Patrick Lalor

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Patrick Lalor
Government Chief Whip
In office
5 July 1977 – 1 July 1979
Taoiseach Jack Lynch
Preceded by John Kelly
Succeeded by Michael Woods
Minister of State at the Department of Defence
In office
5 July 1977 – 1 July 1979
Taoiseach Jack Lynch
Preceded by John Kelly
Succeeded by Michael Woods
Minister for Industry and Commerce
In office
9 May 1970 – 14 March 1973
Taoiseach Jack Lynch
Preceded by George Colley
Succeeded by Justin Keating
Minister for Posts and Telegraphs
In office
2 July 1969 – 9 May 1970
Taoiseach Jack Lynch
Preceded by Erskine H. Childers
Succeeded by Gerry Collins
Member of the European Parliament
In office
1979–1994
Constituency Leinster
Teachta Dála
In office
June 1961 – June 1981
Constituency Laois–Offaly
Personal details
Born Patrick Joseph Lalor
(1926-07-21)21 July 1926
Portlaois, Laois, Ireland
Died 29 July 2016(2016-07-29) (aged 90)
Abbeyleix, Laois, Ireland
Nationality Irish
Political party Fianna Fáil
Spouse(s) Myra Lalor[1]
Children 4

Patrick Joseph "Paddy" Lalor (21 July 1926 – 29 July 2016) was an Irish Fianna Fáil politician and former hurling player for Laois. He was a Teachta Dála (TD) for Laois–Offaly between 1961 and 1981, and a government minister on two separate occasions during the 19th Dáil. He later represented Leinster in the European Parliament from 1979 to 1994.

Hurling career[edit]

Lalor was a member of the Laois team that won the Leinster Senior Hurling Championship in 1949. The team went on to compete in the All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship final but lost to Tipperary.[2] Later that year he helped his club Abbeyleix to win the Laois Senior Hurling Championship. Between 1953-1956, Lalor was county secretary of Laois GAA.[3]

He played football and hurling for his club and county for many years and is generally regarded as one of the most skilful hurlers to have pulled on the Blue and White jersey of Laois. This was evidenced by his selection in 1999 on the Laois Hurling Team of the Millennium.[4]

Political career[edit]

Lalor was elected to Dáil Éireann on his first attempt at the 1961 general election as a Fianna Fáil TD for Laois–Offaly in the 17th Dáil.[5] In 1965, he was appointed Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Agriculture. The following year, Lalor became Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Transport and Power and Posts and Telegraphs.[6] Following the 1969 election, Lalor joined the cabinet of Jack Lynch as Minister for Posts and Telegraphs. In the cabinet reshuffle that took place following the Arms Crisis in 1970, he took over the Industry and Commerce portfolio, serving in that position until the 1973 general election, when a Fine GaelLabour Party coalition took power.[7]

Fianna Fáil was re-elected in a landslide victory at the 1977 general election and Lalor became Parliamentary Secretary to the Taoiseach and to the Minister for Defence.[8] In 1979, he was elected to the European Parliament for the Leinster constituency[2] and did not stand for a fifth re-election in the 1981 general election.[5][9] He was re-elected to the European Parliament in 1984 and 1989, before retiring from politics in 1994. During his time as a member of the European Parliament, he was vice-chair of the parliamentary grouping the European Progressive Democrats and its successor the European Democratic Alliance. He was also a Vice President of the European Parliament from 1982 to 1987.[10]

Personal life[edit]

Lalor died on 29 July 2016 at the age of 90. He was survived by his four children Frances, Helen, Joseph and Veronica. Fianna Fáil leader Micheál Martin paid tribute to Lalor saying he "had a very distinguished career and represented the people of Laois/Offaly with great pride."[1] Lalor's funeral took place on 1 August 2016 in Abbeyleix accompanied by a guard of honour from the GAA and Fianna Fail cumann.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Former minister Patrick Lalor dies aged 90". RTE. 30 July 2016. Retrieved 2016-07-30. 
  2. ^ a b MacConnell, Eoghan (30 July 2016). "Death occurs of former Fianna Fáil minister Paddy Lalor". The Irish Times. Retrieved 2 August 2016. 
  3. ^ "Laois G.A.A. History 1947 - 1999". Laois GAA. Retrieved 2 August 2016. 
  4. ^ "Laois mourn Leinster winning hurler Paddy Lalor". Hogan Stand. Retrieved 2 August 2016. 
  5. ^ a b "Mr. Patrick J. Lalor". Oireachtas. Retrieved 30 September 2012. 
  6. ^ "History of Government: Eighteenth Dáil". Government of Ireland. Retrieved 2 August 2016. 
  7. ^ "History of Government: Nineteenth Dáil". Government of Ireland. Retrieved 2 August 2016. 
  8. ^ "History of Government: Twenty-First Dáil". Government of Ireland. Retrieved 3 August 2016. 
  9. ^ "General Election: 11 June 1981 - Laoighis–Offaly". Elections Ireland. Retrieved 2 August 2016. 
  10. ^ "(Paddy) Patrick Joseph LALOR". European Parliament. Retrieved 2 August 2016. 
  11. ^ "Former Fianna Fail Minister laid to rest in Laois". Leinster Express. Retrieved 2 August 2016. 
Political offices
Preceded by
Erskine H. Childers
Minister for Posts and Telegraphs
1969–1970
Succeeded by
Gerry Collins
Preceded by
George Colley
Minister for Industry and Commerce
1970–1973
Succeeded by
Justin Keating