SM U-23 (Germany)

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History
German Empire
Name: U-23
Ordered: 18 March 1911
Builder: Friedrich Krupp Germaniawerft, Kiel
Cost: 2,808,000 Goldmark
Yard number: 177
Laid down: 21 December 1911
Launched: 12 April 1913
Commissioned: 11 September 1913
Fate: 20 July 1915 - torpedoed and sunk off Fair Isle, Scotland, by HMS C27
General characteristics Ocean-going diesel submarine
Class and type: German Type U 23 submarine
Displacement:
  • 669 t (658 long tons) surfaced
  • 864 t (850 long tons) submerged
Length: 64.70 m (212.3 ft)
Beam: 6.32 m (20 ft 9 in)
Draught: 3.45 m (11 ft 4 in)
Propulsion:
  • 2 shafts
  • 2 × Germania 6-cylinder two stroke diesel motors with 1,800 PS (1,320 kW; 1,780 shp)
  • 2 × SSW double Motordynamos with 1,200 PS (880 kW; 1,180 shp)
  • 450rpm surfaced
  • 330 rpm submerged
Speed:
  • 16.7 knots (30.9 km/h; 19.2 mph) surfaced
  • 10.3 knots (19.1 km/h; 11.9 mph) submerged
Range:
  • 9,910 nmi (18,350 km; 11,400 mi) at 8 knots (15 km/h; 9.2 mph) surfaced
  • 85 nmi (157 km; 98 mi) at 5 knots (9.3 km/h; 5.8 mph) submerged
Test depth: about 50 m (160 ft)
Boats & landing
craft carried:
1 dingi
Complement: 4 officers, 31 men
Armament:
Service record
Part of:
  • Imperial German Navy
  • IV Flotilla
  • 1 August 1914 - unknown end
  • III Flotilla
  • unknown start – 20 July 1915
Commanders:
  • Kptlt. Erwin Weisbach[1]
  • 1 August – 25 November 1914
  • Kptlt. Hans Adam[2]
  • 26 November – 17 December 1914
  • Kptlt. Egewolf Freiherr von Berckheim[3]
  • 18 December 1914 – 12 January 1915
  • Kptlt. Hans Schultheß[4]
  • 13 January – 20 July 1915
Operations: 3 patrols
Victories: 7 ships sunk (8,822 GRT)

SM U-23[Note 1] was one of the 329 U-boats serving in the Imperial German Navy in World War I.

U-23 was engaged in the naval warfare and took part in the First Battle of the Atlantic.

U-23 served on three war patrols, sinking a total of seven ships for 8,822 gross register tons (GRT). She was baited by the Q ship Princess Louise and torpedoed by HMS C27 at 58°55′N 0°14′E / 58.917°N 0.233°E / 58.917; 0.233Coordinates: 58°55′N 0°14′E / 58.917°N 0.233°E / 58.917; 0.233, off Fair Isle, in Shetland, Scotland. Twenty four men died and 10 survived.

Summary of raiding history[edit]

Date Name Nationality Tonnage[Note 2] Fate[5]
13 May 1915 Invergyle  United Kingdom 1,794 Sunk
15 May 1915 Fingal  United Kingdom 1,562 Sunk
15 May 1915 Martha  Denmark 1,182 Sunk
19 May 1915 Chrysolite  United Kingdom 222 Sunk
19 May 1915 Crimond  United Kingdom 173 Sunk
19 May 1915 Lucerne  United Kingdom 154 Sunk
22 May 1915 Minerva  Norway 3,735 Sunk

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "SM" stands for "Seiner Majestät" (English: His Majesty's) and combined with the U for Unterseeboot would be translated as His Majesty's Submarine.
  2. ^ Tonnages are in gross register tons

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boat commanders: Erwin Weisbach". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 16 March 2015. 
  2. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boat commanders: Hans Adam (Pour le Mérite)". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 16 March 2015. 
  3. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boat commanders: Egewolf Freiherr von Berckheim (Royal House Order of Hohenzollern)". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 16 March 2015. 
  4. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boat commanders: Hans Schultheß". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 16 March 2015. 
  5. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "Ships hit by U 23". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 16 March 2015. 

Bibliography[edit]

  • Gröner, Erich; Jung, Dieter; Maass, Martin (1991). U-boats and Mine Warfare Vessels. German Warships 1815–1945. 2. Translated by Thomas, Keith; Magowan, Rachel. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-593-4.