Rehab (band)

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Rehab
Buford and Boone Playing Live.jpg
The duo that was most known for being Rehab. Brooks Buford on the left and Danny Boone on the right
Background information
Origin Warner Robins, Georgia, USA
Genres
Years active 1998–2002
2005–2014
Labels Epic
Rehab/Atticasound
Universal Republic
AVJ Records
Associated acts Hank Williams, Jr., Demun Jones, Moonshine Bandits, Brian "BD" Desind, Twiztid
Website http://www.rehabmusic.com/
Members Danny "Boone" Alexander
Demun Jones
Chris Hood
DJ Chris Crisis
Past members Jason "Brooks" Buford
Denny Campbell "Steaknife"
Mike Hartnett
Hano Leathers
FOZ
Lamar Williams Jr.

Rehab is an American Southern rock, country, and alternative hip hop band. The band has recorded seven albums, including two each for Epic Records and Universal Republic. They are mainly known for their 2000 hit, "Bartender Song (Sittin' at a Bar)". Even though the group disbanded after a farewell tour in 2014, Two of the original members are rumored to still be making music.[1]

Early history, To Whom it May Consume (1998-1999)[edit]

Rehab was originally formed as a trio: Denny Campbell (Steaknife), Danny (Boone) Alexander, and Jason Brooks (Brooks Buford). Danny Boone and Steaknife, both from Warner Robins, Georgia, were the rap group "Prime Suspect" Danny Boone and Brooks Buford, both recovering alcoholics and drug addicts. It is a common misbelief that they met at a rehab facility. The trio formed Rehab, literally a product of their namesake. Early on, they released their first album To Whom It May Consume produced by Steaknife and Brooks Buford.

Departure of Steaknife, and Southern Discomfort (2000-2002)[edit]

Soon after To Whom It May Consume, Steaknife was incarcerated and Epic/Sony offered a record deal. The group decided to continue on as a duo. Mashing rap with rock, the duo released their major label debut album, Southern Discomfort, in 2000 on the Sony label. Cee-Lo, Goodie Mob, and Cody ChesnuTT were some of the guests on the album, which would spawn the Top 15 modern rock hit "It Don't Matter" and of course "Sittin' At A Bar" Two years were spent on the road supporting the album, including a stint on the Warped Tour.

Cuz We Can, Departure of Buford, and Hiatus (2002-2004)[edit]

Around 2002, Buford released 26 unreleased Rehab songs on his website. This was later known to fans as Cuz We Can. 22 of the 26 songs were produced by Denny "Steaknife" Campbell. It was later pressed and given out to on tours by Boone in 2007, and was made available on their store. Boone also modified the tracklist of the pressed version, removing certain songs and adding new ones.

After two years on the road supporting the Vans Warped Tour and playing with bands such as Linkin Park, Danny left the group over a difference in creative view points. It was rumoured that Brooks had a drug addiction while touring. After they finished, the duo split and went on an indefinite hiatus.[2]

New Rehab, Graffiti the World, and Welcome Home (2005-2010)[edit]

In 2004, Boone retained the name and recruited four veteran musicians for a new Rehab. Now a quintet with Boone as the lone singer/rapper—and also using his birth name, Danny Alexander—Rehab signed with Arshid Entertainment and released the ambitious Graffiti the World in 2005.

Sometime in 2008, the three original members decided to do a reunion EP and go by the name Southern Discomfort in which the EP would be self-titled. Their label saw this and decided to hault most of the promotion for this since the name of Southern Discomfort was essentially owned by Epic/Sony. In result, the label released "Sitting at a Bar" which was a re-release of their debut album and also an out-lash towards the band. All of this was done without the band's permission.[3] To fight this unauthorized reissue the band re-recorded its now famous drinking song and renamed it "Bartender Song." This version would end up on a 2008 version of Graffiti the World released by the major label Universal. Rehab stuck with Universal for their 2010 album Welcome Home. Which gained the band more commercial success and a "Whole Different" New Fanbase due to the success of a few singles that ran for top 30 Video countdown on CMT until January of 2011.

Gullible's Travels and Breakup (2011-2014)[edit]

Their Follow-up titled "Gullible's Travels" was released on Feb 21, 2012 through AVJ Records (a subsidiary label of Average Joe's Entertainment), and they started the tour of the same name on Friday Jan 13th, 2012 to promote the new album. The Single "Waho by the Hoti" (the Waffle House by the hotel) is available now on iTunes. The video for their single "King of Tweakers", which was released on their website in the summer of 2011, premiered on 2-21-2012 with the album release.[4] A video for the next single "Can't Catch Up To You" will be recorded in April. On July 3rd 2013, A Track by Twiztid was Released off their first Mixtape A New Nightmare Entitled Unjust love, Featuring Danny Boone. The band released a single also in 2013 entitled "Whore" which would be the last recorded content by the band.

In 2014, the band released a statement to their fans that they would be going on a farewell tour and then disband to form solo careers.

Possible Reformation (2015-Present)[edit]

Sometime in June of 2015, former founding member, Denny Campbell (Steaknife) posted on his Facebook page that said there was a possible Rehab reunion between Danny Boone and himself. He continued to post pictures of him and Boone in the studio as well. On March 19th, 2016, a possible album cover was posted on Rehab's website.

Band members[edit]

Timeline

Discography[edit]

Albums[edit]

Studio albums[edit]

List of studio albums, with selected chart positions
Title Album details Peak chart positions
US
[5]
US
Alt.

[6]
US
Heat.

[7]
To Whom It May Consume
Southern Discomfort 22
Cuz We Can
Graffiti the World
  • Released: July 15, 2005
  • Re-Released 2008
  • Label: Attica, Arshid, Universal Republic
  • Formats: CD, digital download
90 24 1
Sittin' at a Bar
  • Released: May 27, 2008
  • Label: Epic
  • Formats: CD, digital download
25
Welcome Home[8]
  • Released: September 7, 2010
  • Label: Universal Republic
  • Formats: CD, digital download
Gullible's Travels[9]
  • Released: February 21, 2012
  • Label: AVJ
  • Formats: CD, digital download
"—" denotes a recording that did not chart or was not released in that territory.

Live albums[edit]

List of live albums
Title Album details
Live and Acoustic
  • Released: 2008
  • Label: Universal Republic
  • Formats: CD, digital download

Mix albums[edit]

List of mix albums
Title Album details
Fixtape
  • Released: 2010
  • Label: Universal Republic
  • Formats: CD, digital download
Fixtape 2
  • Released: June 1, 2012
  • Label: AVJ
  • Formats: CD, digital download

Singles[edit]

List of singles, with selected chart positions, showing year released and album name
Title Year Peak chart positions Album
US
[10]
US
Act. Rock

[11]
US
Alt.

[12]
US
Country

[13]
US
Main. Rock

[14]
US
Pop

[15]
NZ
[16]
"It Don't Matter" 2001 20 19 Southern Discomfort
"Last Tattoo" 2005 Graffiti the World
"Bump"[17] 2006
"Bartender Song" 2008 64 11 60 22 33
"1980"[18]
"Welcome Home" 2010 39 Welcome Home
"Talk About"
"King of Tweakers"[19] 2011 Gullible's Travels
"Why Do I Do"[20]
"Waho by the Hoti"[21] 2012
"Can't Catch Up to You"
"—" denotes a recording that did not chart or was not released in that territory.

Music videos[edit]

List of music videos, showing year released and director
Title Year Director(s)
"It Don't Matter" 2001 Jeff Richter[22]
"Bartender Song" 2008 Frank Borin[23]
"Talk About" (Country Mix) 2011 David Poag[24]
"King of Tweakers" 2012 N/A

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.rehabmusic.com/
  2. ^ "Rehab > Biography". Allmusic. Macrovision. Retrieved 2011-01-25. 
  3. ^ "Rehab Discography". Nate. Retrieved 23 March 2016. 
  4. ^ "Rehab About". Rehab. Retrieved 26 March 2012. 
  5. ^ "Rehab – Chart History: Billboard 200". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved February 28, 2013. 
  6. ^ "Rehab – Chart History: Alternative Albums". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved February 28, 2013. 
  7. ^ "Rehab – Chart History: Heatseekers Albums". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved February 28, 2013. 
  8. ^ Lymangrover, Jason. "Welcome Home – Rehab". AllMusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved February 28, 2013. 
  9. ^ "Gullible's Travels – Rehab". AllMusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved February 28, 2013. 
  10. ^ "Rehab – Chart History: Hot 100". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved February 28, 2013. 
  11. ^ "Rehab – Chart History: Active Rock". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved February 28, 2013. 
  12. ^ "Rehab – Chart History: Alternative Songs". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved February 28, 2013. 
  13. ^ "Rehab – Chart History: Country Songs". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved February 28, 2013. 
  14. ^ "Rehab – Chart History: Mainstream Rock Tracks". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved February 28, 2013. 
  15. ^ "Rehab – Chart History: Pop Songs". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved February 28, 2013. 
  16. ^ "Discography Rehab". charts.org.nz. Hung Medien. Retrieved January 25, 2011. 
  17. ^ "Modern Rock – Available for Airplay Archive". FMQB. Mediaspan Online Services. Retrieved February 28, 2013. 
  18. ^ "CHR – Available for Airplay Archive". FMQB. Mediaspan Online Services. Retrieved February 28, 2013. 
  19. ^ "King of Tweakers – Single by Rehab". iTunes Store. Apple. Retrieved February 28, 2013. 
  20. ^ "Why Do I Do – Single by Rehab". iTunes Store. Apple. Retrieved February 28, 2013. 
  21. ^ "Waho by the Hoti – Single by Rehab". iTunes Store. Apple. Retrieved February 28, 2013. 
  22. ^ "It Don't Matter | Rehab | Music Video". MTV Music. Viacom Media Networks. Retrieved February 28, 2013. 
  23. ^ "Bartender Song | Rehab | Music Video". CMT. Viacom Media Networks. Retrieved February 28, 2013. 
  24. ^ "Talk About Country Mix | Rehab | Music Video". MTV Music. Viacom Media Networks. Retrieved February 28, 2013. 

External links[edit]