Phoenix Children's Hospital

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Phoenix Children's Hospital
Children's Healthcare of Arizona, Inc.
Phoenix children's logo.svg
Phoenix Children's Hospital.jpg
The front of the new structure.
Geography
Location1919 E. Thomas Rd., Phoenix, Arizona, United States
Coordinates33°28′44″N 112°02′30″W / 33.478909°N 112.041576°W / 33.478909; -112.041576Coordinates: 33°28′44″N 112°02′30″W / 33.478909°N 112.041576°W / 33.478909; -112.041576
Organization
Care systemPrivate
FundingNon-profit hospital
TypeSpecialized
Affiliated universityUniversity of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Services
Emergency departmentLevel I Regional Pediatric Trauma Center
Beds433 licensed beds
Helipads
Number Length Surface
ft m
H1 46 x 46 14 × 14 aluminum
H2 40 x 40 12 × 12 roof
History
Opened1983
Links
Websitewww.phoenixchildrens.org
ListsHospitals in Arizona

Phoenix Children's Hospital is a freestanding pediatric acute care children's hospital located in Phoenix, Arizona. The hospital has 381 pediatric beds[1] and is affiliated with the University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix. Phoenix Children's also partners with Maricopa Integrated Health System for a 3-year pediatric residency training program. The hospital provides comprehensive pediatric specialties and subspecialties including inpatient, outpatient, emergency, trauma, and urgent care to infants, children, teens, and young adults 0-21[2][3][4] throughout Arizona and the surrounding states. The hospital sometimes also treats older adults that require pediatric care.[5] Phoenix Children's Hospital also features a Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center, the only in the state.[6] Specialty and urgent care centers are located in Mesa, Scottsdale, Glendale, Avondale with additional specialty care services in Chandler, Gilbert, Tucson, Yuma and Flagstaff.

History[edit]

Phoenix Children's Hospital was founded in July 1980 with the idea to provide pediatric care for the region. The hospital officially opened in 1983 as an independent children's hospital that was physically located within Good Samaritan Hospital.[7] With 124 dedicated pediatric beds, it operated there for nearly 20 years. In September 1985 the hospital performed the first pediatric liver transplant in Arizona. A year later the hospital expanded to take over all of Good Samaritan's pediatric services adding 24 beds with the acquisition, again expanding in 1993 adding another 24 beds for a total of 172 pediatric beds.

In 1999, the hospital purchased a 22-acre plot that was originally occupied by the Phoenix Regional Medical Center for construction of a new freestanding children's hospital. In September 2000, demolition of the old hospital began to make way for the construction on a new freestanding hospital to cope with the large increase in demand for pediatric care.

Phoenix Children's opened as Arizona's only freestanding specialized pediatric hospital in May 2002 with 230 pediatric beds, and the only pediatric emergency department in Arizona.

In spring 2008, the hospital opened a new $23 million Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), which was one of the largest of its kind in the country.[8]

In 2011, an 11-story tower was opened as the centerpiece of a 37-acre campus including the original East Building, two medical office buildings, a Central Energy Plant, three parking structures, an administration building and a Ronald McDonald House.[9]

In 2016, Phoenix Children's was designated by the Arizona Department of Health Services as the only pediatric Advanced Life Support (ALS) Base Hospital in the state.[10]

In 2017 Phoenix Children's unveiled a new $40 million, 42,300 square foot, 75 room Emergency Department, and nine bay Level 1 Trauma facility to allow more children to be seen more efficiently.[11][12]

In the spring of 2021, a building collaboration between Dignity Health and Phoenix Children's will be opening on the campus of Mercy Gilbert Medical Center.[13] The new building will be named the Women's and Children's Pavilion and feature a 60-bed level III NICU, 24 bed pediatric inpatient unit, 24 bed pediatric emergency department, 18 pre-op rooms, 6 operating rooms, and 12 Post-Anesthesia Care Units.[14][15]

Services[edit]

In 2013, Modern Healthcare listed Phoenix Children's as one of the largest children's hospitals in the country.[16] Phoenix Children's employs more than 220 pediatric specialists with more than 1,000 pediatric specialists on its Medical Staff and more than 1,000 FTEs on its nursing staff. This represents the largest pediatric group in the state of Arizona. The hospital also works in collaboration with Dignity Health and Mayo Clinic to provide more robust care in specialties related to cardiology, neurology, hematology/oncology and organ transplant.

The hospital has six Centers of Excellence: Barrow Neurological Institute at Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix Children's Heart Center, Center for Pediatric Orthopedics, Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Level One Pediatric Trauma Center,[17] and the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

Phoenix Children's Hospital new patient tower at night.

Barrow Neurological Institute[edit]

The Barrow Neurological Institute at Phoenix Children's hospital, also called Barrow at Phoenix Children's, is the neurological and neurosurgery Center of Excellence at Phoenix Children's Hospital in Phoenix, Arizona. It is one of six Centers of Excellence at the hospital. The institute is located on the main campus of Phoenix Children's Hospital with satellite clinics across central Arizona.[18]

Barrow at Phoenix Children's offers comprehensive inpatient and outpatient neurological care and services to infants, children, and teens with neurological-related problems. It performs treatment, education, and research and is the largest pediatric neuroscience center in the Southwest. The institute is led by neurosurgeon P. David Adelson, MD.[19]

As part of Phoenix Children's Hospital, Barrow at Phoenix Children's is also affiliated with the University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix, providing the pediatric training for medical students there. Phoenix Children's partners with Maricopa Integrated Health System for a combined medical/pediatric residency program.

Each year, Barrow at Phoenix Children's hosts a number of educational conferences and opportunities for medical professionals, including an annual Children's Neuroscience Symposium and weekly Grand Rounds.[20] The Division of Developmental Pediatrics trains physicians to diagnose autism in children through the Early Access to Care - AZ Program, which increases the accessibility of services for children with autism and other developmental disorders.[21]

Awards[edit]

Phoenix Children's is rated by U.S. News and World Report as a Best Children's Hospital and is ranked in all 10 specialties listed by the report.[22] It is also one of the Leapfrog group's Top Children's Hospitals[23] and a recipient of the Joint Commission's Gold Seal of Approval[24]

2021 U.S. News and World Report Rankings for Phoenix Children's[25]
Specialty Rank (In the U.S.) Score (Out of 100)
Neonatology #20 83.4
Pediatric Cancer #35 74.9
Pediatric Diabetes & Endocrinology #39 66.6
Pediatric Gastroenterology & GI Surgery #34 74.0
Pediatric Nephrology #33 69.4
Pediatric Neurology & Neurosurgery #29 77.0
Pediatric Orthopedics #23 74.0
Pediatric Pulmonology & Lung Surgery #37 72.7
Pediatric Urology #45 52.5

Ownership/leadership[edit]

Children's Healthcare of Arizona, Inc., an Arizona 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation, is the parent holding corporation for the majority voting member interest in Phoenix Children's Hospital. It manages the majority voting member interest in Phoenix Children's Hospital and provides strategic planning, policy and oversight functions.

Phoenix Children's is also an independent, Arizona 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, governed by a community board of directors.

Robert L. Meyer has served as president and CEO since 2002. He provides leadership over the organization's three major divisions.[26]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Phoenix Children's Hospital". Children's Hospital Association. Archived from the original on 2020-09-02. Retrieved 2020-04-09.
  2. ^ "Why Us? | Phoenix Children's Hospital". www.phoenixchildrens.org. Archived from the original on 2020-09-21. Retrieved 2020-04-09.
  3. ^ "Hematology | Phoenix Children's Hospital". www.phoenixchildrens.org. Archived from the original on 2019-12-25. Retrieved 2020-04-09.
  4. ^ "Programs & Services | Phoenix Children's Hospital". www.phoenixchildrens.org. Archived from the original on 2019-12-25. Retrieved 2020-04-09.
  5. ^ "Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Program | Phoenix Children's Hospital". www.phoenixchildrens.org. Archived from the original on 2019-11-23. Retrieved 2020-04-09.
  6. ^ "Trauma Centers". American College of Surgeons. Archived from the original on 2020-09-21. Retrieved 2020-04-09.
  7. ^ admin. "Growing up with Phoenix Children's Hospital | Raising Arizona Kids Magazine". Archived from the original on 2018-03-24. Retrieved 2020-09-20.
  8. ^ Bell, Chloe (2008-07-13). "Phoenix Children's Hospital Expansion". kontaktmag. Archived from the original on 2020-09-21. Retrieved 2020-09-20.
  9. ^ Editor (2011-05-17). "A Soaring Sanctuary". Kitchell Progress. Archived from the original on 2020-09-21. Retrieved 2020-09-20.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  10. ^ (PDF). January 31, 2017 https://web.archive.org/web/20170131025824/http://azdhs.gov/documents/preparedness/emergency-medical-services-trauma-system/hospitals/certified-als-base-hospitals.pdf. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 31, 2017. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  11. ^ Baietto, Marcella. "Phoenix Children's Hospital unveils $40 million emergency-department expansion". The Arizona Republic. Archived from the original on 2020-09-21. Retrieved 2020-09-20.
  12. ^ Angela, Gonzales (8 December 2015). "Phoenix Children's Hospital breaks ground on $60M project". Phoenix Business Journal. Archived from the original on 2020-09-21. Retrieved 2020-09-20.
  13. ^ Schutsky, Wayne (20 August 2017). "Mercy Gilbert tower to serve women, children". East Valley Tribune. Archived from the original on 2017-08-23. Retrieved 2020-09-20.
  14. ^ Alltucker, Ken. "Phoenix Children's Hospital, Dignity Health join forces to open new Gilbert hospital tower". The Arizona Republic. Archived from the original on 2020-09-21. Retrieved 2020-09-20.
  15. ^ DiNardo, Anne (19 February 2019). "FIRST LOOK: Dignity Health Mercy Gilbert Medical Center, Women's and Children's Tower". Archived from the original on 2020-09-21. Retrieved 2020-09-20.
  16. ^ Molly Gamble (November 13, 2013). "25 Largest Children's Hospitals in America — 2013". Becker's Hospital Review. Archived from the original on October 20, 2014. Retrieved July 18, 2014.
  17. ^ "Trauma Centers". Facs.org. 2014-02-05. Archived from the original on 2015-08-25. Retrieved 2015-08-26.
  18. ^ "Barrow Neurological Institute". Archived from the original on 2020-05-09. Retrieved 2020-09-21.
  19. ^ khadlock (8 June 2015). "P. David Adelson, MD". Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 21 September 2020.
  20. ^ khadlock (5 December 2013). "Providers". Archived from the original on 1 July 2018. Retrieved 21 September 2020.
  21. ^ MollyH (29 August 2016). "Early Access to Care - AZ Program". Archived from the original on 4 July 2018. Retrieved 21 September 2020.
  22. ^ "Phoenix Children's Hospital". usnews.com. U.S. News & World Report. Archived from the original on March 18, 2017. Retrieved March 22, 2017.
  23. ^ "The Leapfrog Group Names 2013 Top Hospitals". Leapfroggroup.org. Archived from the original on June 26, 2014. Retrieved July 18, 2014.
  24. ^ "Quality Report". The Joint Commission. Archived from the original on September 3, 2014. Retrieved July 18, 2014.
  25. ^ "Best Children's Hospitals: Phoenix Children's". U.S. News and World Report. 2021. Archived from the original on 2020-08-17.
  26. ^ "Executive Team". Phoenix Children's. Retrieved September 21, 2020.

External links[edit]