Robbert Klomp

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Robbert Klomp
Personal information
Full name Robbert Klomp
Nickname(s) Clippity
Date of birth (1955-05-14) 14 May 1955 (age 62)
Place of birth Netherlands
Original team(s) Heathfield-Aldgate United
Height 183 cm (6 ft 0 in)
Weight 89 kg (196 lb)
Position(s) Defender
Playing career1
Years Club Games (Goals)
1973–78, 1985 Sturt 205
1979–83 Carlton 84 (17)
1983–84 Footscray 9 (3)
Representative team honours
Years Team Games (Goals)
1977–?? South Australia 7
1 Playing statistics correct to the end of 1985.
Career highlights
  • Sturt premiership player, 1974, 1976
  • Carlton premiership player, 1979, 1982
Sources: AFL Tables, AustralianFootball.com

Robbert Klomp (born 14 May 1955) is a former Australian rules footballer who played with Sturt in the South Australian National Football League (SANFL), and with Carlton and Footscray Football Club in the Victorian Football League (VFL).

Klomp was born in the Netherlands and raised in South Australia. He began playing for Sturt in 1973 and was a key contributor to their premierships in 1974 and 1976. In 1979 Klomp was signed by Carlton and played for them as a defender during his five seasons at the club. He was a member of Carlton's premiership teams in 1979 and 1982. Partway through the 1983 season he crossed to Footscray and played until the next season. He returned to Adelaide for one final season with Sturt in 1985, achieving the 200 game milestone with the Double Blues that year. During his career he also played seven times for South Australia.[1] Klomp's brother Kim played for SANFL clubs Sturt and North Adelaide.

Klomp is remembered by some for being awarded a television set by Channel Seven commentators for being best afield in a night-series game at Waverley Park in 1981 despite having just six kicks, one mark and three handballs for the entire game.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Other Nationalities Team of the 20th century". Full Points Footy. Archived from the original on 7 June 2011. 
  2. ^ "How toss could decide the 8". The Age. Melbourne. 2005-08-22. Retrieved 2009-08-11. 

External links[edit]