalum uncemented actetabular cup in revision total hip arthoplasty. Clinical and radiological results of 60 hips". J Arthroplasty, 2005, p 1002-1009
  8. ^ Cohen R. "A porous tantalum trabedcular metal: basic science". Am J Orthrop, 2002, p. 216-217
  9. ^ Bobyn JD. "UHMWPE: the good, bad, & ugly. Fixation and bearing surfaces for the next millennium". Orthop, 1999, p. 810-812
  10. ^ Tsao AK. "Biomechanical and clinical evaluations of a porous tantaluym implant for the treatment of early-stage osteonecrosis". J Bone Joint Surg, 2005, p.22-27
  11. ^ Bobyn JD. "Clinical validation of a structural porous tantalum biomaterial for adult reconstruction". J Bone Joint Surg, 2004, p. 123-129
  12. ^ E.T. den Braber, H.V. Jansen, M.J. de Boer, H.J.E. Croes, M. Elwenspoek, and J.A. Jansen, Scanning electron microscopic, transmission electron microscopic, and confocal laser scanning microscopic observation of fibroblasts cultured on microgrooved surfaces of bulk titanium substrata, J. Biomed. Mater. Res., 1998, 425-433
  13. ^ S. Raghavendra, M. C. Wood, T. D. Taylor. Early wound healing adjacent to endosseous dental implants: A review of the literature. Int. J. Oral Maxillofac. Implants., 2005, 425–31
  14. ^ F. Rupp, L. Scheideler, N. Olshanska, M. de Wild, M. Wieland, J. Geis-Gerstorfer. Enhancing surface free energy and hydrophilicity through chemical modification of microstructured titanium implant surfaces. J. Biomed. Mater. Res. A. 2006, 323–33 4