Public School 9 and Public School 9 Annex

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Public School 9 and Public School 9 Annex
("Public School 111 and Public School 9 Annex")
P.S. 9 and P.S. 9 Annex.jpg
Public School 9 (top) and Public School 9 Annex (bottom)
(2013)
Public School 9 and Public School 9 Annex is located in New York City
Public School 9 and Public School 9 Annex
Public School 9 and Public School 9 Annex is located in New York
Public School 9 and Public School 9 Annex
Public School 9 and Public School 9 Annex is located in the US
Public School 9 and Public School 9 Annex
Location 249 (P.S. 9) and 251 (Annex) Sterling Place
Brooklyn, New York City
Coordinates 40°40′34″N 73°58′11″W / 40.67611°N 73.96972°W / 40.67611; -73.96972Coordinates: 40°40′34″N 73°58′11″W / 40.67611°N 73.96972°W / 40.67611; -73.96972
Built P.S. 9: 1867-68, 1887
Annex: 1895
Architect Samuel B. Leonard
James W. Naughton
Architectural style P.S. 9: Early Romanesque
Annex: Romanesque Revival with Renaissance Revival ornamentation
NRHP Reference # 81000407[1]
Significant dates
Added to NRHP December 14, 1981
Designated NYCL January 10, 1978

Public School 9 and Public School 9 Annex are two historic school buildings located at 249 and 251 Sterling Place, respectively, at Vanderbilt Avenue in the Prospect Heights neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York City.

Public School 9 consists of a central, two-story gabled section flanked by two-story wings. The central section dates to 1867–68 and was designed by Samuel B. Leonard in the Early Romanesque Revival style. The two wings were added in 1887 and were designed by James W. Naughton. The school was originally Public School 9, later becoming Public School 111, and currently P.S. 340.[2]

Public School 9 Annex was necessitated by the continued population growth of Prospect Heights, which caused overcrowding in the original school.[2] It was designed by James W. Naughton and built in 1895. It is a three-story, H-shaped, brick building crowned by gable dormer windows. The Romanesque Revival building incorporates Renaissance Revival style details.[2][3] The building has been converted into condominium apartments under the name "P.S. 9".

Both buildings were separately designated New York City Landmarks in 1978, as "Public School 9" and "Public School 9 Annex"[2] and were listed together on the National Register of Historic Places in 1981, as "Public School 111 and Public School 9 Annex"[1]

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Notes

  1. ^ a b National Park Service (2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ a b c d New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission; Dolkart, Andrew S. (text); Postal, Matthew A. (text) (2009), Postal, Matthew A., ed., Guide to New York City Landmarks (4th ed.), New York: John Wiley & Sons, ISBN 978-0-470-28963-1 , p.258
  3. ^ James T. Dillon and Anne B. Covell (March 1981). "National Register of Historic Places Registration:Public School 111 and Public School 9 Annex". New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Retrieved 2011-02-20.  See also: "Accompanying four photos". 

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