Raorchestes parvulus

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Raorchestes parvulus
Raorchestes parvulus (Boulenger, 1893).jpg
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Amphibia
Order: Anura
Family: Rhacophoridae
Genus: Raorchestes
Species: R. parvulus
Binomial name
Raorchestes parvulus
(Boulenger, 1893)
Synonyms

Ixalus parvulus Boulenger, 1893[2]
Philautus parvulus (Boulenger, 1893)

Raorchestes parvulus (common names: Karin bubble-nest frog, tiny bubble-nest frog, dwarf bushfrog) is a species of frog in the Rhacophoridae family. It is found in Bangladesh east through Myanmar and non-peninsular Thailand to Cambodia, northern Vietnam and Laos; it is also reported from Hulu Perak in Peninsular Malaysia.[3] This species was first described by George Albert Boulenger based on seven specimens collected by Leonardo Fea from Karen Hills, Burma.[2]

Description[edit]

Raorchestes parvulus are small frogs. Males measure about 23 mm (0.91 in) in snout-vent length and have a large vocal sack. They have a rounded snout and hidden tympanum. Their feet have short fingers/toes and are equipped with adhesive discs; fingers are free from webbing but toes are slightly webbed at their base.[2]

Habitat[edit]

This widespread frog is more easily heard than seen. It inhabits primarily open habitats, including forest edges, open scrub forests, and reed patches.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b van Dijk, P.P. & Ohler, A. (2009). "Raorchestes parvulus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.1. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 9 November 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c Boulenger, G. A. (1893). "Concluding report on the reptiles and batrachians obtained in Burma by Signor L. Fea dealing with the collection made in Pegu and the Karin Hills in 1887-88". Annali del Museo Civico di Storia Naturale di Genova. 13: 304–347. 
  3. ^ Frost, Darrel R. (2013). "Raorchestes parvulus (Boulenger, 1893)". Amphibian Species of the World 5.6, an Online Reference. American Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 9 November 2013. 

External links[edit]