Polar Bear Shores

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Polar Bear Shores
Polar Bear Shores logo.svg
Polar-bear-2.jpg
Sea World
Coordinates 27°57′24″S 153°25′28″E / 27.956707°S 153.424536°E / -27.956707; 153.424536Coordinates: 27°57′24″S 153°25′28″E / 27.956707°S 153.424536°E / -27.956707; 153.424536
Status Operating
Cost AU$6 million
Opening date 26 December 2000 (2000-12-26)
General statistics
Attraction type Polar bear exhibit
Designer Sea World
Theme Arctic summer
Handicapped/disabled access Wheelchair accessible

Polar Bear Shores is a polar bear exhibit at the Sea World theme park on the Gold Coast, Australia.[1][2] As of 2013, the exhibit features four polar bears (Lia, Hudson, Nelson, and Henry).

History[edit]

In 1997, Sea World began planning and designing Polar Bear Shores.[3] On 26 December 2000,[4] Polar Bear Shores officially opened to the public featuring two polar bears, Ping Ping and Kanook.[5] Following its opening, several polar bears were introduced to the exhibit while others were sent to other zoos for breeding programs.[3][6]

On May 9, 2013, Sea World celebrated their first polar bear birth, later revealed to be a male named Henry.[7][8] Television monitors with a live stream to the maternity den were added to the exhibit shortly after.[9] In July 2013, Sea World announced a $1.5 million expansion of Polar Bear Shores to allow Lia and her cub to be displayed separately from Nelson and Hudson.[10] The expanded exhibit, dubbed Polar Pre-School, opened on 21 September 2013.[11][12] Sculpt Studios was involved in the design of the extension.[13]

Exhibits and facilities[edit]

Polar Bear Shores encompasses two public exhibits as well as back-of-house facilities. The main exhibit opened in 2000, with the secondary exhibit, dubbed Polar Pre-School opening in 2013. The public exhibits are themed to an Arctic summer.[3][11]

The above-water viewing deck

The main public exhibit features three viewing areas: underwater, water-level and above-water. An array of educational signs are located in the viewing areas and along the paths between them. A large salt water pool encompasses much of the area with depths of between 1 and 4 metres (3 ft 3 in and 13 ft 1 in). Smaller fresh water pools also exist. A rocky environment fills the rest of the exhibit. A sprinkler system allows the simulation of rain in the covered exhibit. Five large fans, similar to those used in the production of movies, allows the wind speed to be regulated. Mist is used to reduce the air temperature.[3]

The back-of-house facilities include five dens for the polar bears to sleep in when not in the main public exhibit. This is in addition to a maternity den. There is also one exercise yard which is a smaller area containing similar elements to the main exhibit. The exhibit has a dedicated food preparation area and a keeper's office for the monitoring of the bears.[14] An upcharge behind the scenes tour is available under Sea World's Animal Adventures program.[15]

Polar bears[edit]

Since its opening in 2000, Polar Bear Shores has been home to seven different polar bears. As of 2013, four polar bears (Lia, Hudson, Nelson, and Henry) live in Sea World's Polar Bear Shores.

  • Ping Ping was one of the original polar bears for the opening of the exhibit in 2000, having been transported from Beijing Zoo in China.[5] Ping Ping was brought to Sea World with the hope that he would mate with Kanook.[16] However, it never eventuated as Kanook was put down in 2004 due to kidney failure[16] and Ping Ping was returned to Beijing Zoo.[17]
  • Kanook was one of the original polar bears for the opening of the exhibit in 2000, having been transported from Reid Park Zoo in Arizona.[5] Kanook was brought to Sea World with the hope that she would mate with Ping Ping.[16] In April 2003, Kanook was diagnosed with kidney failure.[18] Her condition deteriorated in 2004 and she was subsequently put down.[16]
  • Lia was brought to Sea World as a cub in 2001, with her twin brother Lutik. The two were born in captivity at Leningrad Zoo in Russia.[5] Nelson made several unsuccessful attempts at breeding with Lia from 2008, however, in 2012 Lia was showing signs of a pregnancy.[19][20][21] In May 2013, Lia gave birth to two cubs, one of which survived.[7]
  • Lutik was brought to Sea World as a cub in 2001, with his twin sister Lia. The two were born in captivity at Leningrad Zoo in Russia.[5] In 2006, Lutik had reached sexual maturity and was relocated Alaska Zoo where he was paired with a female for mating.[6]
  • Hudson is the twin brother of Nelson. The two were found abandoned by their parents in the Arctic at approximately 4 months of age. Zoo Sauvage de St-Félicien in Quebec rescued the pair as they were not expected to survive in the wilderness alone. They were relocated to Sea World in late 2004.[3]
  • Nelson is the twin brother of Hudson. The two were found abandoned by their parents in the Arctic at approximately 4 months of age. Zoo Sauvage de St-Félicien in Quebec rescued the pair as they were not expected to survive in the wilderness alone. They were relocated to Sea World in late 2004.[3] Nelson was paired with Lia for mating, with a successful birth in 2013.[19][20][7]
  • Henry was born at Polar Bear Shores in May 2013 with Lia and Nelson as the parents. A second cub was born, however, Lia devoted her efforts to just one cub.[7] The cub took its first steps in July 2013 and went on public exhibition in September 2013.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Polar Bear Shores". Sea World. Retrieved 18 July 2013. 
  2. ^ "Polar Bear Shores (Sea World)". Parkz. Retrieved 18 July 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f "Polar Bear Fact Sheet" (PDF). Sea World. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  4. ^ "Silicone 'a natural' for polar bears home". Jehbco. Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  5. ^ a b c d e "Sea World’s Polar Bear Shores" (Press release). Sea World. 31 December 2002. Retrieved 18 July 2013. 
  6. ^ a b "Polar bears to be separated". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 8 August 2006. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  7. ^ a b c d Elder, Jessica (14 May 2013). "Sea World welcomes polar bear cub". Gold Coast Bulletin. News Corp Australia. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  8. ^ Nancarrow, Dan (1 September 2013). "Sea World announces polar bear cub is male". Brisbane Times. Retrieved 5 September 2013. 
  9. ^ Laughlin, Shaya (24 May 2013). "Polar bear cub rapidly growing". Gold Coast Bulletin. News Corp Australia. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  10. ^ a b Westthorp, Tanya (16 July 2013). "Polar bear cub takes first steps". Gold Coast Bulletin. News Corp Australia. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  11. ^ a b Sea World (16 July 2013). "Timeline Photos". Facebook. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  12. ^ Westthorp, Tanya (21 September 2013). "Polar cub joy tinged with sadness". Gold Coast Bulletin. Retrieved 26 September 2013. 
  13. ^ "Polar Bear Jr". Sculpt Studios. Retrieved 23 August 2014. 
  14. ^ "Polar Bear Shores Minisite". Sea World. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  15. ^ "Behind the Scenes: Polar Bear Shores". Sea World. Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  16. ^ a b c d "Sea World puts down polar bear Kanook". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. June 30, 2004. Retrieved July 20, 2013. 
  17. ^ "One hot summer day of 平平 (Ping Ping), the Polar Bear, at Beijing Zoo, China". YouTube. 14 July 2013. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  18. ^ "Kanook's Condition Deteriorates" (Press release). Sea World. 29 June 2004. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  19. ^ a b Fineran, Leah (15 August 2008). "Torrid romance has Sea World in meltdown". Gold Coast Bulletin. News Corp Australia. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  20. ^ a b Pierce, Jeremy (20 July 2013). "Sea World's handsome Hudson melting ice queen Liya's heart in quest for love". The Courier Mail. News Corp Australia. Retrieved 6 January 2012. 
  21. ^ Westthorp, Tanya (22 December 2012). "Sea World's possible polar bear pregnancy". Gold Coast Bulletin. News Corp Australia. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 

External links[edit]