Retained name

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

In chemistry, a retained name is a name for a chemical compound that is recommended for use by a system of chemical nomenclature (for example, IUPAC nomenclature), but that is not fully systematic.[1][2] Retained names are often used for the most fundamental parts of a nomenclature system: almost all the chemical elements have retained names rather than being named systematically, as do the first four alkanes, benzene and most simple heterocyclic compounds. Water and ammonia are other examples of retained names.

Retained names may be either semisystematic or completely trivial; that is, they may contain certain elements of systematic nomenclature or none at all.[3] Glycerol and acetic acid are examples of retained semisystematic names; furan and anisole are examples of retained trivial names.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ IUPAC, Compendium of Chemical Terminology, 2nd ed. (the "Gold Book") (1997). Online corrected version:  (2006–) "semisystematic name (semitrivial name)".
  2. ^ a b Panico R, Powell WH, Richer JC, eds. (1993). "Recommendation 9". A Guide to IUPAC Nomenclature of Organic Compounds. IUPAC/Blackwell Science. pp. 162–82. ISBN 0-632-03488-2. 
  3. ^ Panico R, Powell WH, Richer JC, eds. (1993). "Recommendation 0.2.3". A Guide to IUPAC Nomenclature of Organic Compounds. IUPAC/Blackwell Science. p. 14. ISBN 0-632-03488-2. 

External links[edit]