Selby–Driffield line

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Selby to Driffield Line
to Nafferton
Driffield
to Hutton Cranswick
to Garton
Southburn
Bainton
Middleton-on-the-Wolds
Enthorpe
York to Beverley Line
Market Weighton
York to Beverley Line
Everingham
Holme Moor
Foggathorpe
High Field
Bubwith
River Derwent
Menthorpe Gate
Duffield Gate
to Skipwith (DVLR)
Cliff Common
to Hemingbrough
former ECML to Riccall
River Ouse
Selby
former ECML to Temple Hirst

The Selby–Driffield line formed part of a railway which connected the East Coast Main Line and the Yorkshire Coast Line. It crossed largely flat terrain and the Yorkshire Wolds and serviced the towns of Selby, Market Weighton, and Driffield. The 1881 census shows that Frances Calvert, a widow aged 69, was the "Station Mistress Railway" at Menthorpe Gate.

History[edit]

For more details on this topic, see Hull and Selby Railway.

Stations[edit]

  • Selby – opened 2 September 1834
  • Cliff Common – opened 1853, closed regular services 20 September 1954, used by specials until 1957
  • Duffield Gate – opened 1848, closed 1890
  • Menthorpe Gate – opened 1853, closed 7 December 1953
  • Bubwith – opened 1 August 1848, closed 20 September 1954
  • High Field – opened 1854, closed 20 September 1954
  • Foggathorpe – opened 1853, closed 20 September 1954
  • Holme Moor – opened 1 August 1848, closed 20 September 1954
  • Everingham – opened 1853, closed 20 September 1954
  • Market Weighton – opened 4 October 1847, closed 29 November 1965
  • Enthorpe – opened 1 May 1890, closed 20 September 1954
  • Middleton-on-the-Wolds – opened 1 May 1890, closed 20 September 1954
  • Bainton – opened 1 May 1890, closed 20 September 1954
  • Southburn – opened 1 May 1890, closed 20 September 1954
  • Driffield – opened 6 October 1846

Closure[edit]

The line closed for regular passenger traffic on 20 September 1954, but a service of one regular non-stop train each way plus occasional summer excursions ran until June 1965. The line was abandoned after the last freight train ran later that year.

References[edit]

  • Bairstow, Martin (1990). Railways In East Yorkshire. Martin Bairstow. ISBN 1-871944-03-1. 
  • Butt, R. V. J. (1995). The Directory of Railway Stations: details every public and private passenger station, halt, platform and stopping place, past and present (1st ed.). Sparkford: Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN 978-1-85260-508-7. OCLC 60251199. 

External links[edit]