Shezan International

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Shezan International
Founded 1964
Founders Shahnawaz Group

Shezan International Limited is a Pakistani beverage corporation and manufacturer.

Since its inception in 1964, Shezan a company owned by Shahnawaz Group has produced various products including soft drinks, juices, ketchups, and jams. The company is also the single largest grower of mangoes in Pakistan, and employs roughly 1,000 persons.[1] The company is best known for its trademark product, 'Shezan Mango', a mango juice drink popular in Pakistan.

History[edit]

Shezan International Limited is Pakistani food company. Shezan International Limited' was incorporated on May 30, 1964. Shezan International Limited was conceived as a joint venture by the Shahnawaz Group, Pakistan and Alliance Industrial Development Corporation, United States in 1964.[2]

Production[edit]

Shezan remains amongst Pakistans largest food processing units, having developed and installed the capacity to meet the country's local as well as export needs.

In 1971, Shahnawaz Group purchased all the shares of Alliance Industrial Development Corporation with the permission of the Government of Pakistan. In 1980–81, a separate unit was installed in Karachi, which now caters for Karachi, Sindh and export demand. A bottle filling plant was set in 1983 in Lahore, Punjab. An independent Tetra Brik plant was commissioned in 1987. In 1990, it was decided to install a juice factory at Hattar, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan.[3]

Shezan International's head office is located in Lahore, Pakistan. In Canada, Target Foods is the authorized distributor for all Shezan products and in England, Citi TRADERS UK Ltd and IS TRADERS LTD are the authorized importer and distributors. They carry all the import and distribution of juices, jams, pickles, chutneys, sauces, syrups and squashes.

Products[edit]

Near the end of 2008, Shezan introduced an energy drink brand [4] to Pakistan. This launch coincided with concentrated efforts to gain larger market share in Karachi. Its induction in [5] early 2009 was part of those efforts. Another effort was the 2008 event "Juice Day", arranged in PAF Museum.

Controversy[edit]

Shezan has been the frequent target of controversy due to the religious affiliation of its owners. Several campaigns led by religious conservatives have in the past targeted Shezan, calling for its boycott, and subsequent ban.[6]

Amongst these groups are Khatme Nubuwwat, who have openly called for Muslims to boycott the company and its beverages, declaring on its website and pamphlets:

Shezan brand has its unique taste. It has a quality product which can be compared with any international product.

Shezan products ban[edit]

In 2012, campaigns by traditionally conservative Islamic groups found a more liberal voice, amongst these were lawyers from Lahore Bar Association (Asia's biggest bar association)[7] and Punjab University students, ppoowho also called a boycott to the Ahmadi-owned company and a ban of its products on their premises.[8] Following protests from students, there was an unofficial ban placed on Shezan products at Punjab University.[9] Soon thereafter, The Lahore Bar Association also banned Shezan products from its premises and subordinate court complexes, threatening tough actions against anyone found buying the drink. The move came as 100 lawyers unanimously voted for the ban on Shezan drinks and products.[10]

In the same year, six shops owned by the company were destroyed, and a company worker hurt.[11]

Attacks[edit]

As a consequence of the numerous initiatives to boycott Shezan products in systematic Anti-Ahmadiyya campaigns, several attacks have been recorded against Shezan factories. In June 2010, unidentified assailants stormed a Shezan factory after which high-explosive bombs were detonated that left four dead, and many injured;[12] that came weeks after an attack on two Ahmadiyya mosques during Friday prayers left 94 Ahmadi worshipers dead and 120 injured.

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