Red Brick Road

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The Red Brick Road Company
Limited Liability Company
Industry Business Services
Founded 2006
Headquarters London, United-Kingdom
Products Advertising & Marketing
Website www.theredbrickroad.com

The Red Brick Road is a Soho, London based advertising agency.[2] It is best known for producing advertisements for Tesco during the late 2000s, including the well known slogan "Every little helps".

History[edit]

The company was created in 2006 by retired Lowe Worldwide executive Sir Frank Lowe[3][4][5] and Paul Weinberger. It was named after the route that Dorothy refused to follow in The Wizard of Oz[6] Lowe retired in 2009, while remaining a shareholder in the company,[7] which continued to be managed by former colleagues.[8]

In 2011, Red Brick Road merged with its sister company Ruby, whose founders replaced the core team.[9] The company suffered a financial setback in 2012 when they lost the Tesco advertising contract, which resulted in Weinberger's departure from the company.[10][11][12] The agency's new management team claims to have a positive outlook about its future.[13]

Notable campaigns[edit]

The agency's best known client was the supermarket chain Tesco,[8] and Weinberger created their slogan "Every little helps".[14] Red Brick Road designed the Christmas 2011 campaign, which featured shots of various people preparing for Christmas in 12 different towns.[15]

The Red Brick Road has managed several other campaigns, including multinational conglomerate Suzuki and drinks manufacturers Jägermeister, Rémy Martin, Magners, Bulmers[citation needed] and Heineken.[16]

Awards[edit]

The company won the 2011 Creative Circle award for "Best TV Commercial (Double Gold)" for their Magners promotion.[citation needed]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Facts". www.haystackonline.com. Haystack. Retrieved 29 November 2013. 
  2. ^ "Introducing TRBR". www.theredbrickroad.com. London, United Kingdom: The Red Brick Road. Retrieved 29 November 2013. 
  3. ^ Brook, Stephen (30 January 2006). "Lowe follows Red Brick Road". www.theguardian.com. The Guardian. Retrieved 6 November 2013. 
  4. ^ Sweney, Mark (22 December 2009). "Sir Frank Lowe to leave The Red Brick Road ad agency". The Guardian. www.theguardian.com. Retrieved 24 November 2013. 
  5. ^ mediaGuardian (17 July 2006). "82. Sir Frank Lowe". The Guardian. London, United Kingdom: The Guardian. Retrieved 24 November 2013. 
  6. ^ Brook, Stephen (2006-01-30). "Guardian: Lowe follows Red Brick Road". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 2013-11-06. 
  7. ^ Hall, Emma (2010-01-04). "Ad Age: Original Mad Man Frank Lowe Leaves Red Brick Road". Ad age. United States of America. Retrieved 2013-11-06. 
  8. ^ a b Sweney, Mark (22 December 2009). "Sir Frank Lowe to leave The Red Brick Road ad agency". The Guardian. United kingdom: theguardian.com. Retrieved 6 November 2013. 
  9. ^ Campaignlive.co.uk. "School Reports 2013: The Red Brick Road". Campaign. campaignlive.co.uk. Retrieved 6 November 2013. 
  10. ^ Smiths, Stuart (19 April 2012). "Time's up for Weinberger, but what about the Tesco account at The Red Brick Road?". Retrieved 29 November 2013. 
  11. ^ Hall, Emma (1 December 2005). "FRANK LOWE, PAUL WEINBERGER LAUNCH AD AGENCY". Advertising Age. Retrieved 29 November 2013. 
  12. ^ campaignlive.co.uk (8 April 2013). "School Reports 2013: The Red Brick Road". Campaign. London, United Kingdom: campaignlive.co.uk. Retrieved 6 November 2013. 
  13. ^ Walford, Tony (5 April 2013). "Following The Red Brick Road buyout: From Tesco to MBO for the agency Sir Frank Lowe started". The Drum. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  14. ^ Humby, Clive; Hunt, Terry; Phillips, Tim (2008). Scoring Points: How Tesco Continues to Win Customer Loyalty. Kogan Page Publishers. p. 281. ISBN 978-0-74946-012-9. 
  15. ^ "Locals help make Tesco Christmas ad special". Tesco. 17 November 2011. Retrieved 29 December 2013. 
  16. ^ "Sir Frank Lowe". Forbes. 180: 70. 2007. 

External links[edit]